National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery Evaluation 2013 Appendices

Indigenous AffairsRemote Australia Strategies Programme
Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Publication author(s):
Australian Government Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
Publication abstract:

The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery (NPA RSD) was a commitment by the Australian, New South Wales, Queensland, South Australian, Western Australian and Northern Territory Governments to address local Indigenous disadvantage. The NPA RSD officially commenced on 27 January 2009 and expired on 30 June 2014.

The broad intent of the NPA RSD, together with other relevant Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreements, was to contribute to improved access, range and coordination of services, improved levels of governance and leadership, and increased economic and social participation in 29 priority locations.

The NPA RSD required that the agreement be reviewed prior to its completion. An evaluation of the NPA was undertaken in 2013 and comprised:

  • in-depth research with 207 key stakeholders
  • a survey and qualitative research with 726 community members
  • a survey of 338 local service providers
  • analysis of outcome data from administrative sources and Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Both the survey of local service providers and outcome data included an analysis of outcomes in other remote communities to establish whether any improvements were part of a broader trend.

The evaluation was guided by four key questions:

  1. Has access to and delivery of services improved?
  2. Has the capacity of communities and governments to engage with one another improved?
  3. Have there been changes in the RSD sites that contribute to the Closing the Gap objectives?
  4. What have we learned from the initiative that can inform remote service delivery, community capacity building, and place-based approaches?

The full report can be accessed at National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery Evaluation 2013.

© Commonwealth of Australia 2014

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ISBN PDF 978-1-922098-26-9 Remote Service Delivery Evaluation 2013 (PDF)
Doc 978-1-922098-25-2 Remote Service Delivery Evaluation 2013 (Hardcopy)
Print 978-1-922098-27-6 Remote Service Delivery Evaluation 2013 (RTF)

 

Contents

Appendix A Engagement, coordination and capacity

Dr Michael Limerick, Limerick & Associates

A.1 Coordination of government services

A.2 Government capacity to engage communities

A.3 Community capacity to engage with government: Community governance and leadership capacity

Appendix B Existing initiatives by jurisdiction

Evidence and Evaluation Branch

B.1 Northern Territory

B.2 South Australia

B.3 Queensland

B.4 New South Wales

B.5 Western Australia

Appendix C High level logic frame

Appendix D Dates of establishing Single Government Interface bycommunity

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Appendix E Progress in land tenure byjurisdiction

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

E.1 Northern Territory

E.2 Queensland

E.3 New South Wales

E.4 Western Australia

E.5 South Australia

Appendix F Projects conducted under the local research and planningproject

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Appendix G Local Reference Group and LIP process by community

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Appendix H Dates of agreement of LocalImplementation Plans bycommunity

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Appendix I Key achievements for Remote Service Delivery locations

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

I.1 New South Wales - key achievements

I.2 Queensland - key achievements

I.3 Western Australia - key achievements

I.4 South Australia - key achievements

I.5 Northern Territory - key achievements

Appendix J Delivery of services under other National Partnership Agreements by community

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

J.1 Early childhood

J.2 Schooling

J.3 Health

J.4 Economic participation

J.5 Healthy homes

J.6 Other Initiatives

Appendix K Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

K.1 Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account process

Appendix L Stakeholder interview guide

O’Brien Rich Research Group

L.1 Stakeholder semi-structured interview schedule

Appendix M Service provider survey: data tables and questionnaire

Dr Judy Putt

M.1 Service provider survey data

M.2 Service provider survey

Appendix N Outcomes

Compiled by the Evidence and Evaluation Branch, with crime data analysis by AIC and healthdata analysis by AIHW

N.1 Student enrolment and attendance

N.2 Achievements in reading, writing and numeracy

N.3 Welfare dependence – Income Support and CDEP Wages recipients

N.4 Job Services Australia in RSD Communities

 

Appendix A Engagement, coordination and capacity

Dr Michael Limerick, Limerick & Associates

This appendix provides additional discussion of the findings in relation to Chapter 1, Section 1.5 Engagement, coordination and capacity.

A.1 Coordination of government services

A.1.1 Coordination between governments at the strategic level

As intended the NPA RSD required the negotiation of bilateral plans[1] in all jurisdictions. The ANAO report found that while the plans were appropriately structured around the various outputs of the NPARSD; ‘the adequacy of performance benchmarks was mixed and no bilateral plan identified funding commitments by the Australian or state/territory governments’, and ‘the selection process for priority locations was not well explained in most plans’.[2]

While there has not been a comprehensive assessment of the performance of the Boards of Management (BoMs)[3] as part of the evaluation, the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services has made several comments, and conducted an assessment[4] to gauge the strength of RSD governance mechanisms. The Coordinator General noted that ‘the Boards of Management are on the whole functioning well and providing leadership for the implementation of the National Partnership’, but that ‘not enough attention has been paid to ensuring the right decision makers are at the table and so ensuring the legitimacy of decisions made at meetings’.[5] Reinforcing these concerns[6], findings from the ANAO also suggested that the less effective BoMs suffered from inadequate senior representation, excessive focus on ‘day to day’ rather than strategic issues, misunderstanding of the BoM’s role, membership fatigue and members being unprepared for meetings.[7]

The stakeholder interviews also confirmed a general view that after a high level of early attention at the BoM level, the intensity of governments’ engagement with each other has fallen away over time. Reasons cited included changed priorities at the jurisdictional level following the election of some new governments and instances of tension between Australian Government and state/territory officers around aspects of RSD implementation. A different view from some stakeholders in both levels of government was that the governance processes had strengthened their relationships and commitment to maintaining cross-jurisdictional relationships.

A.1.2 The coordination role of Regional Operations Centres

Regional Operations Centres (ROCs) were created to co-locate Australian Government and state/territory staff to work together to implement the NPA RSD, drive whole-of-government coordination at the regional level, and to support the planning and coordination work of the community-based Government Business Managers (GBM) and Indigenous Engagement Officer (IEO) staff. The evaluation found there has been considerable variation in the arrangements[8] across jurisdictions, as well as significant changes over time, making it difficult to generalise about the effectiveness of the model in enhancing coordination.

The service provider survey indicated that the ROC model had been effective in improving coordination of service delivery in Queensland (Qld) and Western Australia (WA). Views were split in the Northern Territory (NT) and South Australia (SA), while in New South Wales (NSW) there was a majority view that the ROC had not been effective. These survey results broadly correlate with the views expressed by the wider range of stakeholder qualitative interviews. The findings also confirm observations by the Coordinator General that ROCs were functioning more effectively in some jurisdictions than others.[9]

Key success factors identified through the stakeholder interviews included[10]:

· the strength of the mandate for officers from all levels of government to work together

· how the NPA RSD had created a space for officers in the ROC to step outside their usual ways of operating and share information and collaborate with other agencies that had not occurredpreviously

· being able to capitalise on this authorising environment to bring agencies and stakeholders together to engender a sense of shared purpose around the engagement of communities and the improvement of services through the Local Implementation Plans (LIPs)

· the significant role of strong leadership and lack of turnover of staff.

Despite erosion of the initial momentum, many stakeholders perceived a positive ongoing effect in improved and closer professional relationships across levels of governments and agencies.[11]

Across all jurisdictions, a view was expressed that the early burst of enthusiasm and cooperation had been difficult to sustain. This view was considered by most to be a typical pattern for all new government initiatives, which start with a flurry before attention drifts to other new priorities and initiatives over time.[12] The Cape York Welfare Reform trial seems to have been an exception to this pattern, with the high-level Project Board able to sustain focus and momentum on implementation of the trial for more than four years.[13]

Stakeholder interviews also revealed a view that the idea of the ROCs operating as a ‘single government interface’ had been observed in practice more by Australian Government agencies than state or territory agencies (with the exception of WA)[14], a finding mirrored by the Coordinator General.[15] This is perhaps not surprising given that 74 per cent of the staff are Australian Government employees (almost all FaHCSIA), and the Australian Government met 79 per cent of the ‘single government interface’ costs.[16]

A.1.3 The coordination role of Government Business Managers (orequivalents)

Government Business Managers (GBMs)[17] are Australian Government staff employed to drive place-based coordination and engagement processes in each community. These locally based government positions are supported by Indigenous Engagement Officers (IEOs), Indigenous community members who provide a direct link between the community and governments to improve engagement and coordination efforts. Together, these staff are intended to act as a community-level ‘single government interface’.

A consistent finding from the evaluation is that the GBM position is widely seen as an effective mechanism for improving coordination of government services at the local level. Stakeholder interviews and the service provider survey[18] were universally positive about the concept of the GBM position. These findings are also consistent with the Coordinator General’s description of these positions as a ‘clear success story’[19] and earlier Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER) survey results, where 77 per cent of respondents said the GBM position is an appropriate structure to promote coordination.[20]

Issues impacting on the effectiveness of the GBM role[21] included:

· having the right person with the appropriate skills and attributes for the position[22]

· need for ongoing training and development of staff[23]

· the degree of clarity in the role definition for GBMs

· questions about whether the position has sufficient seniority to carry out its responsibilities (including authority for expenditure decisions)

· concerns that short contracts and high turnover diminished the effectiveness of a role that relies on relationships[24]

· importance of support from regional ROC and Indigenous Coordination Centre (ICC) management.

It is notable that in WA, where stakeholders have tended to be positive about the NPA RSD, there has been the lowest turnover in the GBM positions, with two of the officers occupying the role since the start. In other parts of the country, on average there have been between three to four GBMs, while two communities have had six GBMs and one has had nine.[25]

The community survey found that over half the respondents knew about the IEO in their community (54%). Forty-three per cent were aware of the role of the GBM position. Older people (over 45 years) and employed people were the most likely to know about the role of the GBMs and to have more knowledge about the RSD model.

A.1.4 The coordination role of LIPs

In the implementation of the NPA RSD, LIPs have essentially performed two functions:

· a process for communities , governments, and other relevant sectors to identify local priorities and actions for future investment

· a planning (roadmap), coordination and accountability mechanism between service providers.

In relation to the first function, the NPA RSD is explicit that LIPs are to be developed through consultation with community members to identify local priorities and how they will be met.[26] Thisfunction also relates to community engagement by government.[27]

The second function of the LIPs relates to the whole-of-government planning and coordination role and is the focus here. The NPA RSD describes LIPs as plans that will follow baseline mapping of the social and economic indicators, government investments, services and service gaps in each location.

The bilateral plans provided further detail to achieve the objectives of raising service standards and contribute to the Closing the Gap targets by setting out the requisite improvements to service design and delivery identified by baseline mapping in consultation with stakeholders. The function of LIPs in coordinating the various efforts of governments, NGOs and communities is not explicit in the NPARSD, but is recognised in the bilateral plans.[28] In the LIPs themselves, coordination is enhanced by setting out clearly which agency has the lead for delivering particular actions and which other agencies will be involved. The exercise of identifying various service providers’ contributions to the Closing the Gap building blocks helps to detect areas of duplication by service providers as well as opportunities for joined-up efforts.

Many stakeholders commented positively on the value of the LIPs in providing a process of engagement for providers to develop a joint framework for service delivery, avoid duplication and provide accountability. The strategic focus on the high-level Closing the Gap goals and the organisation of activities around the ‘building blocks’ was considered a good way to make sense of what governments are trying to achieve in remote Indigenous communities.

The value of LIPs is highlighted in a review of coordination and engagement under the NTER, where it was noted that in non-RSD communities, the lack of clear local level plans to drive development ‘meant that many activities on communities were disjointed and not working towards an agreed direction’.[29] In contrast, LIPs gave more focus to community development and LIPs themselves were commended for drawing the link between higher level policy goals with community development on the ground’.[30]

Factors impacting on the success of the LIP process included[31]:

· whether all relevant parties were engaged in the LIP negotiation

· effectiveness of the ROC in leading the engagement process

· perception that the process was Australian Government-driven and not a shared undertaking betweengovernments

· willingness of stakeholders to participate.

Observations about the efficacy of the LIPs noted by the ANAO[32] and mirrored by the Coordinator General included:

· as a result of budget constraints, over half of LIP action items (51%) were to undertake planning, research or review activities rather than concrete deliverables, such as new services or infrastructure (31%)[33]

· performance indicators and benchmarks were not well articulated in LIPs and only some action items contained details about resources and timing[34]

· short times frames for development.[35]

Highlighting that the initial LIPs were intended as a starting point and were to be continually refined was reflected in a LIP review process in 2011–12, and the Coordinator General urging that a high priority in further development of the LIPs should be to have ‘actions more precisely defined, including more specific information on each commitment, deadlines for progress delivery and more clarity around the outcomes sought and performance measures to be met’.[36] Stakeholder interviews reported mixed views about the adequacy of the review process. To date, reviewed LIPs have only been completed for 21 locations.[37]

The LIPs function in underpinning improved coordination and increased accountability is also scaffolded by a rigorous reporting framework.[38] This has been a controversial aspect of the RSD model, with some stakeholders suggesting that the reporting burden has been too onerous, while others insist it is crucial for keeping stakeholders accountable.[39]

In summary, most stakeholders consider the concept of the LIP to have merit as a means of strategically planning and coordinating service delivery at a place-based level. However, the actual implementation of the LIP concept has tended to fall short of this objective.[40] As such, the RSD experience holds valuable lessons for undertaking place-based planning for remote service delivery, in terms of the appropriate scope and intent of the plans, inclusivity of planning processes, the complexity of the format and content, and the optimal performance measurement, reporting and accountability frameworks.

A.1.5 Other coordination strategies and mechanisms

Other strategies and mechanisms to enhance coordination of government services at the community level have included:

· A calendar of service provider visits to the community.[41]

The evaluation heard mixed reports about the success of these processes that will never be able to capture all activity, but were reported by some stakeholders to be useful[42]:

· Regular service provider meetings often called ‘inter-agency meetings’.

Opinions were mixed about the benefits of inter-agency meetings.[43] Some stakeholders suggested they often serve to facilitate ongoing linkages and information-sharing rather than higher-level forms of integrated service delivery or joint planning projects. Effectiveness was seen as largely dependent on the skills of GBMs or ROC staff in facilitating and as already noted[44] [45], training for GBMs in facilitation and coordination methodologies as well as ‘skills and knowledge required for working in a whole-of-government way’[46] for all remote government staff would assist.

Consideration could also be given to inter-agency coordination at the regional level where more senior decision-makers are at the table, rather than frontline staff who have limited delegated authority and are often more embroiled in community-level politics.

A.2 Government capacity to engage communities

A.2.1 Community engagement through the single government interface

The IEO role[47] created to facilitate engagement between government and the community was overwhelming perceived as very positive by service providers and stakeholders[48] [49], with the exception of NSW where the positions had not been continued. This reinforces findings from research in the Northern Territory, where stakeholders were also positive about the value of the IEO role and 91 per cent of survey respondents agreed that the IEO is an appropriate structure to promote engagement in communities.[50] At the community level half the respondents to the community research study knew who the IEO was in their community (54%).

The main reservation expressed in relation to IEOs was that their role is very challenging, because it involves ‘walking in both worlds’.[51] The need for ongoing training for IEOs has been raised in a number of previous reports[52] and in the feedback to the service provider survey[53] several stakeholders also emphasised that their effectiveness is dependent on the support and supervision of the GBM position.[54]

While the GBM role was conceived with a focus on strategic management and coordination of services, the role also has a community engagement element.[55] In some jurisdictions, this is reflected in the title of the position.[56] Despite some weaknesses[57], stakeholders generally saw merit in the GBMs engagement role. This was echoed in the service provider survey, where 23 per cent of respondents viewed the GBMs as ‘very effective’ and 34 per cent saw them as ‘quite effective’ in helping community engagement, while only 18 per cent said they were ‘not very effective’ and eightpercent said they were ‘not effective’.[58]

A.2.2 Community engagement through the LIP process

As discussed earlier[59], LIPs are intended to be the outcome of a process of dialogue to improve service delivery at the same time as trying to provide the vehicle to engage and partner within the community. This section focuses on the LIPs role as a vehicle for engagement.

Service providers who responded to the survey were generally positive about the LIPs effectiveness in identifying local community priorities.[60] Despite this finding, the evaluation revealed mixed views about engagement in the development of LIPs. In the survey, service providers were split on this question, with 39 per cent responding that the LIP process had been ‘quite effective’ or ‘very effective’ in helping community engagement, but 38 per cent responding that it had been ‘not effective’ or ‘notvery effective’.[61] The community research study found that just over one third of community members surveyed (35%) knew of the LIP.

The general view in the stakeholder interviews was that the LIP process was ‘top-down’ and ‘government-driven’ rather than a genuine negotiation process with meaningful community input.[62] The Northern Territory Coordinator General expressed a concern that the LIP development was too process-driven with not enough opportunity for communities to set their own priorities, resulting in the production of ‘unnaturally homogeneous’ LIPs.[63] While noting some examples of good practice in community engagement, the Commonwealth Government Coordinator General was also critical of the process[64], urging a need for less ‘consultation’ and more a ‘negotiation’.[65] [66]

Some stakeholders made the observation that where LIP development had been conducted as little more than a consultation process, they had served merely to generate community ‘wish lists’. In these cases, government staff had neglected to have the ‘hard conversations’ necessary for a genuine negotiation process. Stakeholders frequently pointed out that poor communication by government about the LIP scope; possible resourcing and achievable timeframes had led to unrealistic expectations and community anger and frustration.[67] Where poor engagement had occurred, the LIP process had not achieved the engagement goal of facilitating a ‘co-design’ process.[68]

One of the explanations for poor engagement was that the LIP process was too rushed to meet timeframes[69] [70], a learning that was also reported from the COAG trials.[71] However, this may be a balancing act, as some partners in the COAG trials believed the time taken was too long.

A.2.3 Community engagement through the Local Reference Groups

Local Reference Groups (LRGs) were developed as a mechanism for engagement with Indigenous communities to develop the LIPs.[72] Structured according to local needs and circumstances, the effectiveness of these arrangements has varied widely and has been highly dependent on the strength of existing community governance structures.[73]

Issues raised by some of the stakeholders interviewed included:

· unrealistic in many locations to expect a single entity to act as the ‘community voice’

· LRGs were not representative of their communities or were pushing the vested interests of privileged powerbrokers

· LRGs were not always effective in providing regular feedback to the broader community about the LIP progress.

That being said, it appears that community members are actually more positive about the LRG and their role than stakeholders. The community research study found that the majority of community members (61%) knew about the LRG. In addition to assessing community awareness of the LRG the survey also sought to establish the relationship between the LRG and community engagement. Community members rated the LRG highest for ‘talking up for the community’ (44% scored the LRG seven or more out of 10 for this criteria), while around one third rated the LRG seven or more out of 10 for their ability to ‘talk up for you’ and ‘give information back to you’ (37% and 35% respectively).

The Coordinator General expressed concern that staff implementing the NPA RSD were not sufficiently skilled in community development approaches to effectively undertake the engagement and negotiation required: ‘The decision making structures and mechanisms in many Remote Service Delivery communities are complex, and include many formal and informal leaders. I will continue to advocate for tailored support for Regional Operations Centres to ensure that they are engaging with the right decision makers’.[74]

A.2.4 Service provider engagement with communities

The service delivery principles[75] within the NPA RSD reinforce the importance of service providers also improving engagement with the community. In 2011 the Coordinator General, stressed that ‘it is equally important that key staff, such as teachers, health workers and police, also develop relationships of trust with communities’.[76]

Apart from the observation that some service providers were making effective use of the IEO positions, the stakeholder interviews did not elicit any consistent feedback that the capacity of service providers to engage the community had improved as a result of the NPA RSD.

Service providers reported high levels of community engagement by their organisations across a range of engagement methods, most notably by consulting with local community members and consulting with local leaders.[77] [78] It is not possible to conclude that the RSD model has improved community engagement by service providers as the response was no different between RSD communities and non-RSD communities.

A.2.5 The capacity of government staff to engage effectively

While commending government capacity-building activities at the national-level, the Coordinator General also noted that a ‘one size fits all’ solution is not the best model given the diversity of Indigenous communities.[79] He has urged that all such training be tailored to local circumstances and focus not just on cultural competency but on broader community development skills. By his sixth report in late 2012, he indicated that sufficient progress had not been made: ‘It remains of concern that, despite clear lessons from previous community interventions, there is still insufficient investment in building the capacity of government staff (on the ground and centrally) to ensure they have the capability to carry out their work effectively, including in a culturally informed way’.[80]

A recurring theme in the Coordinator General’s reports is whether the RSD model has been able to encourage and equip government staff to adopt a fundamentally new way of working in Indigenous communities, based on principles and practices of engagement, partnership and community development.[81] In the implementation of the NPA RSD, there have been examples of innovative practice consistent with this new way of working.[82] Yet persistent feedback from stakeholders about ‘top-down’, inflexible or ‘overly bureaucratic’ practices underline that redefining the relationship between government and Indigenous communities is a long-term endeavour.[83]

The community research study asked community members to score the government out of 10 on a number of engagement issues. Community members were asked to rate how well they thought government listened, worked with and helped to improve the community. Community members were more positive about government helping to make the community a better place (32% scoring government ‘seven or more out of 10’ and 31% scoring ‘four or less out of 10’), than they were about government understanding community culture (47% scoring ‘four or less out of 10’). In general, community members feel that governments do not listen to the community, with 40 per cent of respondents scoring government between ‘one and four out of 10’, and only 19 per cent gave a score of ‘seven or higher’.

A.3 Community capacity to engage with government: Community governance and leadership capacity

A.3.1 Support for community participation and input into LIP development

Community participation in the negotiation of the LIP was intended to occur through LRGs. As discussed earlier, the effectiveness of LRGs has varied, working most effectively where it was built on strong, functional community governance structures already in place.

The evaluation found that assistance to build the capacity of LRGs has been sporadic across the RSD sites and where it has occurred, has usually been of limited intensity. The general view expressed in stakeholder interviews[84] was that there had not been any substantial improvements in strengthening community governance capacity-building. Many stakeholders felt that this complex and difficult objective was not recognised appropriately in the RSD design. In many locations, stakeholders struggled to recall any governance training or other forms of capacity-building provided to LRGs. Asenior government officer reflected that RSD had been a ‘lost opportunity’ to do more in the governance capacity-building area and suggested that there had been a misplaced expectation that simply establishing LRGs would be the ‘panacea’.[85] This view was echoed by many governmentstakeholders.

Activities to support the LRGs included:

· Training in meeting protocols and governance fundamentals in WA sustained over the long-term had started to reap dividends[86]

· In NSW, secretarial assistance was provided for the Community Working Parties, which perform the role of an LRG

· Some ROCs implemented community-based planning projects to facilitate community input intopriority-setting[87]

· Members of LRGs have been a target audience for the National Indigenous Leadership Programme training, discussed further below.

Overall, as repeatedly highlighted by the Coordinator General, the approach to building the capacity of LRGs has been piecemeal, of variable quality and effectiveness, and not aligned to the LIP planning process[88]:

In my view, insufficient attention has been paid to integrated support for building community and organisational governance capacity in the priority communities. Even though a partnership model of planning for improvements is envisaged, the initial development of Local Implementation Plans has not been accompanied by robust short-term measures to support quality engagement in some communities. Nor are long-term governance strategies evident in many Local Implementation Plans.[89]

A.3.2 Local research and planning projects

Outside the LRGs, another avenue for community input into the RSD local implementation planning processes was the option to initiate local research and planning projects. The NPA RSD tasked the Australian Government with responsibility for building a research capacity to provide advice to government on local and systemic issues associated with cultural accessibility.[90] FaHCSIA supported 21 Community Planning, Research and Development Projects since 2009 at a cost of around $1.3million. These diverse place-based projects have trained and supported local community members to conduct local research in a culturally appropriate manner to build the evidence base needed for service delivery planning.

While the projects have not been separately evaluated, in some locations stakeholders commented positively on the value of the participatory approaches and the local employment opportunities that had resulted from the projects. These projects are a valuable means of facilitating appropriate community input into LIP planning at the same time as building community research capacity. Perhaps in an indirect way, they may also serve to build governance capacity by equipping community members to collect, analyse and present data in a way that informs planning and decisionmaking. These valuable projects have not been sufficient, however, to allay the perception that the LIP process has generally been top-down and driven by government, rather than a sustained partnership with meaningful ongoing community engagement.

A.3.3 Nationally delivered governance training

In the early years of RSD implementation, selected community residents participated in governance workshops as part of FaHCSIA’s National Indigenous Leadership Programme. From October 2010 to June 2011, 18 workshops were delivered to a total of 312 participants. In some locations, the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC) also delivered governance training to Indigenous community organisation members. Stakeholders saw value in such training programmes, although they appeared to be time-limited training activities rather than part of an integrated strategy of community governance development across the RSD sites.[91] The Coordinator General has been recommending an integrated ‘Governance, Leadership and Capacity Building Framework’ to support RSD implementation since 2010.[92] Consultation was undertaken under the previous government on a COAG National Indigenous Governance and Leadership Framework. The review of Indigenous programmes, due to be completed in March 2014, will inform the direction for this framework.[93]

A.3.4 Local Implementation Plan actions under the ‘community governance and leadership’ building block

All LIPs contain actions under the ‘community governance and leadership’ building block. In his second report the Coordinator General noted that the plans were lacking detail about how they will be achieved.[94] They typically focus on mapping existing governance arrangements, training community members, developing cultural competency of local staff and youth leadership development.[95]

Stakeholders noted a range of youth leadership programmes that had been delivered in RSD sites, all of which were considered to be worthwhile. However, they also noted that one-off activities were insufficient to make any long-term difference and sustainable outcomes from these programmes were difficult to achieve.[96] Stakeholders urged that government and communities support follow-up activities with participants from the time-limited leadership programmes in order to build on the short‑term excitement or enthusiasm that is generated.

A.3.5 Indigenous community organisation capacity-building

There does not seem to have been a concerted strategy to build the capacity of Indigenous community organisations in RSD sites. [97] [98] Some stakeholders expressed the view that service delivery approaches intensified by governments had actually eroded the capacity of Indigenous community organisations. Stakeholders in several locations noted the absence of community-controlled service delivery organisations[99] raising concerns about diminishing opportunities to develop local capacity for running these services.[100] Several stakeholders from both the community and government sectors were concerned that governments should take the time to build the capacity of local Indigenous organisations to deliver community-controlled services,[101] rather than relying on large non‑IndigenousNGOs:

Governments should move away from competitive tendering as this diminishes the opportunities for local people to build their capacity and experience as well as being a barrier for the local economy. Government regional service manager[102]

These sentiments echo recent public statements by several high-profile commentators on Indigenous policy, including Indigenous leader, Noel Pearson,[103] former Northern Territory Coordinator General, Olga Havnen,[104] and former leading bureaucrat, Peter Shergold.[105] These commentators have argued that the increasingly risk-averse nature of bureaucracy is an impediment to governments supporting greater Indigenous community control of services. Pearson and Havnen are particularly critical of the reliance on non-Indigenous NGOs to deliver services in remote Indigenous communities. Havnen argues that ‘Aboriginal control of service delivery in many areas has withered on the vine’ and ‘the massive expansion of NGO involvement in service delivery – often undertaken with scant or non-existent evidence bases – has added to this acceleration in decline of community capacity’.[106] Pearson believes that what governments have ‘failed to understand’ is that:

while you can outsource government services, you cannot outsource leadership… This leadership must come from the people whose lives and futures are at stake. Mission Australia or some private provider that has some temporary government tender to provide employment services to a community cannot provide the necessary leadership.[107]

Service provider workshops[108] as part of the evaluation revealed that the Indigenous organisations that seemed to have been most successful in surviving in an environment of competitive tendering were larger regional Indigenous organisations, who could demonstrate stronger managerial and financial capacity. Other Indigenous organisations still delivering services at the community level were Aboriginal health services, which tended to have a mixture of Indigenous staff and professional non-Indigenous staff, and land management bodies and art centres, which deliver programmes that by their nature require local Indigenous stewardship.

In summary, the evaluation has found little evidence of progress in meeting the NPA RSD objectives to build the capacity of community organisations. The lack of progress in this area was emphasised by the Coordinator General in his sixth report.[109] There has not been a concerted strategy or programme of activities within the RSD model to contribute to this objective. Moreover, other objectives within the NPA RSD, which focus on rapidly expanding services to close the gap with mainstream service levels, have in practice worked against the objective of building local community organisations’ capacity to govern and manage services.

 

Appendix B Existing initiatives by jurisdiction

Evidence and Evaluation Branch

B.1 Northern Territory

B.1.1 Northern Territory Emergency Response/ Closing the Gap in the Northern Territory National Partnership Agreement

The Northern Territory Emergency Response (NTER) which was announced on 21 June 2007 intended to ensure the safety and wellbeing of Indigenous children within prescribed areas, and in the longer-term, to underpin a sustainable and better future for residents in those communities. Theseaims were adopted under the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement (RSDNPA) by addressing community safety, ensuring better education and employment outcomes, and improving access to health services. All Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery (RSD) locations were also NTER communities.

An independent review of the NTER conducted in October 2008 assessed the effectiveness of the measures and their impact on individuals and communities after the first year. The review noted the importance of an integrated approach to addressing the inter-connected nature of the response and emphasised the importance of coordination and responsiveness to the characteristics of eachcommunity.

The then Australian Government’s response to the first year review of the NTER included a continuation of the measures commenced in 2007 under the NTER and relevant legislation until 30June 2012. The ongoing measures were managed under the Closing the Gap in the Northern Territory (NT) National Partnership Agreement (CtGNT NPA) to strengthen and consolidate investment under the NTER.

The CtGNT NPA was a three year development phase that maintained and strengthened the core NTER measures, while placing a greater emphasis on community engagement and partnerships, and building capability and leadership within Indigenous communities. The NTER/CtGNT NPA was evaluated in 2011.

B.1.2 Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory National Partnership Agreement

The Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory Act 2012 came into effect in July 2012 and repealed the Northern Territory National Emergency Response Act 2007. The CtGNT NPA expired on 30June2013.

Under the National Partnership Agreement for Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory the Australian Government has made a ten‑year commitment to work with Aboriginal people in the NT to support strong, independent lives, where communities, families and children are safe and healthy.

The Australian Government will work with Aboriginal people to support more local jobs, ensure communities are safe and encourage children to go to school, as well as provide basic services, including health, education and police.[110]

B.1.3 Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional PartnershipAgreement

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement (RPA) [111] is an agreement between the Anindilyakwa Land Council (ALC), the Australian Government, the NT Government, the East Arnhem Shire Council (EASC) and the Groote Eylandt Mining Company (GEMCO) to work together to improve conditions for Indigenous people living in the Anindilyakwa region. Thecommunities that fall under the RPA are two RSD locations, Angurugu and Umbakumba, and Milyakburra which is not an RSD community. The RPA addresses locally identified priorities and works towards sustainable and measurable outcomes. It is also a commitment to improve coordination, work more closely with local people and organisations to implement services and programmes, and to develop innovative solutions to key issues. The RPA draws on the experience of the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) trials and earlier RPAs.[112]

The RPA was initiated by the traditional owners, who put forward their concerns and ideas for action. Local Aboriginal people have since driven the development and implementation of the RPA through the ALC. The RPA and all funded projects have been negotiated with the ALC following community consultation. Individual projects also emphasise the need for local engagement at all stages.

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island RPA was conducted in two stages. Stage one was signed on 20 May 2008 by the ALC and the Australian and Northern Territory Governments. Stage two was signed by the original parties, GEMCO and the EASC on 10 November 2009.

An evaluation of the RPA was completed in May 2012.[113]

B.2 South Australia

Both South Australian RSD communities (Amata and Mimili) are located in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands (APY Lands). The APY Lands Regional Partnership Agreement (RPA) came into effect on 7 August 2013.

The APY Lands RPA aligns the efforts of the community, regional Anangu organisations and governments towards meeting identified regional priorities and provides leverage to address the current social disadvantage in the APY Lands. It also provides a regional structure that will promote inclusiveness, collaboration, representation and accountability. Key elements of the RPA are a:

· commitment to work together to strengthen regional governance, planning and coordination ofservices

· governance and monitoring structure which supports the partnership and promotes representation and participation of Anangu

· commitment to develop a regional plan which identifies key priorities for the region and sets out operational processes, identified as ‘Schedules’ to the RPA.

A Governance Support Officer was appointed to work with the APY in early April 2013 to assist with driving the RPA locally and facilitating engagement with Anangu. Australian Government funding for this position was provided until December 2013.

B.3 Queensland

B.3.1 Cape York Welfare Reform

An earlier initiative in Queensland (and complementary to the RSD NPA), the Cape York Welfare Reform (CYWR) is being trialled in four of the RSD locations - Aurukun, Hope Vale, Coen and Mossman Gorge. The CYWR aims to rebuild social norms, re-establish Indigenous authority, increase engagement in the real economy, and move individuals and families from welfare housing to home ownership in the four participating communities. The CYWR came into effect in late 2007 in each of the four communities.

The 2012 Cape York Welfare Reform Evaluation[114] found that there was initially some tension between the CYWR and RSD NPA, particularly at the strategic governance level. The relationship between the CYWR and the RSD NPA was not clear in the 2008 CYWR Project Board Agreement.[115] This was rectified in the revised draft project board agreement prepared in July 2010[116] where the interaction between the CYWR and RSD NPA was specifically documented, stating ‘The COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Services Delivery (NPA RSD) supports the efforts of the CYWR through concentrating attention and effort on how government services are to be delivered and integrated (i.e. the service delivery model) in Indigenous communities’.

The revised draft project board agreement notes the intent is for RSD NPA to fit into the ideological approach of CYWR. Rather than services being delivered from outside of the community, service delivery must be Indigenous-led with programmes co-designed by Indigenous people based on specific community need, and should incorporate a strong personal responsibility component. Nevertheless, the introduction of the RSD NPA caused some tension in the strategic management of the CYWR trial and for some time it was seen as a hindrance to progress. It appears that this issue has now been resolved.[117]

B.4 New South Wales

B.4.1 Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly[118]

The Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly (MPRA) is the peak representative body for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island people across 16 communities in Western NSW including Wilcannia and Walgett.

The MPRA and its membership of Aboriginal Community Working Parties (CWPs) form the governance framework that facilitates engagement with and co-ordination by the Australian and NSW Governments and service providers for the delivery of services and programmes against priorities of Aboriginal people through a comprehensive planning process. The MPRA's governance model promotes good governance, responsible leadership and empowerment.

A priority for the MPRA is to engage with government to improve services that close the gap. TheMPRA is affiliated with a number of other organisations which are primarily responsible for service delivery and community development in Indigenous communities in Western NSW.

B.4.2 Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement

The Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement[119] (MP RPA) between the MPRA and the Australian and NSW Governments was signed on 28 January 2009. It commits governments to work with the Assembly and the 16 CWPs in the region to make a difference for Aboriginal people in those communities. Both governments have agreed that the MPRA will conduct its own review of the MP RPA to ensure it is consistent with the new focus from COAG on remote service delivery.[120]

The MP RPA focuses on governance and leadership. To this effect the NSW Government’s Partnership Community Program and the Australian Government’s Indigenous Leadership Program work hand in hand with the MPRA and CWPs to formalise and strengthen the governance structures in the communities.

A new RPA was signed by the MPRA, NSW Government and the Australian Government on 11July2013 for a five year duration. Consistent with the Murdi Paaki Regional Action Plan, the RPA’s priorities include leadership and governance, engagement with local government, reducing incarceration rates, and men’s and women’s business.

B.4.3 Murdi Paaki Aboriginal Young Leaders Project

The Murdi Paaki Aboriginal Young Leaders Project is a regional leadership development programme for Aboriginal young people to increase their knowledge and skills in community governance leading to increased representation of Aboriginal young people in CWPs and other decision making bodies.

In the Murdi Paaki Region of NSW, strong local and regional governance has enabled Aboriginal people to engage successfully with governments in delivering a range of initiatives over two decades. Both Walgett and Wilcannia have Aboriginal CWPs to function as the key point of contact with government. CWPs are generally viewed by their communities as legitimate and representative structures for identifying community priorities and liaising with governments.[121]

B.5 Western Australia

B.5.1 Fitzroy Valley Futures Forum

The Fitzroy Valley Futures Forum is an established governing body for the Fitzroy Crossing town and surrounding communities. It was launched in 2000 and has evolved into the principal mechanism for community to engage with governments.

In 2007 a Governing Committee was established which receives some support from the Western Australia (WA) Government. It has since identified and implemented community priorities for the Fitzroy Valley site, and in 2010 a Local Implementation Plan (LIP) was signed.

A restructure of the forum was implemented following a review funded by the WA Government in 2011. This entailed an expansion of the Governing Committee membership to include eight community, eight language group and three government members to ensure broader cross-representation and better ongoing support for the governance system. Eight sub-committees were established which are loosely aligned to the Closing the Gap building blocks. Further capacity building and support for the governance structure were also identified as priorities within the FitzroyValleyLIP.

B.5.2 Regional Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Employment in the East Kimberley

In 2006 the East Kimberley Regional Partnership Agreement (the Partnership) was signed between the Australian Government, the WA Government, a number of key corporate stakeholders and local Aboriginal Community Corporations.

This Partnership was based upon the principles enumerated in the National Framework Principles for Service Delivery to Indigenous Australians, which was endorsed by COAG in June 2004. It was created pursuant to a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Minerals Council of Australia and the Australian Government (1 June 2005–2010). It was the first of several partnerships which are provided for by the MoU, with the East Kimberley region being one of seven pilot sites established to implement the MoU objectives (Minerals Council of Australia, 2006, 2).

The Partnership was agreed in response to an inequity in employment outcomes that was revealed in Census data from 2001. This data showed that only 13.6 per cent of the East Kimberley region's Indigenous labour force aged 15 years and over was employed, compared with 66.1 per cent of the non-Indigenous population in the same age group. The Partnership sought to address these high levels of unemployment by detailing approaches and projects for joint action by Indigenous organisations and individuals, industry and government (Indigenous Portal Website, March 2007).

The Partnership informally concluded earlier than expected and was essentially superseded by the East Kimberley Development Package - a partnership between the Australian and WA Governments. This Partnership primarily focused on strong capital infrastructure investment activity to promote healthy, strong and resilient communities and provide meaningful and sustainable jobs for local Indigenous people in the East Kimberley region.

B.5.3 West Kimberley / Browse Basin Tripartite Forum

On the Dampier Peninsula, a Tripartite Forum between the Australian Government, WA State Government and the Kimberley Land Council relating to the development of the Browse Basin LNG proposal occurred alongside the establishment of the RSD programme. This process contributed to discussions relating to economic opportunities for the Beagle Bay and Bardi Jawi RSD sites. TheTripartite Forum operated to November 2012.

 

Appendix C High level logic frame

Appendix C RSD High level logic frame

Appendix D Dates of establishing Single Government Interface bycommunity

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Jurisdiction and

community

ROCs established

BOM established

GBMs commenced

IEOs commenced

New South Wales

September 2009

November 2009 (SMC)

 

Walgett

 

4 December 2009

17 May 2010

Wilcannia

7 December 2009

27 April 2010

Queensland

September 2009 (Cairns and Mt Isa)

November 2009

 

Doomadgee

 

September 2009

14th December 2009

Mornington Island

September 2009

9th December 2009

Coen

 

No IEO

Aurukun

 

July 2010

Hopevale

 

August 2010

Mossman Gorge

 

No IEO

South Australia

July 2009

November 2009

 

Mimili

 

November 2009

December 2009

Amata

December 2009

January 2010

Western Australia

June 2009

November 2009 (SOC)

 

 

Ardyaloon

 

Interim from July 2009, permanent March 2010

December 2009

Beagle Bay

Interim from July 2009, permanent March 2010

December 2009

Fitzroy Valley

 

Interim was ROC manager from July 2009, permanent March 2010

December 2009

Halls Creek

Interim from September 2009, permanent March 2010

Interim from October 2009, permanent June 2010

Northern Territory

November 2009

August 2009

 

Angurugu

 

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Galiwin’ku

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Gapuwiyak

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Gunbalanya

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Ntaria/ Hermannsburg

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Lajamanu

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Maningrida

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Milingimbi

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Wurrumiyanga/Nguiu

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Ngukurr

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Numbulwar

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Umbakumba

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Position advertised September 2009

Wadeye

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Yirrkala

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Yuendumu

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

Existed prior to RSD as part of the NTER

 

Appendix E Progress in land tenure by jurisdiction

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

E.1 Northern Territory

In the Northern Territory, three RSD locations entered into township leases under section 19A of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, Wurrumiyanga in 2007, and Angurugu and Umbakumba in 2008. The land administration systems in township lease communities support the creation of individual titles that are important preconditions for economic development and home ownership opportunities.

In the remaining RSD locations, leases for residential, business and community purposes can be granted under section 19 of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. A three year cadastral survey project is underway in all RSD locations in the Northern Territory that will facilitate leasing, especially for individuals and private enterprises.

E.1.1 Area plans and zoning maps

As of May 2013, eleven RSD communities had town plans (Area Plan and Zoning Map) gazetted (Table E.1).

Table E.1 RSD locations with area plans and zoning maps in place and date when they came into effect

Community

Area plans gazettal date

Zoning Map gazettal date

Umbakumba

10 August 2010

August 2010

Angurugu

10 August 2010

August 2010

Ngukurr

26 October 2011

July 2011

Hermannsburg

14 December 2011

November 2011

Wurrumiyanga

25 January 2012

November 2011

Lajamanu

02 May 2012

January 2012

Milingimbi

30 May 2012

November 2011

Gapuwiyak

08 May 2013

May 2013

Numbulwar

22 May 2013

 

Gunbalanya

29 May 2013

 

Wadeye

29 May 2013

 

Source: www.lands.nt.gov.au

E.1.2 Housing leases

All Northern Territory RSD locations, and many smaller communities, now have housing leases in place to enable the building of new houses and refurbishments under National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH) (see also Appendix J).

Additionally, a new subdivision of 65 houses was opened in June 2012 in Galiwin’ku.

In Wurrumiyanga, through Indigenous Business Australia’s Home Ownership on Indigenous Land Program, 15 loans had been approved for Wurrumiyanga residents to buy their own home, with 14settled as of February 2013.

E.2 Queensland

In Queensland, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land Holding Act 2013 (Qld) was recently passed, aiming to:

· resolve long-standing uncertainties involving leases on Deed of Grant in Trust land

· provide local governments with continued access to and use of their facilities on Aboriginal Land Act 1991 (Qld) and Torres Strait Islander Land Act 1991 (Qld) land

· enable subdivision of Deed of Grant in Trust land

· clarify Indigenous Access and Use Agreements under the Land Act 1994 (Qld).

The Remote Indigenous Land and Infrastructure Program Office was established in 2009 to facilitate land administration across 16 remote Indigenous communities in Queensland, including in the RSD locations of Aurukun, Hope Vale and Mornington Island.

E.2.1 Progress to date

Communities recorded actions in their Local Implementation Plans (LIPs) associated with land tenure and housing leases. Below is a summary of progress against the LIP actions for the communities of Aurukun, Hope Vale, Doomadgee and Mornington Island. Further information on the status of tenure reforms can be found at Appendix J under NPARIH.

Aurukun

Aurukun received $4.2 million to develop 24 lots to support future housing construction. Consultations and negotiations around 99 year leases and Transfer of Land under Lease (Aboriginal Land Act 1991 (Qld)) are continuing. Allotments within the town boundary have now been surveyed and signed off by the Mayor. They have been sent for registration.

Hope Vale

Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council signed a 40 year lease with the Qld Department of Housing and Public Works which gave the latter direct management of 55 houses for that duration and any new houses it may build there.

Doomadgee

In Doomadgee 207 leases were requested and lease surveys have been completed and original plans received.

A number of tenure issues around land and existing infrastructure have been identified. Doomadgee Council, the Department of Environment and Resource Management and other key agencies were working together to resolve them. The first step was the revised road plan which was registered on22March 2012.

Mornington Island

Survey plans for social housing 40 year leases were completed in May 2011. Two hundred and forty nine leases were requested and lease surveys complete and original plans received for 248 lots. Aroad plan was registered in 2012.

E.3 New South Wales

In NSW, the RSD locations of Walgett and Wilcannia are gazetted towns; however there are a number of land administration issues affecting the creation of individual title and integrated landdevelopment.

On 5 December 2011, a review of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 (NSW) was announced that included the following objectives in the terms of reference:

  1. Inquire into and make general recommendations as to whether the aims and objectives of the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 (NSW) require expansion or change in light of developments since 1983.
  2. Inquire into and make recommendations as to whether the administrative and operational provisions within the Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 (NSW) require any change to facilitate and improve the efficacy of the Act.

E.4 Western Australia

The Western Australian Government is actively engaged in mediating current native title claims and has been proactive in exploring constructive native title solutions in relation to both native title claims and future acts. The use of a Government Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) presents the opportunity for native title claimants to raise their land use planning interests in the negotiation process. The Government is negotiating an ILUA with the Bunuba Dawangarri Aboriginal Corporation with regard to the Fitzroy Crossing town site and environs.

The Remote Service Delivery Bilateral Implementation Plan identifies the WA Department of Aboriginal Affairs as the lead agency (in collaboration with other government agencies and stakeholders) to progress land tenure reform.

In June 2012, the WA Government released a new operation and policy framework: the Department of Indigenous Affairs Strategic Framework 2012–2014. The Strategic Framework includes a vision for Aboriginal land to be transferred to Aboriginal organisations and to build their capacity to secure economic returns from assets.

In WA, while Fitzroy Crossing and Halls Creek are gazetted towns there are a number of land administration issues that affect the creation of individual interests and integrated land development in these communities (see below for more information).

The communities of Beagle Bay and Ardyaloon have complex land tenure profiles including Crown Reserves managed by Aboriginal Land Trusts, some pastoral leasehold, freehold title and special leasehold in surrounding areas.

Further detail on the status of tenure reforms in WA can be found at Appendix J underNPARIH.

E.4.1 Progress to date

Bardi Jawi

The Kimberley Land Council (KLC) has been engaged through the Indigenous Remote Service Delivery (IRSD) Special Account Fund to map the lines of authority between a Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC) and Community Council. The purpose of this project is to assist each entity to understand their role and responsibility. A workshop on land, land use and tenure was held inMarch2012.

It is the aim of the Aboriginal Land Trust Estate (ALT) through the Department of Indigenous Affairs (DIA) to divest land held in ALT to appropriate Aboriginal stakeholders. In Bardi Jawi preliminary discussions between the ALT and the Bardi Jawi PBC have commenced on an informal basis. Homeownership for Bardi Jawi community members is linked to future land reform: the identification of individual lots and the ability for the occupant to secure the titles to the land and the infrastructure built on the land is a requirement. DIA is actively involved in the discussions (through its relationship with the ALT) and will continue to assist in the progress of the reform.

Beagle Bay

Beagle Bay is located on the ALT and native title is yet to be determined. The Nyul Nyul traditional owners have been recognised as a legitimate Claim Group for the purposes of native title negotiations. Through the Regional Operations Centre (ROC), the WA State Government has provided support (financial) to the Nyul Nyul claim group in order for them to build internal governance and capacity. This investment is assisting negotiations and ensuring better outcomes for all parties.

In the meantime, issues that involve new infrastructure in the community (a potential new store and facility for small business) or a future act within the meaning of the Native Title Act will be progressed through negotiation with the traditional owners, the Corporation or entity seeking the land or building site and the holder of the land tenure.

Fitzroy Valley

The WA Government has commenced negotiations with the Bunuba traditional owners in relation to a government ILUA covering the Fitzroy Crossing Town site. The process has progressed beyond the formal exchange of letters outlining the respective claims and expectations. The negotiations have been held in good faith and mutual agreement is expected in the near future. The WA Government has provided financial support to the Bunuba Dawangarri Aboriginal Corporation to enhance internal governance process and build capacity within the corporation.

Progress towards Land tenure reform in Fitzroy Valley is seen as major achievement for the RSD project in the Kimberley.

An ILUA will increase the availability of land to address a critical shortage of accommodation for government and Non-Government Organisation (NGO) staff, in particular health professionals. Therelease of land for housing developments will also increase the opportunity for the private purchase of land and accommodation.

Halls Creek

Land tenure reform in Halls Creek is inhibited due to a complex native title claim between two traditional owner groups. The WA Government is supporting the Halls Creek Land, Housing and Heritage Advisory Board as a means to address land tenure issues and provide a medium for stakeholders to discuss and if possible, reach general agreement on issues. The Advisory Board is comprised of traditional owner representatives, state and local government representatives and the KLC as a facilitator.

The WA Government investment (through the Royalty for Regions Program) in government and NGO staff accommodation has relieved some of the immediate pressures. Work in this area will continue.

E.5 South Australia

In South Australia, both Amata and Mimili are located on the APY Lands and are subject to the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Land Rights Act 1981 (SA). Land tenure arrangements in these communities provide for limited forms of leasing including supporting government investment. Further amendments are required to facilitate commercial development and home ownership opportunities through secure and transferrable long-term lease.

 

Appendix F Projects conducted under the local research and planning project

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

There were 21 projects completed as part of the local research and planning project and they include:

Project name

Project description

Detailed population survey of Indigenous residents of Groote Eylandt and BickertonIsland

The detailed population survey of Indigenous residents was achieved by training local people in quantitative research collection and data analysis methods. The results of the project enabled the community to qualify results from the 2006 Census and to develop a local population register, important in providing a reference point for determining future service needs.

NPA RSD Visioning workshops

The ‘vision workshops were conducted in 13[122] Northern Territory RSD locations to resource and engage community members in the Local Implementation Plan (LIP) process. Locally recruited facilitators were engaged to guide the initial consultation stages underpinning the establishment of Local Reference Groups (LRGs), to identify community priorities for each of the LIPs, and to ensure that members of the community were empowered to actively participate in the workshops.

Strengthening community research on remote service delivery in community

This project was conducted in Lajamanu in two phases. Phase one included a scoping study to identify four to six Aboriginal residents who wished to be trained and work as a researcher in Lajamanu; identifying research topics through engagement with residents; and the LRG to identify priority areas of focus for the LIP and to establish a work plan and arrange logistics for Phase two of the project. Phase one was completed in June 2012. Phase two is underway and will be completed by June 2013. This phase involves the training of the researchers and the conducting of the research.

Strengthening community research on remote service delivery in community

This project was conducted in Ntaria (Hermannsburg) and involved two research projects - one on safer driving and one on community perceptions of local governance. Both projects involved training local researchers in the development of survey tools and the conducting of surveys and qualitative research.

Strengthening community research on remote service delivery in community

This project was conducted in Yuendumu and involved training four local researchers in action research to support planning, monitoring and evaluation of the LIP priorities.

Healthy Tiwi Country, Healthy Tiwi People

This project involved research to measure and report on potential economic benefits for Tiwi people in the form of carbon credits resulting through changed fire management practices. The project involved training six Tiwi Land Rangers, 12 Vocational Education Training students, and two Tiwi women in environmental research and monitoring to strengthen Tiwi fire management and develop a carbon economy prospectus.

Evaluation of the AFL Remote Regional Development Program

This participatory evaluation sought to evaluate the impact of the AFL remote regional development programme on the communities of Wadeye and the Thamarrurr region, and the effectiveness of the programme itself.

Strengthening community research on RSD: Change factors and priorities for community development of LIPs at Amata and Mimili

Recruited and trained 16 local community members from Amata and Mimili to monitor and evaluate progress against priorities in their respective LIPs.

Attitudinal Community Survey

NPY Women's Council carried out an attitudinal survey to gain qualitative information on community awareness and behaviours around issues including nutrition, violence and education.

 

Three other projects that fell under the local research and planning projects but were funded by other sources included:

  • Provision of Community Planning Services: this project was conducted in Mornington Island and Doomadgee to facilitate a community visioning and action planning programme to develop community LIPs. The project was funded by the Mt Isa ROC.
  • Community Safety Action Plan: this project was conducted in Mornington Island and Doomadgee and was funded by the Attorney-General’s Department, the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, and Mt Isa ROC.
  • A Services Research Project was conducted in 2011 to create a comprehensive inventory of all services being delivered to Bardi Jawi communities, Beagle Bay, Fitzroy Valley and Halls Creek communities in the Kimberley region. The project included the regularity of services and some indication of uptake in community. A small sampling of local community perspectives about service delivery was also undertaken.

 

Appendix G Local Reference Group and LIP process by community

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Community

Local Reference Group[123]

Community consultation process[124]

Angurugu

The Angurugu Local Reference Group. Itsmembers are people from across different clan groups, genders, age groups and areas.

The Angurugu Local Implementation Plan (LIP) is based on the agreed commitments in the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement Stage 2.

Galiwin’ku

The Galiwin’ku Local Reference Group was established to set priorities to improve the quality of life in its community.

The Galiwin’ku Local Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer (IEO) and the Government Business Manager (GBM).

Gunbalanya

Gunbalanya Local Reference Group, known as the Arrguluk Reference Group.

The Arrguluk Reference Group set out the priorities for the Gunbalanya community and included targets, actions, success measures and timelines for achieving those priorities.

Gapuwiyak

The Mala Leaders Group

The Mala Leaders Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Lajamanu

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Maningrida

Maningrida Local Reference Group

The Maningrida LIP was drafted to include priorities under each building block that were identified by the ManingridaLocal Reference Group through discussion and consultation with community members, traditional owners and stakeholders.
TheManingrida Government Engagement Coordinator (GEC) and IEO supported this process.

Milingimbi

The Milingimbi Local Reference Group

The Milingimbi Local Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

Wurrumiyanga Local Reference Group. Itsmembers are community people from across different clans, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Wurrumiyanga.

The Wurrumiyanga Local Reference Group set the community priorities for the Wurrumiyanga LIP. To do this it consulted with clan groups, participated in capacity-building workshops and took advice from community members with experience in service delivery.
With support from the IEO and GBM, the Wurrumiyanga Local Reference Group consulted traditional owners and sought their agreement on the various community issues in the plan.

Ngukurr

The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation

The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation had support from the IEO and the GBM to turn their pre-existing plan (Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan) into the Ngukurr LIP.

Numbulwar

Numburindi Community Reference Group

The Numburindi Community Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

Wurla Nyinta Reference Group

The Wurla Nyinta Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Wadeye

Members of the pre-existing social group Thamarrurr Incorporated also served as the Wadeye Local Reference Group.

Thamarrurr Incorporated established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Yirrkala

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block by taking suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the IEO and the GBM.

Yuendumu

Yuendumu Local Reference Group. Itsmembers are community people from across the different language groups, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Yuendumu.

The Yuendumu Local Reference Group set the community priorities for the Yuendumu LIP by consulting with language groups, participating in capacity-building workshops and taking advice from community members with experience in service delivery.
Withsupport from the IEO and the GBM, the Yuendumu Local Reference Group consulted traditional owners and sought their agreement on the various community issues in the plan.

Umbakumba

Umbakumba Local Reference Group. Itsmembers included people from across the different clans, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Umbakumba. The GBM, IEO and Anindilyakwa Land Council support the Local Reference Group.

The Umbakumba LIP is based on the agreed commitments in the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement Stage 2.

Aurukun

Aurukun Shire Council

The community were involved in the process through a series of workshops and meetings held with individuals, clan groups and trusts in the community.
The community worked together with service providers who provided some feedback and data to the community to ensure that the items in the Accord aligned with the needs of the community.

Coen

 

A series of workshops and meetings were held with individuals, clans groups and trusts in the community. Service providers also shared information with the groups.

Doomadgee

Building Block Reference Groups

The Doomadgee LIP developed out of a series of conversations some of which have continued for many years through Negotiation Tables with government about issues facing the community.
It was important to acknowledge prior community perspectives and achievements, and barriers along the way, in order to build on this. The commitment of three key partners (community, service providers and government) to actively engage and contribute has been vital.
The LIP process involved multiple conversations with diverse people and groups in the community.

Hope Vale

Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council

The Accord (the name of the LIP in the Cape York Communities) was developed over time, using the previous Local Indigenous Planning Agreements (developed as part of the Cape York Welfare Reform trial) and negotiation tables as a base.
The local priorities and actions to this Accord are set against the seven Council of Australian Governments (COAG) building blocks, demonstrating Hope Vale’s commitment to the objectives of Closing the Gap on Indigenous disadvantage and recognising it as a vehicle to pursue a better life in Hope Vale.
Through the refresh process it is planned to promote the Accord through different groups to raise awareness of existing achievements and gather community input for the refreshed version.

Mornington Island

Building Block Reference Groups

The Mornington Island LIP has developed out of very similar processes to those of Doomadgee.
The LIP engagement process has evolved from an initial process of talking to a range of community members, clan and family groups, and local organisations; and through Men’s Yarning Circles, Women’s Yarning Circles, meetings of local service providers, and engagement of governments at all levels: i.e. Mornington Shire Council, QueenslandGovernment and Australian Government.

Mossman Gorge

Bamanga Bubu Ngadimunku Inc. (BBN)

Bamanga Bubu Ngadimunku (BBN), the elected community representative body in Mossman Gorge led the development of the Accord at the community level, while the Cairns Regional Operations Centre (ROC) negotiated with responsible agencies and local service providers.
BBN facilitated community forums while Cairns ROC engaged with local services through six weekly service coordination meetings.

Beagle Bay

Beagle Bay has been without a community council since 2004. This provided the ROC with space to begin a new approach. Existing governance structures within the community were targeted to begin the new approach process. The School Board, the Health Committee, the Women’s Group and Traditional Owners were the first to be engaged. Local Community Reference Groups were established for each of the Building Blocks as a way to progress actions within the LIP.

The Local Operations Centre (Local Area Coordinator and IEO) encouraged community participation and engagement through community workshops, power point presentations, community surveys carried out by community volunteers, flyers, one-on-one formal and informal discussions and a workshop with the high school students.
The Local Community Reference Groups are consulted regularly about progress against LIP actions.
Reports on LIP progress are prepared by the Local Operations Centre and tailored to each group.

Fitzroy Valley

Fitzroy Valley Futures Forum Governing Committee and sub committees

A workshop was held to set terms and conditions of engagement, and a day meeting to clarify and confirm plan priorities. Health specific community workshops and Service Provider Round Tables were also held.
The Fitzroy Futures Forum and their eight sub-committees meet each quarter to discuss priorities and services. The Local Operations Centre supports these governance structures.

Halls Creek

Halls Creek Advisory Group and
Halls Creek Community Forum

A review of prior community consultations was conducted.
This was followed by: community workshops to determine a list of priorities under each building block; household surveys; and one-on-one interviews with Indigenous and non-Indigenous community members and representatives from government and non-government organisations.
Further, a community solutions workshop facilitated an opportunity to design solutions for agreed priorities. The Local Operations Centre conducted weekly meetings with community groups to keep community members informed about progress.

Bardi Jawi

Bardi Jawi communities: Ardyaloon, Djarindjin and Lombadina.
Ardyaloon Aboriginal Corporation. Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation. Lombadina Aboriginal Corporation.
Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate.

Priorities and projects were developed from three sources:
i) meetings with community members - including meetings with representatives of the Councils of Ardyaloon, Djarindjin and Lombadina, the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate;
ii) existing strategic documents: the Bardi Jawi Nimidamun (2008‑ 2010); Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation Strategic Objectives; the Aboriginal Justice Agreement for Ardyaloon; and the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan for Kullarri Regional CDEP Inc., and Ardyaloon Inc.
iii) Economic Development Plan agency meetings. Service briefings, governance workshops and community reports generated by the Local Operations Centre have also assisted consultation around LIP priorities and actions.

Amata

The pre-existing Amata Community Council Inc. which is an elected representative body, acted as the Local Reference Group which ultimately signed off on the LIP.

A consultant was engaged to help implement and develop the community engagement process and to develop the LIP.
Topics included Closing the Gap, the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement, and the LIP.
The Amata Community Council was involved throughout the development of the LIP. A workshop was conducted.
The ROC also facilitated individual building block workshops in relation to the LIP.
The ROC formed a Communications Team to ensure the community engagement process was as thorough and effective as possible.

Mimili

The pre-existing Mimili Community Council Inc., which is an elected representative body, acted as the Local Reference Group which ultimately signed off on the LIP.

Essentially the same process as per Amata’s (above) was adopted in Mimili, through the Mimili Community Council.

Walgett

 

Several consultations were held with the Walgett community to inform a first draft of the LIP.
These were followed by a series of workshops.
Members for the Community Working Party (CWP) were involved in most stages of the LIP process.

Wilcannia

 

A similar process was adopted in Wilcannia as per Walgett’s.
The RSD team held community BBQs for the Mallee Mission, Warrali Mission and Wilcannia township to talk about the RSD and LIP. A series of workshops were held.
The LIP was agreed to by the CWP.

 

Appendix H Dates of agreement of Local Implementation Plans by community

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

Community (State)

Date LIP agreed or equivalent local agreement

Walgett (NSW)

17 August 2010

Wilcannia (NSW)

20 August 2010

Aurukun (QLD)

November 2011

Coen (QLD)

26 June 2013

Doomadgee (QLD)

26 July 2010

Hope Vale (QLD)

12 December 2012

Mornington Island (QLD)

28 July 2010

Mossman Gorge (QLD)

18 March 2013

Amata (SA)

30 June 2010

Mimili (SA)

01 July 2010

Bardi Jawi (WA)

08 November 2010

Beagle Bay (WA)

19 September 2010

Fitzroy Valley (WA)

15 September 2010

Halls Creek (WA)

24 September 2010

Angurugu (NT)

03 December 2010[125]

Galiwin’ku (NT)

09 March 2011

Gapuwiyak (NT)

14 March 2011

Gunbalanya (NT)

10 November 2010

Lajamanu (NT)

17 March 2011

Maningrida (NT)

12 April 2013

Milingimbi (NT)

11 March 2011

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu) (NT)

18 January 2013

Ngukurr (NT)

21 April 2011

Ntaria (Hermannsburg) (NT)

02 March 2011

Numbulwar (NT)

03 March 2011

Umbakumba (NT)

03 December 2010[126]

Wadeye (NT)

10 June 2011

Yirrkala (NT)

08 December 2010

Yuendumu (NT)

10 February 2011

 

Appendix I Key achievements for Remote Service Delivery locations

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

The following tables provide some of the key achievements for each priority location since the commencement of the NPA RSD to generally June 30 2013. The right hand column identifies if the key achievement was identified as a LIP action and if it was supported by one of the key NPAs, RPAs or other initiatives discussed in Section 2.6 and Appendix J or was funded by the Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account (IRSD SA). The key achievements listed in the tables below do not include all achievements as activities are still continuing in each community to the end of the NPARSD.

I.1 New South Wales - key achievements

Walgett

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Twenty three (23) new houses and 81 refurbishments completed under National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH) as at 30 September 2013.

NPARIH

‘Manage Your Income’ workshop for social housing tenants held in May 2012. Topics included budget management, information on bank accounts and Centapay.

LIP

Implemented a tenant support pilot programme, which incorporates key modules of the ‘Rent it Keep it’ programme. Fifteen Happy Health Homes Packs provided to Aboriginal tenant participants of the programme.

LIP

Improved thermal capacity of social housing properties through insulation, whirly birds and ceiling fans.

NPARIH

Schooling

 

Aboriginal Knowledge and Practice Centre programme established in schools.

LIP

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was developed in consultation with Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) to deliver health services in the school.

LIP

Upgrade of Playground Soft-Fall (playground matting) at St Joseph’s Primary School.

IRSD SA

Upgrade of the Gingie Community hub which now operates a breakfast club and a homework centre.

IRSD SA

Walgett Community College staff and senior school students participated in a grief and loss workshop.

 

Coordinated health checks for primary school students are operational.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Walgett Community College High School received funding for the Walgett Trade Training Centre to deliver qualifications in construction, engineering and hospitality.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Families as First Teachers (FaFT) - Indigenous Parenting Support Services (IPSS) Early Childhood Worker in Walgett visits playgroups and parenting groups.

 

Introduction of KidsMatter Early Childhood improvement framework via the Early Childhood Reference Group.

 

Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) - funded playgroup operating at Birralegal preschool.

 

‘Yarn Up’ community information sessions on the health and well-being of children birth to three years of age.

LIP

Health check days in April and June 2012 for children birth to three years, targeting families who are not accessing health and immunisation services.

LIP

‘Did Ya Know’ project supporting young Aboriginal mums commenced.

 

‘Parenting Through Sport’ events delivered at Walgett. 39 parent carers and 45 children attended over 3 events.

 

Growing Up Strong Gamilaraay Baby book photo shoot September 2012.

LIP

Improved coordination of early childhood services under the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care.

LIP

Through Young Black Eyes train the trainer programme is being delivered in Walgett.

LIP

Health

 

Renal unit established at Walgett Hospital. First patient treated February 2011.

LIP

WAMs capacity building funded under the Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes National Partnership (Indigenous Chronic Disease Package). Multi-discipline Health Care Centre for Treatment and Prevention of Chronic Disease was officially opened on 20 September 2013. WAMS audit of Walgett mental health services completed.

Indigenous Chronic Disease Package

Drug and alcohol coordinator for Walgett is now funded.

 

Aboriginal child and maternal health services funded under the Healthy for Life Program.

 

Joint Australian and NSW Government Review of medical accommodation model.

LIP

Aboriginal Health Impact Statement (AHIS) embedded into all Western NSW Local Health District policy.

 

Permanent appointment of a Health Service Manager in Walgett Health Service November 2012. Walgett health service nurse practitioner recruited 2012. Appointment of a Child and Family Health Nurse.

 

Activity-based mobility programme incorporated into social support/day programme.

 

MOU signed between NSW Government Local Area Health Network and WAMS to facilitate greater cooperation andcoordination.

 

Safe Communities

 

Walgett Family Violence Prevention Plan is finalised.

LIP

Alcohol restrictions have been enforced since October 2010.

 

Friday night and Saturday sport and recreational activities for school aged children to encourage safe and healthy youth activities. This activity employs four casual Indigenous youth Workers and supports local volunteers.

LIP, IRSD SA

Walgett Mobile Police Van due for delivery mid-December 2013. The van will be operational during both school term and school holidays as well as on weekends when required.

LIP, IRSD SA

Purchase of sporting equipment to promote participation in sport by the aged and disabled.

LIP, IRSD SA

Over 400 players and their families participated in the 2011–2012 Walgett Aboriginal Knockout. This event included the establishment of the Tackling Violence Program.

IRSD SA

Youth services mapping completed in Walgett.

 

Economic participation

 

Skills Audit and Employment Expo held 22 June 2011.

LIP

Twelve trainees commenced a 9-month Certificate II Agriculture at “Merriman” Shearing School in September 2011. Anumber of these trainees have now graduated from this programme.

 

Community garden established, 12 CDEP participants undertaking a Cert II in Horticulture.

LIP

Laundromat is operational and staff have secured supply contracts with local motels.

LIP

Feasibility studies into economic development opportunities completed.

LIP

Employment of Country Rugby League Coordinator to help develop pathways for Indigenous youth from school toemployment.

 

Nine participants in the Certificate III in Early Childhood Services and three graduates from the Walgett TCC Certificate I in Building and Construction, with six other participants going onto full-time employment.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

The Murdi Paaki Young Leaders programme established and actively involved in the community.

LIP, Murdi Paaki RPA

Walgett Gamilaraay Aboriginal Community Working Party (CWP) meetings held monthly and Aboriginal Affairs NSW funded secretariat positions for both Walgett and Wilcannia. Walgett secretariat is employed directly by AboriginalAffairs.

LIP

The Walgett Gamilaraay-Yuwaalaraay Community Language Program has supported language revival.

LIP

Part-time Walgett Indigenous Cultural Development Officer secured for Aboriginal Artists development.

 

Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) delivered by the Dharriwaa Elders Group.

LIP

Support provided to the Dharriwaa Elders Group to produce their Yundiboo newsletter.

LIP, IRSD SA

Upgrade of the Namoi and Gingie Community Hubs. This project will allow communities a safe environment to participate in local events and community services.

LIP, IRSD SA

 

Wilcannia

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Eleven (11) new homes and 65 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

New Safe House opened in October 2011 (Women’s Refuge Movement) including 1 x 3 bedroom Transitional Housing dwellings and 2 x 3 bedroom Existing Housing dwellings.

LIP

Installation of air cooling units in 77 Indigenous homes and four units in the Wilcannia Women’s Refuge. Two qualified Aboriginal plumbers were employed and one Aboriginal plumbing apprentice.

LIP

RSPCA clinics and community education delivered on pet care. Three people employed locally to conduct communitysurveys.

LIP, IRSD SA

The Home Power Saving Program introduced in Wilcannia with 46 households taking advantage of the scheme, 39 of these being Aboriginal.

LIP

Increased seating has been installed throughout the town.

LIP

Schooling

 

Attendance rates have increased at Wilcannia Central School. Tutorial programme offered at Wilcannia Central School seeks to re-engage children who have not been attending school.

LIP, IRSD SA

Strengthened Aboriginal Education Consultative Group and School partnership has achieved greater community and parental engagement.

 

Full-time Wellbeing Officer employed at St. Theresa’s School.

LIP, IRSD SA

Introduction of seven new school based traineeships.

 

The Healthy Foods Program operates at St Therese’s Catholic school and Wilcannia Central School.

LIP, IRSD SA

Vocational Training courses offered through the local TAFE include Hospitality (12 enrolments) and Cert. III Early Childhood Education (17 enrolments).

 

Aboriginal Community Engagement Officer employed to improve school attendance.

LIP

A cool room was installed at Wilcannia Central School.

LIP, IRSD SA

Five Wilcannia Central School students participated in the production of five oral history films and a media excursion to Sydney.

 

Australian Community Education College (ACEC) Aspiration Trip to Sydney - Parents and carers training in Children’s Services travel to Sydney to build their capacity in their community and industry. Very successful and well attended.

LIP

ACEC Aspiration Trip to Sydney - Parents and carers training in Children’s Services travelled to Sydney to build their capacity in their community and industry.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centre (TTC), funding for the Reaching Across Secondary Program Trade Training Centre has included an upgrade of hospitality facilities at Wilcannia Central School.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Intensive Supported Playgroups and Indigenous Parenting Support Services delivered.

LIP

Upgrades to playgroup infrastructure at St. Therese’s Community School are now complete.

LIP, IRSD SA

Transition to school programmes strengthened.

LIP

Healthy Start programme in place for mothers & babies.

LIP

One hundred per cent (100%) of 3 to 4 year olds enrolled in licensed preschool service.

 

Early Childhood Reference Group (ECRG) operational and oversees the introduction of KidsMatter Early Childhood improvement framework.

LIP

Development of Early Childhood service ‘roadmap’ for families.

LIP

Aboriginal Child Youth and Family Growing Up Really Strong Barkaandji Baby Books developed and launched. Project finalist for Premiers Award 2012.

LIP

‘Parenting Through Sport’ events. 53 children and 21 parents/carers attended over two sessions.

 

Scoping project commenced for the Wilcannia Early Childhood Hub and Belonging Centre.

LIP

Health

 

Enhanced drug and alcohol services now provided and fortnightly mental health clinics established for people with cannabis or alcohol issues.

LIP

Regular visits from a Dietician, Paediatrician, GP/Obstetrician and Addictions Physician.

LIP

Audiology screening for children at both schools is now available.

LIP

Child dental programme in place.

 

Healthy Start programme for new mums in hospital or on return to the community established.

.

Tele-radiology service established.

 

In early 2012 water drinking fountains were installed at Baker Park and in front of the Community Hall in Wilcannia.

 

Social Support groups established.

 

Increased funding for the Community access bus.

LIP

Maari Ma Health Aboriginal Service employed three local people as Aboriginal Health Worker trainees, increasing the capacity of the workforce to deliver antenatal care. Two have successfully completed the traineeship and have continued employment with Maari Ma. The third trainee resigned and gained employment as a youth worker at WingsYouth Drop-In Centre.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Community Safety Plan finalised in September 2011.

LIP

Domestic Violence protocols implemented in mid-2011.

LIP

Youth Justice Conferencing introduced in mid-2011.

 

Community Safety Officer Attendance Program available at schools.

 

Alcohol restrictions established.

LIP

Wilcannia Men’s Shed is established and operational.

LIP, IRSD SA

Wings Drop-In Centre now employs a full-time and trainee youth worker, sport, computer equipment; and educational and cultural resources were also acquired for the Centre.

LIP, IRSD SA

Establishment of Tackling Violence Program.

LIP

Youth services mapping completed in Wilcannia. Youth service delivery forum scheduled for early 2014.

 

Murdi Paaki Aboriginal Young Leaders (Murdi Paaki Region Project) includes seven participants from Wilcannia

LIP

Economic participation

 

Literacy Campaign Pilot completed. Three participants gained employment, five enrolled in further studies and two were already employed at the time of course commencement. The Pilot engaged three Community Facilitators, two of which gained employment since completing the course.

LIP, IRSD SA

Installation of new play equipment, BBQ and picnic tables at Baker Park.

LIP, IRSD SA

Feasibility studies into economic development opportunities in Wilcannia completed.

LIP

Ten participants in Certificate III in Children’s Services and Certificate II in Building and Construction underway with participants working on local construction projects.

LIP

Business Manager/Coordinator engaged at the Wilcannia Radio Station to mentor and build the capacity of the locally recruited Station Supervisor for a 12 month period.

IRSD SA

Governance & Leadership

 

Establishment of the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program - Wilcannia Future Leaders Group.

LIP, Murdi Paaki RPA

Website established for Wilcannia River Radio station and Operation of Two Rivers FM, the local Indigenous radiostation.

LIP, IRSD SA

Wilcannia Community Working Party meetings held monthly and supported by a Secretariat.

LIP, Murdi Paaki RPA

The Lower Darling Language Centre supports Paakantyi/Barkindji language revival amongst all age-groups within the community through its programmes.

 

Work commenced on the much anticipated Elders space at the Wilcannia Home Care Building, June 2013. OFTA provided Elders support funding to the elders group for operations in 2012–13 and 2013–14. $25,000 per year. National Jobs Package - one Position part time to assist the elders 2012–2013.

LIP, IRSD SA

I.2 Queensland - key achievements

Aurukun

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Thirty one (31) new houses and 67 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

$4.2 million to develop 24 lots to support future housing construction in Aurukun.

LIP

Under Cape York Welfare Reform (CYWR)168 households enrolled to participate in Pride of Place programme.

CYWR

Under NPARIH, a total of 22,581 employment hours have been submitted for 2012–13 and of this, 15,041 hours or67% were undertaken by Indigenous employees.

NPARIH

Schooling

 

Cape York Australian Aboriginal Academy (CYAAA) was funded under PaCE to support activities in the school targeting the development of parent capacity to engage with education.

LIP, CYWR

Primary school attendance has increased. A 24.8% increase in school attendance has occurred since Term 1 2008.

LIP, CYWR

Two students supported by Transition Support Services (TSS) were accepted into scholarships.

 

Fifteen to16 Year seven students have completed applications to boarding school and families are very cooperative.

 

Student Education Trusts continue to be well utilised and are a good way for parents to put money aside for any educational expenses that arise for their child. There are a total of 239 children with trusts as at 30June2012.

LIP, CYWR

Early Childhood

 

New Direction mothers and babies programme is being delivered by Apunipima Cape York Health Council Cape York Health Council and is providing better access to antenatal care.

LIP, IECD NPA

The Parenting Program through Cape York Partnerships has 42 participants registered.

LIP, CYWR

The Koolkan Early Childhood Centre and Family Support Hub is currently operating successfully through the Aurukun Shire Council and is at full capacity. 89 children are enrolled, and attendance is 95% in Pre-Prep, 95% in kindy and 25% in the baby room. It also offers a playgroup five days a week.

LIP

A Childs Safe House, operated by ‘ACT 4 Kids’, has been successfully providing a safe place for children under child protection orders in Aurukun.

 

Health

 

Wellbeing centre established to deliver integrated, community based and culturally appropriate social services addressing drug, alcohol, domestic violence, gambling and social/emotional wellbeing issues.

LIP, CYWR

The construction of a new Home and Community Care (HACC) facility offering day respite care for the community’s elderly is now complete and fully operational with a full-time HACC coordinator employed.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

A Community Safety Plan is under development.

LIP

The women’s shelter has been re-opened and operating well.

LIP

A Childs Safe House is operating and managed through ‘ACT 4 Kids’. The house provides a safe place for children under child protection orders.

LIP

The Men’s Group, Wik Warriors, has been successfully operating in Aurukun with approximately 40 regular members

 

Economic participation

 

Funding provided to refurbish the Aurukun Wik and Kugu Arts Centre.

LIP

Community upgrades including the construction of a war memorial, upgrade to the sporting precinct and development of a new cemetery. The war memorial was completed for ANZAC Day 2013 and upgrades to the oval and cemetery will commence in the 2014 dry season.

LIP, IRSD SA

Bowenda Drive landscaping/concreting project was delivered extensive training to local people.

 

Development of new business precinct completed in March 2013, and the Kan Kan Café and Aurukun laundry is nowoperational.

LIP, CYWR

There are currently 583 MPower clients (financial education management programme).

LIP, CYWR

Rollout of NPARIH has included training and up skilling programmes, sustainable employment outcomes and the establishment of supporting business ventures. Council & Career Employment Australia (CEA) have 15 people shortlisted for apprenticeships, and the Council contracts out the concrete batching plant.

NPARIH

APN Cape York is an organisation established for and owned by the community. APN is currently exploring the potential of a joint venture construction company that would, amongst other projects tender for NPARIH construction and upgrade works. APN is the biggest employer of full time local Aboriginal people in Aurukun.

 

The ladies sewing group in Aurukun is working with Balkanu to develop and sustain a retail outlet in the new Business Precinct. They have opened the shop front.

 

A local apprentice working for Aurukun Shire Council completed his plumbing apprenticeship on 31 December 2012, the first apprenticeship completed by an Aurukun community member.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

The Aurukun Shire Business Plan and land use plan are under development.

 

Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) workshop has been successfully completed, with Stage 1 completed from 26-27 March 2013 and Stage 2 completed from 29-30 April 2013.

LIP

 

Coen

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Three new houses completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Home and Community Care (HACC) provider purchased land for the 2013 construction of a service facility ($1.7m)

 

March 2013 - The transfer of ownership of 15 houses and three duplexes from the Coen Regional Aboriginal Corporation to the Qld Department of Housing and Public Works has occurred and they are now managed under onesocial housing policy.

 

2012–13 Land analysis for current and future sites completed across Coen land at the school was offered by the QldDepartment of Education, Training and Employment to be considered for a future home ownership programme. FaHCSIA funding confirmed for survey and sub-division work.

LIP

The Centre for Appropriate Technology (CAT) has developed an extensive audit of services required for Coen’s outstations, including all water and waste management issues and road maintenance schedule for access roads.

 

Schooling

 

Cape York Aboriginal Australian Academy (CYAAA) funded in Coen.

CYWR

The historically high level of school attendance in Coen has been maintained, with rates higher than the average for Indigenous students and similar to the state-wide attendance rate for all students. A new school principal commenced in March 2013.

 

Early Childhood

 

Funds secured for the Coen Kindergarten Assoc. for its Limited Hours Care Service until 31 December 2013.

 

Delivery of Indigenous Parenting Support Services and Locational Supported Playgroups.

 

As at 30 September 2013, 22 parents have signed up to the Cape York Partnerships parenting programme ‘It takes a village to raise a child’ with strong attendance at the Baby College, Positive Kids and Strong Families programmes.

CYWR

Health

 

Wellbeing centre established to deliver integrated, community based and culturally appropriate social services addressing drug, alcohol, domestic violence, gambling and social/emotional wellbeing issues.

CYWR

Apunipima Cape York Health Council has established a clinic delivering a family centred approach to Primary Health Care. Focusing on prevention and working in partnership with the Royal Flying Doctors Service (RFDS) and Queensland Health.

LIP

It was agreed that there will be one health body in the community. This will be run through Apunipima Cape York Health Council with support from RFDS.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

The Remote Area Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Care Advisory Assoc. (RAATSICC) employed two staff in2012 to provide advice and support to families to access quality social service provision.

 

A Community Safety Plan has been developed and was signed off on 26 June 2013 by the newly established Coen Regional Aboriginal Corporation Board. On 17 July, the first community safety meeting for implementation was held.

LIP

2013 funding has been secured to provide residential accommodation for additional police in Coen.

 

Economic participation

 

Extensive upgrade to the Coen airstrip in late 2010 ensured vital transport links to and from Coen.

 

Administrative and training centre completed in July 2011.

 

Two Coen Indigenous entrepreneurs have established a hire car service, with the assistance of Balkanu Cape York Development Corp, and Indigenous Business Australia (IBA).

 

Purchase of the Coen Homestead Guesthouse by an Indigenous company in late 2010 has led to increased Indigenous employment and training opportunities in hospitality and tourism.

 

2012–13 The Wunthulpu Tourist Centre is lodging a submission to the Queensland Government for funding toupgrade the centre to become a fully operational gallery and café.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

A Coen Sport and Recreation group was established in mid–2012

 

In November 2007 the Coen Regional Aboriginal Corporation (CRAC) went into voluntary administration. In2013,CRAC held a General Meeting on 16 April 2013 and elected a new board. The deed of corporation was finalised on 24July and the control of the organisation was handed back to the Board of Directors.

LIP

CRAC is holding a two-day governance and leadership workshop to be facilitated in September 2013.

LIP

 

Hope Vale

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixteen new houses and 114 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

$1.5m to develop 10 lots to support future housing construction.

NPARIH

Upgrade to water and sewerage systems completed.

LIP

Three FaHCSIA staff houses have been completed.

 

A social housing and infrastructure working group was established in July 2012 and has reported approx. 80% local full-time employment in building and construction works.

LIP, NPARIH

The first person in Queensland to buy a home in their traditional community with the assistance of an IBA home loan at Hope Valley Estate. Nine contracts for sale of land at Hope Valley Estate have been completed.

LIP

Tenancy arrangements were entered into with all social housing tenants as per the requirements of the QldResidential Tenancies and Rooming Act 2008.

LIP

Upgrades completed to the water reticulation infrastructure.

LIP

Schooling

 

New Primary School Principal is building strong relationships with attendance case managers and commenced dailymeetings in Term 1, 2013.

LIP

Family Responsibilities Commission (FRC) commenced meeting with Cooktown High Deputy Principal and other key stakeholders regularly in 2013 and has established an accurate list of unenrolled students in Hope Vale to target enrolling all unenrolled children.

CYWR

In July 2013, an eight week re-engagement programme commenced. The programme was held at the Wellbeing Centre and involved parents, PaCE and Wellbeing staff. Throughout the programme disengaged youth attended school three days per week and spent two days in community with service providers. A project officer was recruited inJanuary 2013 to deliver the PaCE project, working towards the development of the Hope Vale Community Education Strategic Plan. A PaCE coordinator is in place to engage parents in their children’s education.

LIP

The Local Program Office adopted a prep class at the primary school and the IEO has been actively involved inbirthdays and presentations.

 

Upgrades to School oval (through CDEP Strategic Projects) and the Police Community Youth Club (PCYC) hall completed in April 2013.

 

A 4% increase in school attendance occurred between Term 1, 2008 to Term 1, 2012.

LIP,CYWR

All staff, including Indigenous staff from Hope Vale Primary School have been provided with professional development at the start of every term to enable them to deliver direct instruction. The school is currently assisting two teacher’s aides to achieve a Certificate IV in Education.

LIP, CYWR

The Cape York Australian Aboriginal Academy (CYAAA) was rolled out in Hope Vale State School in December 2012.

LIP, CYWR

An oval in the sporting precinct has been completed.

LIP

Early Childhood

 

Indigenous Parenting Support Services and Locational Supported Playgroup delivered in the community sinceFebruary 2012.

LIP

Upgrades to childcare centre completed in September 2011 and two Indigenous trainees working in centre.

LIP

Student Education Trusts continue to be well utilised.

CYWR

Blue Card (working with children) application process better understood and more accessible following visit byCommission for Children and Young People in April 2013.

LIP

Cooktown Child Safety arranged a function in Cooktown for foster and kinship carers in the Cooktown Cluster area tocelebrate foster and kinship care week on 9 March 2013. A Child Safety Information session is being delivered inlate August 2013 to complement a Child Safety Community Awareness project being delivered at the same time.

LIP

Child health 0 to 4 years; including immunisations and child health checks are offered Monday through to Wednesday at the clinic.

LIP

In Hope Vale, a cultural awareness session was delivered in mid–February 2013 by the Hope Vale Indigenous Knowledge Centre and attended by staff from the Cooktown District Community Centre and Child Safety.

LIP

A day care and separate kindergarten facility is in place and operating successfully.

LIP

Health

 

Wellbeing Centre established to deliver integrated, community based and culturally appropriate social services addressing drug, alcohol, domestic violence, gambling and social/emotional wellbeing issues.

LIP, CYWR

HACC/Disabilities facility completed in September 2013.

LIP

New Director of Nursing and Midwifery for Hope Vale commenced. Intention is to improve systems and services tobemore efficient and effective, and to achieve better health outcomes for the Hope Vale community.

LIP

A six unit Independent Living Precinct providing accommodation for up to 12 people was constructed and officially opened on 29 June 2012.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Animal Management Officer in place.

 

New men’s shed funding secured and shed construction completed June 2013.

LIP

Hope Vale Men’s and Women’s groups are being held regularly at the Wellbeing Centre.

LIP

Multi-purpose hall/category 5 cyclone shelter construction was completed in December 2013.

 

Community Safety Plan developed, endorsed and implemented. A Community Safety Committee hasbeenestablished.

LIP

Child Safety Information Sessions and Child Safety Awareness Project to occur commencing August 2013.

LIP

The Hope Vale Community Justice Group (JAG) was reinvigorated and supported to understand legislation membership requirements and develop capacity to respond to legislative responsibilities.

LIP

Economic participation

 

New housing construction projects have given local community members opportunities to build on contractingbusinesses.

 

Dam construction for the banana farm was completed in December 2012.

CYWR

Business precinct completed in July 2012.

CYWR

Retail Precinct refurbishment underway and due for completion in December 2013.

LIP, IRSD SA

Banana Farm operational, approximately 25 staff on the ground.

LIP, IRSD SA

A key handover ceremony for the first local home owner at Hope Valley Estate occurred on 28 May 2013. Home ownership workshops were also held in Cooktown and Hope Vale from 24-26 June 2013. As at December 2013, atotal of 13 lots were locally owned, with nine contracts of sale completed for lots at Hope Valley Estate. Currently there are six new privately owned houses under construction.

LIP

 

Transport and Main Roads have flagged preparing a strategy and commencing final sealing of Endeavour Valley Road between Cooktown and Hope Vale as a highlight of the 2013–14 State Road plan.

LIP

Hope Vale Building and Construction Mentor Program employed a full-time builder to train and mentor local staff.

LIP

Construction of the BMX track and sporting oval in Hope Vale were completed in April 2013.

LIP

Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council has secured a grant for a $4.5m multi-purpose hall that will complete the sporting precinct component. Construction commenced in 2013 and is due for completion in approximately November 2013.

LIP

Governance and Leadership

 

Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) held in April 2013.

 

Youth Strategy developed to be implemented in second half of 2013.

LIP

Youth Engagement Plan drafted and endorsed by Hope Vale Aboriginal Shire Council in preparation for a Youth Summit on 25 September 2013.

LIP

Hope Vale Oral and Community History Projects are underway.

LIP

 

Mossman Gorge

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Bamanga Bubu Ngadimunku (BBN) has signed an agreement to lease all the social housing on the freehold portion ofthe community to the Queensland Government. This will see all the housing in the community managed under OneSocial Housing. This agreement will also see the community subdivided and the municipal infrastructure upgraded and handed over to the mainstream shire council to manage. Once complete, housing and municipal service delivery in Mossman Gorge will be ‘normalized’.

LIP

All houses numbered to allow identification by emergency services. After the ‘normalization’ process, each house willhave its own electricity and water meter and mailbox.

LIP

Schooling

Coordinated attendance and behaviour plan in place at the school, with the Attendance Case Manager, Wellbeing Centre, Parenting Program staff, Government Coordination Officer and Families Responsibilities Commission working together to improve school attendance and behaviour.

LIP, CYWR

School attendance has remained steady at over 70% (2013).

LIP

New resource centre and library is operational at Mossman State School.

 

Mossman Gorge Training Centre is now connected to high speed internet.

 

A 20 bed residential training facility is now in operation at Mossman Gorge Training Centre. Graduates from the training centre are all being placed in work.

 

Parents in Mossman Gorge are engaged in the children’s schooling and for the Term 1 2013 school meet and greet, all primary and one half of high school parents attended. A homework centre has been established at the Wellbeing Centre in collaboration with the PCYC. Up to 15 students (approximately 70% of school students) have beenattending.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program, Mossman State High School is a partner in the MarineTech Trade Training Centre, providing marine industry training facilities in Cairns.

TTC

Early Childhood

Playgroups for under-fives are provided three times a week in Mossman Primary School. Mossman Gorge parents have been accessing this service regularly. Mossman Gorge children also access mainstream early childhood services in Mossman township.

LIP

Baby College and Parenting/Strong Families support programmes are now being delivered in the community.

 

GoodStart Early Learning Centre in Mossman provides access to Quality Early Learning Programs.

 

The Mossman Gorge parenting support programme provides Mossman Gorge residents with direct access toparenting support programmes and harnesses natural leadership around parents in the community and the care oftheir children. This programme has performed very well in the first half of 2013 and supported more families thaninallof 2012.

 

Education sessions in Mossman Gorge are being provided to parents and families. The sessions have addressed issues such as: at-risk behaviours during pregnancy, Foetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder, nutrition and parenting skills.

LIP

Health

The Apunipima Cape York Health Council Health Clinic has Australian General Practice Accreditation.

 

The Mossman Primary Health Clinic has become more of a service hub for not only the Mossman Gorge community but for the surrounding region including Indigenous residents from the Mossman township. Over 90% of the 200-plus clients, who use the clinic, use it regularly as their first choice for health care.

LIP

The Health Clinic has acquired the services of Australian Hearing Health.

 

The Community Health Plan has been implemented.

 

The Chronic Kidney Disease Clinic commenced at Mossman Hospital on 26 April 2012.

 

Community health checks and a community health status report were completed in February 2013.

 

The Qld Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing has funded PCYC to deliver a sport andrecreational service in Mossman Gorge. A local reference group has been formed which is working closely with PCYC to deliver a range of activities in the community including a school holiday programme that is well supported.

 

Safe Communities

The Mossman Gorge Wellbeing Centre is delivering integrated, community based and culturally appropriate social services for social/emotional wellbeing issues.

CYWR

Thirteen of the 30 homes in the community are registered dry houses. The Mossman Gorge alcohol ban referral model has been implemented in partnership with service providers Mossman Liquor Accord and the Elders Justice Network. The agreed music-off times is 10pm week nights and 12am weekends and is largely being respected.

LIP

At recent community consultations both services and residents noted improvements in community safety and noted Mossman Gorge has gone from noise and parties every night to a place of choice for families to live.

 

Economic participation

Mossman Gorge Tourism Centre (Gateway) opened in June 2012 and was officially opened by (former) Minister Macklin on 7 August 2012.

LIP, CYWR

The above Centre employs 66 people, with 90% of the workforce being Indigenous and comprising current and former residents of Mossman Gorge.

LIP, CYWR

Construction of the guided walking tracks and residential training facility at the Mossman Gorge Centre was completed in August 2012.

LIP

A 20 bed residential training facility operates in Mossman Gorge Centre and runs six month residential training programmes. Students who successfully complete the programme are being placed in employment within the Voyages Group, at the Mossman Gorge Gateway or other local businesses.

CYWR

BBN Arts has an agreement with the Gateway to supply up to 100% of (suitable quality) merchandise to the gallery. BBN has developed an innovative range of modestly priced artefacts made from sustainably harvested forest products and there are nine artists working to improve supply (ensure that BBN Arts Enterprise remains viable and increases production and sales).

IRSD SA

Governance & Leadership

BBN signed the Mossman Gorge Accord in March 2013. The accord sets out the aspirations of the community and relevant government commitments.

LIP

A five year business plan has been developed by BBN.

 

As part of the independent evaluation of the CYWR, community surveys were conducted to gauge the effectiveness of governance and leadership in Mossman Gorge. Of the 50 adults surveyed, 78% agreed that there was strong leadership in the community; and 68% agreed that people in Mossman Gorge today show more respect towards Elders and leaders than they did three years ago.

 

 

Doomadgee

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Forty two new houses and 106 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

NPARIH funded $2.025 million for the development of a 10 lot subdivision.

NPARIH

Six community members successfully completed a Certificate II in Repairs and Maintenance of Housing.

 

Environmental health and infrastructure upgrades have been completed to landfill and various roads.

LIP

The Pride in My Home initiative was committed and commenced delivering home living skills in November 2012.

LIP, IRSD SA

An Animal Management programme has been introduced.

 

The Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council has developed a town and land use planning scheme compliant with all Queensland legislation.

LIP

Doomadgee Technical Working Group meets to address any impediments to delivering housing under NPARIH, the maintenance and upgrade programme, as well as identifying any local employment and training opportunities, and the programming of other construction works.

LIP

Schooling

 

New resource centre has been built at the state school and a range of other capital infrastructure projects have been delivered including a new covered outdoor learning centre and the refurbishment of existing buildings.

LIP

Specially designed (‘XO’) laptops for children living in remote environments were provided to students to build computer confidence.

LIP, NPA DER

A School Guidance Counsellor, Special Needs teacher, Numeracy Coach and Learning Support Officer were engaged through the Low–Socio Economic Status School Communities NPA (LSSSC NPA).

LIP, LSSSC NPA

Six community members participated in the Remote Area Teacher Education programme.

LIP

Doomadgee State School employed a Guidance Officer to ensure that Student Future Folios were in place for students. The school is also supporting students to take part in an exchange programme in collaboration with Griffith University and Waanyi Nation Aboriginal Corporation, allowing students to be introduced to living, educational experiences and career opportunities not locally available.

LIP

The Parents Supporting Learning initiative supports families in understanding truancy and re-engaging young people with school. Two local School Attendance Case Managers were engaged.

LIP

Child health checks of 137 children aged 6 to 14 were undertaken in April 2013. The checks included ear health, dental health, skin health, emotional and social wellbeing/mental health, and blood checks. Annual checks are proposed for the first term.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program, Doomadgee State School is a partner in the NorthWest Qld Mining and Engineering Trade Training Centre in Mt Isa, delivering a range of qualifications in Engineering.

LIP, TTC

Early Childhood

 

Children and Family Centre completed in July 2012 and commenced operations. Staff housing was also constructed and completed in April 2013. It was officially opened in May 2013.

LIP, IECD NPA

The IPSS and Supported Playgroups have been delivered since 2011–12, for four days per week in different locations throughout the community to make them accessible to all families. They have also been working closely with Warrgoolbuginda Childcare

LIP

A new Outreach Midwife Service supported by an Indigenous Health worker commenced in 2011, delivering antenatal and postnatal services.

LIP, IECD NPA

Critical infrastructure upgrade of Warrgoolbuginda Childcare Centre in early 2012.

LIP

Pre-prep and prep has been introduced to the state school.

LIP

Kinder gym programme operational at the Police Community Youth Club (PCYC).

LIP

Anti-bullying and positive respect programmes operating

LIP

Four Warrgoolbuginda Childcare Centre staff are completing Certificate III Early Childhood. Save the Children have provided training and development opportunities to all of the early childhood team ranging from Certificate III to Diploma levels.

LIP

Visiting and local service providers and community are working to improve community sexual health awareness and education through Young Person’s Health Checks. Seventy one per cent of young people aged 15 to 24 were screened for a range of health issues early in 2012–13 with 48.6% attending a follow up screening in March 2013.

LIP, IECD NPA

Health

 

Wellbeing Services established to deliver better coordination and increased health services in Doomadgee including grief and loss support, suicide prevention interventions and health promotion activities.

LIP

A new Residential Rehabilitation Centre for the Lower Gulf will soon commence construction and is expected to be operational by early 2014.

LIP

Health service providers have been improving access to health checks and follow up services.

LIP

Four new wheelchairs were provided to the Ngooderi Aged Care facility as well as new outdoor furniture and safetyupgrades.

LIP

Uncle Jimmy Thumbs Up healthy tucker programme commenced in August 2011.

LIP

The Royal Flying Doctor Service delivered 122 child health checks (0-5 years), 137 school-aged child health checks (6-14 years) and up to date immunisations for 103 children (87% of the 0 to 6 years age group) over Jan–June 2013. Qld Health employed a project officer to develop culturally appropriate practitioner and client resources to address cultural issues of non-attendance.

LIP

The Doomadgee Wellbeing Service programmes and services include Personal Helpers and Mentors, and Family Mental Health Support Service, mental health and wellbeing education and awareness activities, and a local model of care coordination and case management.

LIP

From January to June 2013 the Doomadgee Community Safety Reference Group (CSRG) and local service providers, worked to develop strategies to tackle home brew and drug use and their impact on the health and wellbeing of children in the community. The Doomadgee Breaking the Cycle Plan promotes healthy lifestyles and education on alcohol abuse, tobacco, other drugs and volatile substance misuse.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

The Buckle up Bubba road safety programme operational since March 2011.

 

Major redevelopment of Sports, Arts and Recreation Precinct completed in 2011; activities commenced August 2011.

LIP

Local participatory research work on community safety has driven development of the Doomadgee Community Safety Action Plan (CSAP).

LIP, IRSD SA

Funding provided for repair of non-operational street lights and additional street lights in high priority areas.

LIP, IRSD SA

Low aromatic fuel storage facility established in 2011 to reduce petrol sniffing and improve community safety.

LIP

Ending Offending and Ending Family Violence programmes are being delivered regularly to offenders on both probation and parole in Doomadgee. The programmes focus on the use of alcohol and assisting violent offenders to identify and manage high risk situations and warning signs. A permanent Probation and Parole officer is now basedinDoomadgee.

LIP

Queensland Police Service employed a permanent Sergeant as Branch Manager for the Doomadgee Police Community Youth Club (PCYC) and a local Police Liaison Officer (PLO), recruitment is underway for a second PLO and is expected to be finalised in early 2013–14. The PLOs share their time between the PCYC and with the Doomadgee Police, strengthening the relationships between community and police.

LIP

Economic participation

 

Two locally owned small businesses successfully established (concrete and car hire).

LIP

Financial Wellbeing programme commenced early 2012.

LIP

CDEP have engaged Mentors and an Adult Literacy and Numeracy teacher.

LIP

Titans youth achievement programme completed with 34 participants having taken part and 30 of these participants now engaged in training or employment and undertaking the Duke of Edinburgh programme.

 

A fully operational Workers Accommodation Camp managed by the Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council has been established in Doomadgee. It has proved valuable during the construction of new community housing, and water infrastructure upgrades, and encouraged contractors to engage local people in these works.

LIP

Isa Skills - Doomadgee CDEP held a Community Careers Day to provide information on career and education pathways available to people in Doomadgee, with a particular focus on opportunities for youth. Stalls promoting local role models included Ambulance Drivers, Rangers, Health Workers, Miners, and Sport and Recreation Officers.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

Community education campaign about role of Council/running for office held before March 2012 local governmentelections.

LIP

Regional women’s forum held in August 2011 and local women’s leadership development forum held in September2012.

LIP

Youth week held November 2011 and Youth Leadership Forum held in November 2012.

 

The Doomadgee Community Radio Station increased their capability to deliver local community education messages. Staff received broadcasting training and ongoing support from Qld Remote Aboriginal Media (QRAM).

LIP

The Deadly Girls personal development and leadership programme for young women aged 18 to 25 was held in November 2012 and in June 2013. The Doomadgee Men’s Group, the Wellbeing Service and the RFDS Strong Fathers, Strong Families programmes have been providing opportunities for personal and leadership development formen.

LIP

 

Mornington Island

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixteen new houses and 76 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Under NPARIH $2.1 million is being invested for the development of sub-divisions to support future housing construction - 10 lots will be developed.

NPAR.IH

New fencing provided to all houses - completed early 2012.

LIP

Environmental health and infrastructure upgrades to landfill, water reticulation systems and various roads havebeenundertaken.

LIP

Commencement of the ‘Pride in My Home Program’ by June 2013. ‘Pride in My Home’ will work with the Tenancy Management Team and will allow households to access home living skills education and practical assistance to maintain a healthy and safe living environment for their families.

LIP, IRSD SA

An Animal Management programme has been introduced.

 

The Mornington Shire Council has set in place a town and land use planning scheme compliant with all Queenslandlegislation.

LIP

The Mornington Shire Council has an opportunity to construct 20 new houses to be delivered in 2013–14 under NPARIH. Council and the Australian Government have supported the establishment of a local company - the Mornington Island Aboriginal Corporation for Social and Economic Development (MIACSED) to assist with this work.

LIP

Schooling

 

A new Resource Centre has been built at the Mornington Island State School.

LIP

Specially designed (‘XO’) laptops for children living in remote environments were provided to students to build computer confidence.

LIP, NPA DER

A School Guidance Counsellor and Special Needs Teacher have been engaged through the Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities NPA.

LSSSC NPA

An Innovative Learning Centre was constructed and completed in December 2012, to provide an alternative space for school-aged parents to return to education and learning.

LIP, IRSD SA

Mornington Island State School received a new Resource Centre providing the community with a new library facility, computers and public internet access.

LIP

The Mt Isa ROC and Mornington Island State School held the first annual Mornington Island Careers Day in September 2012 followed by a week of work experience for all high school aged students. Planning is underway for the 2013 Careers Day and work experience programme.

LIP

The Innovative Learning Centre infrastructure was completed and fitted out in January 2013. The Centre is being utilised as the hub for the Parents Supporting Learning initiative and is aimed at re-engagement of students intoschool.

LIP

The Parents Supporting Learning initiative supports families in understanding truancy and re-engaging young people with school. Two local School Attendance Case Managers have been engaged.

LIP IRSD SA

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Mornington Island State School is a partner in the NorthWest Qld Mining and Engineering Trade Training Centre in Mt Isa, delivering a range of qualifications inEngineering.

LIP, TTC

Early Childhood

 

The Children and Family Centre (CFC) is complete and services are being delivered from the Centre. The 39 place long day care facility commenced operations in May 2013. Staff housing will be constructed.

LIP, IECD NP

Indigenous Parenting Support Service (IPSS) and Intensive Supported Playgroups have been delivered since early 2011. Playgroups are delivered four days per week in different locations throughout community to increase accessibility to all families.

LIP

New Outreach Midwife Service supported by an Indigenous Health worker commenced in 2011 delivering antenatal and postnatal services.

LIP, IECD NPA

Pre-prep commenced at the state school in 2011 providing early education for children from three and a half.

LIP

Mornington Island Community Health Centre and Mornington Island Hospital provided comprehensive child health and development checks and follow ups for all students of the Mornington Island State School in 2012 and have commenced the rolling programme again for 2013.

LIP

Certificates II to IV in Early Childhood training has been delivered to local people on Mornington Island in the lead up to the commencement of Communities for Children (CFC) and childcare operations in January 2013.

LIP

Health

 

Wellbeing Services were established to deliver integrated, community based and culturally appropriate social services and provide: counselling; and locally developed support programmes addressing drug, alcohol and related domestic violence, gambling and social/emotional wellbeing issues.

LIP

Tenders for construction of a Residential Rehabilitation Centre for the Lower Gulf (Normanton) closed on 19 February 2013, and construction has commenced, as has construction of staff accommodation.

LIP

Upgrades to the Kuba Natha Aged Care facility.

 

The RFDS has been delivering child and maternal health and positive family programmes. Eighty three child health checks (0 to 5 years) were undertaken and 90 children (0 to 6 years) (representing 97% of children in this age group) received up to date immunisations over January/June 2013. Qld Health employed a project officer to develop culturally appropriate practitioner and client resources to address cultural issues of non-attendance.

LIP

The Mornington Island Wellbeing Centre is operational. Services offered include the Personal Helpers and Mentors, and Family Mental Health Support Service, as well as community education and awareness activities to improve understanding of mental health and wellbeing. The Wellbeing Service has developed a local model of care coordination and case management.

LIP

Over January/June 2013 the Mornington Island Community Safety Reference Group and local service providers have been working to develop strategies to tackle home brew and drug use, and their impact on health and wellbeing of children in the community. Activities to promote healthy lifestyles and educate children and young people have been delivered. Further initiatives are being captured in the Mornington Island Breaking the Cycle Plan.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Local participatory research work on community safety has driven development of the Mornington Island Community Safety Action Plan (CSAP).

LIP, IRSD SA

The men’s space was upgraded in 2012.

LIP

A range of community safety and diversionary programmes and initiatives were funded, including repairs of non-operational and additional street lights; street signage and house numbering to enable emergency services to identify houses at night.

LIP IRSD SA

The Mornington Island Women’s Shelter recommenced operations in January 2012 after having some minor refurbishments done.

LIP

New Police accommodation was completed in July 2012.

LIP

A low aromatic fuel storage facility established in 2011 to reduce petrol sniffing and improve safety.

LIP

A Children’s Safe House commenced operations in June 2012 to support reunification of children in care withtheirfamilies.

LIP

Mirndiyan Gununa has turned space at the Arts Centre into a Young Adults Activity Centre. This Centre will also be the first stage of a larger project for 2013–14 that will see a new multi-media centre and consulting rooms added to the Young Adults Activity Centre.

LIP

The Mornington Shire Council and CDEP have been working with the community throughout 2012–13 to implement a number of projects including the construction of local rodeo grounds and the foreshore development.

LIP

Economic participation

 

Feasibility study conducted to establish a Gulf Indigenous supplier network with an immediate focus on an Indigenous construction entity.

LIP

New local training facilities in Mornington Island close to being finalised to provide training in hospitality, engineering (small engines/welding), computers and carpentry.

LIP

A Financial Wellbeing programme commenced in early 2012.

LIP

CDEP has engaged mentors, an Adult Literacy & Numeracy Teacher, and a Training and Employment Coordinator.

LIP

Titans youth achievement programme completed with well over 40 participants having taken part.

 

Fifteen (15) new jobs created with Council and Mirndiyan Art and Language through the NationalJobsConversionProgram.

 

The Mornington Island motel has been completed and provides eight cabin-style units for visitors and a Manager’sresidence.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

The ‘Leadership through Adventure’ programme being run by the PCYC includes activities such as sea kayaking and cultural business.

LIP

Training for Council and staff on the Local Government Act 2009.

LIP

A Youth week was held November 2011 and a Youth Leadership Forum was held in November 2012.

 

Development of local community governance structures including the Health Council, Men’s Group, Service Provider Network and the Training and Employment Network.

 

Leadership programmes for elders, adults and young women have been delivered in 2012–13 including a Women’s Leadership Program, adapted from the FaHCSIA National Indigenous Leadership Program, and the Deadly Girls programme for young women aged 18 to 25. The Mornington Island Men’s Group, the Wellbeing Service and the RFDS Strong Fathers, Strong Families programmes provided opportunities for personal and leadership development for men in the community.

LIP

The Mornington Island local cultural awareness programme, developed and delivered by Mirndiyan Gununa Aboriginal Corporation is now delivered to the majority of new arrivals to the community.

LIP

I.3 Western Australia - key achievements

Bardi Jawi

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Thirty seven new houses and 51 refurbishments completed to 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

Housing Management Agreements in place in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin and under discussion in Lombadina.

LIP

Tenancy support programmes to provide assistance to tenants in the care of their homes.

NPARIH

A 12 lot housing sub-division including site works constructed in Djarindjin by the Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Program (AACAP).

 

New four bedroom community house built in Djarindjin by AACAP.

 

Draft Environmental Health Plan completed.

LIP, IRSD SA

Schooling

 

School attendance officers working in Ardyaloon and in Djarindjin/Lombadina.

LIP

Sport and recreation weekend and holiday programmes led by a range of agencies to provide diversionary activities for children.

LIP

Further training and education provided to Aboriginal staff employed in Bardi Jawi schools.

LIP

Small classroom renovated with Audio Visual equipment at One Arm Point Remote Community School to support young students with special learning needs.

 

Major renovations to secondary education areas at Christ the King School.

 

Edible Gardens Program delivered in Bardi Jawi schools.

LIP

Cover for school basketball courts built at Bardi Jawi schools.

LIP

School psychologist and social worker to support staff in case management of student behavioural and learningissues.

LIP

Teachers available every end of term to discuss student attendance and learning issues raised by families and community residents.

LIP

Existing Christ the King School Community Partnership Agreement being reviewed to encourage community participation in school attendance, literacy and other schooling outcomes.

LIP

School Community Partnership Agreement completed at One Arm Point Remote Community School.

LIP

One Arm Point Remote Community School holds 2-day culture camps annually involving elders and other communityresidents.

LIP

Stronger Smarter Schools Training commenced at One Arm Point Remote Community School.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for trade training facilities was approved for Christ the King School and One Arm Point Remote Community School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are construction, horticulture and hospitality.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Djarindjin Early Child Care Centre refurbished and renovated including a new safer kitchen and office for the Manager to provide a safer and larger area for activities.

LIP

Delivery of Indigenous Parenting Support Services (IPSS) in Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP

Locational Supported Playgroup funded in Ardyaloon and facilities refurbished.

LIP

Bardi Jawi Family and Early Learning Centre completed.

LIP

Annual Early Childhood Expo held in Bardi Jawi communities for children, families and service providers.

LIP

Community residents studying Early Childhood qualifications to prepare them to work in the new Family and EarlyLearning Centre.

 

Health

 

Suicide Prevention Community Action Plans developed and implemented in Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP, IRSD SA

Commercial grade kitchen built in Ardyaloon community hall.

LIP

Toilets and change rooms renovated at Ardyaloon Community Hall to support community activities and sports events.

LIP

Social and Emotional Wellbeing (SEWB) officer operates in Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP

Dental, environmental and veterinary services provided by the AACAP.

 

Wellbeing support and counselling provided regularly in each community for adults on self-referral and clinic‑referralbasis.

 

Suicide prevention and post-vention services provided to Bardi Jawi communities.

 

Fortnightly visits to Bardi Jawi communities by Alcohol and Drug Outreach workers for counselling and education.

 

Full time Maternal and Child Health Midwife operating in communities.

 

Reroofing of Djarindjin store to prevent food spoilage.

LIP

Kimberley Mobile Dental Clinic service provided.

 

Regional Ear Health and Eye Care programmes provided.

LIP

Mapping of health services completed.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Bardi Jawi Community Safety Expo held by service providers for community residents.

LIP

Alcohol and drug use community and service provider workshop held as the basis of the development of community Alcohol and Drug Management Plans.

 

Dampier Peninsula Sport and Recreation Plan completed.

LIP

Ardyaloon Oval rebuilt to facilitate sports and other recreational activities for community residents.

LIP

Environmental health equipment provided to Djarindjin community in order to manage dust, water run-off andhighgrasses.

LIP, IRSD SA

Good fire/bad fire education programme delivered annually to Bardi Jawi schools.

LIP

Youth Drop In Centre established in Djarindjin and part time co-ordinator employed.

LIP

Kimberley Aged and Community Services Outreach Workers in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin.

LIP

Ardyaloon Basketball Association incorporated to organise basketball games and tournaments.

 

Draft Emergency Management Plans developed.

LIP

Construction of a storm water diversion system and safety improvements at the intersection of Djarindjin and Lombadina by the AACAP.

 

Ardyaloon community basketball courts resurfaced and new hoops and fencing installed by AACAP.

 

Djarindjin community basketball court repainted, new hoops installed and bleachers built.

 

Communication about anti-social behaviour (including noisy party control) implemented.

LIP

Youth at Risk meetings between WA Police, WA Department for Child Protection, Juvenile Justice and the school heldfortnightly.

LIP

Social Governance project funded for Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation and Ardyaloon Incorporated to support community driven community safety strategies.

LIP

Remote licencing services provided regularly to Bardi Jawi communities.

 

Economic participation

 

Money Management Program operating in Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP

‘In Roads’ Program operating to assist with small loans and advice on business start-ups.

 

New training facilities built at Djardindjin.

LIP

Building refurbished in Ardyaloon as a training facility.

LIP

Employment services including training and mentoring in Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP

A Training and Employment Expo provided by service providers was held for the community.

LIP

Peninsula Transport Strategy feasibility study completed.

LIP

Bardi Jawi Rangers and Oorany Rangers programmes delivered.

 

AACAP delivered several short training courses with high attendance and completion rates.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

Bardi Jawi Governance Project to connect the governance of the community corporations and the Bardi Jaw NativeTitle Prescribed Body Corporate funded and Stage 1 completed; funding obtained for Stage 2 implementationofagreements.

LIP, IRSD SA

Service Briefing held every two to three months in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin/Lombadina to connect residents using services with service providers.

LIP

Ardyaloon Women’s Centre relocated and a dedicated building upgraded with funding from Lottery West to facilitate Women’s art and cultural activities.

LIP

Services Research Project mapped all services to Bardi Jawi communities.

LIP

Compulsory cultural awareness training for all resident and visiting service providers in Ardyaloon.

LIP

Upgrade to Djarindjin community hall for community meetings.

 

Cultural governance project funded in Bardi Jawi communities.

IRSD SA

Service provider accommodation constructed in Ardyaloon by AACAP.

 

Capacity building for community corporation directors through the Social Governance Project.

LIP

 

Beagle Bay

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Fifteen new houses and 67 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Housing Management Agreements in place.

LIP

Local Housing Officer employed to manage day-to-day housing business in the community.

LIP

Local Housing Committee established.

LIP

Community Layout Plan reviewed and land identified for construction of houses.

LIP

Schooling

 

Vocational training and pathways from school to work available in community.

LIP

School Attendance Officer has resulted in increase in student attendance.

LIP

A ‘water only’ strategy adopted by Sacred Heart School in 2012 to encourage healthy eating habits.

 

School holiday programme delivered for young people.

LIP, IRSD SA

Improvements to literacy and numeracy through a variety of initiatives including appointment of a Literacy Coordinator at Sacred Heart School.

LIP

A school lunch programme is provided to children that do not have any lunch.

LIP

Regular health checks, emotional wellbeing and pastoral support programmes are delivered at Sacred Heart School.

LIP

Suicide prevention response developed by Sacred Heart School to assist students.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for a trade training facility was approved for Sacred Heart School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are construction, horticulture andhospitality.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Indigenous Parenting Support Services (IPSS) and Locational supported playgroups in place.

LIP,

Parents as Learners Program in place to encourage parents to read to their children.

LIP

Women’s Centre building refurbished to incorporate playgroup activities. Refurbishment included children’s toilets, change room and air-conditioning.

LIP

Community Early Childhood Reference Group established.

LIP

Inclusion of cultural activities such as singing of songs in local Nyul Nyul language in playgroup activities.

LIP

Local school liaison officer appointed to engage parents, address truancy and link community and school together.

LIP

Mapping exercise undertaken of the number of 0 to 3 year olds in the community to identify servicing needs and to encourage attendance in the playgroup.

LIP

Health

 

New ambulance provided.

LIP

A ‘Be Active’ Officer employed to provide sport and recreation activities during and after school hours.

LIP

Community Health Reference Group established.

 

Dental exams and treatments provided by the AACAP.

 

Draft Environmental Health Plan completed.

IRSD SA

Full time Maternal and Child Health Nurse operating in communities.

 

Funding approved for extensions (extra consulting rooms) to the Beagle Bay Health Clinic.

 

Men’s Group established and Beagle Bay Clinic coordinating men’s health services.

 

Part time Family Support Worker employed in community.

 

Suicide Prevention Community Action Plan developed.

LIP

Beagle Bay Alcohol and Drug Management Plan developed and endorsed by the community.

LIP

Community survey on the perception of alcohol completed to help inform the development of local alcohol related harm prevention strategies.

LIP

Upgrades to the standard and safety of community water supply tanks.

 

Safe Communities

 

Drug and Alcohol Curriculum included at Sacred Heart School.

LIP

Curfews implemented by community members to ensure children are safe and get a good night’s sleep.

 

Dampier Peninsula Sport and Recreation Plan completed.

LIP

A Community Safety Reference Group was established.

LIP

A Community Safety survey was completed to inform the local Community Safety Plan.

LIP

Economic participation

 

Workshop held to map jobs, employment and business opportunities in the community.

LIP

Jobs, Training and Business Community Reference Group established.

LIP

AACAP delivered several short training courses with high attendance and completion rates.

LIP

Business plan developed for establishment of a market garden.

LIP

Mentoring and capacity building for Ngarlan store directors and staff.

 

Working on Country mentoring support for rangers.

 

School traineeship positions offered to the community.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

Governance and Leadership Community Reference Group established.

LIP,
NPA RSD

Two young people attended FaHCSIA’s Youth Leadership Program.

LIP

Establishment of new corporation to manage the operations of the Beagle Bay store.

IRSD SA

Youth Reference Group established.

 

Community survey on preferred community governance model completed.

 

Mentoring and capacity support provided to Beagle Bay Women’s Group Committee.

 

Land, Language & Culture

 

Review of Beagle Bay Community Layout Plan completed and endorsed by the community.

 

Community Land, Language and Culture Working Group established.

 

Strategy developed for recording and broadcasting of traditional and contemporary stories on local radio and the recording of Nyul Nyul language.

 

Options identified to establish a larger base/office for the Nyul Nyul Rangers.

 

 

Fitzroy Valley

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixty one new houses and 77 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Four houses built in Joy Springs and sewerage system upgraded by the AACAP.

 

Housing Reference Group established and merged into Fitzroy Valley Housing and Infrastructure Sub-Committee.

LIP

Draft Environmental Health Plan completed.

LIP, IRSD SA

Workshops on improved housing management and tenant responsibility held with WA Department of Housing and Marra Worra Worra.

LIP

Schooling

 

Secondary students attended the Broome career expo.

 

Year 10 students attended a leadership programme in Perth.

 

Youth Coordination project underway.

LIP, IRSD SA

Student Services Manager and Youth Support Worker employed at the High School.

 

New Fitzroy Valley District High School.

 

Focus on school re-engagement programmes through ‘Sporting Change’ and Clontarf Football Academy Program.

 

Indigenous Ranger Cadetship Pilot Program at Fitzroy Valley District High School.

 

Youth Reference Group established and merged into Fitzroy Valley Youth and Recreation Sub-Committee.

LIP

Fitzroy Valley Futures Education, Employment and Training Sub-Committee established.

LIP

Early Childhood

 

Indigenous Parenting Support Services (IPSS) and Locational Supported Playgroups delivered.

LIP

Children and Families Centre (Baya Gawiy Buga yani Jandu yani u) built and operational. Officiallyopened2July2013.

LIP,
IECD NPA

Three childcare traineeships funded.

 

Community awareness programme funded to raise awareness of the effects of Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FaSD) on pregnant mothers.

LIP

Parents and Learning Program delivered.

 

Liliwan FaSD Prevalence Study completed. Information sessions on the study and FaSD have been delivered to the community, agencies and organisations.

LIP

Long Day Care service and Mobile playgroups delivered.

 

Health

 

Two beds in hospital ward converted for dialysis treatment.

LIP

Collaborative approach developed between WA Government agency and service providers to address futurerenalneeds.

LIP

Two Mental Health positions funded.

LIP

Fitzroy Valley Alcohol and Other Drug Management Group established.

LIP

Trachoma community health checks delivered.

 

Funding for the Fitzroy Valley Alcohol Restrictions - Community Narrative to capture stories about changes experienced due to alcohol restrictions.

IRSD SA

Dental exam treatments completed by AACAP).

 

Nindilingarri Cultural Health Services delivered workshops on Women’s Health Business, Growing Strong Babies and Keeping Our Kids Strong.

 

Mental Health Respite: Carer Support programme delivered.

 

Men’s Shed (Gurama yani u) established and incorporated. Hosts family nights and men’s health clinics.

LIP

Patient Assisted Transport Scheme - applied for Fitzroy Valley communities.

LIP

Fitzroy Valley Futures Health and Well-Being Sub-Committee established.

LIP

The Smarter than Smoking Bandaral Ngarri Festival held.

 

Safe Communities

 

New police station completed.

LIP

Establishment of Youth reference group. Merged into the Fitzroy Valley Futures Youth and RecreationSub‑Committee.

 

Yiriman Youth Diversionary strategy developed by elders for young people.

LIP

Marninwarntikura (Fitzroy Women’s Resource and Legal Centre) supported for future operational needs.

IRSD SA

Fitzroy Valley family week activities undertaken.

 

Department of Corrective Services established a juvenile justice team.

 

Department for Child Protection office established in Fitzroy Crossing.

 

Workshops on ‘Know Your Legal Rights and Stand Strong’ delivered.

 

Hey Dad workshops delivered at the Fitzroy Valley Men’s Shed.

 

Suicide Prevention Community Action Plan underway.

LIP, IRSD SA

Youth Mental Health First Aid Training delivered.

 

Safe4Kids Workshops (Protective Behaviours) delivered to the community.

 

Lifeline Domestic Violence Alert two day workshop delivered to the community.

 

The Fitzroy Valley Futures Justice and Community Safety Sub-Committee established.

LIP

Economic participation

 

Public Transport Feasibility Study completed.

LIP

The Fitzroy Valley Education, Employment, Training Sub-Committee established.

LIP

Kimberley Training Institute campus established.

LIP

The Fitzroy Valley Economic Development Sub-Committee established.

LIP

Driver training programmes conducted to provide work ready skills.

 

Driver licence identification open days conducted.

 

Fitzroy Valley Employment Related Accommodation built and operational.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

Men’s Shed incorporated in August 2012.

 

Governance training provided to the Fitzroy Valley Futures Forum.

LIP

ORIC conducted training for registered organisations and directors.

 

AACAP delivered a wide range of short training courses which have had high attendance and completion rates.

 

Six male delegates funded to attend Men’s Shed Conference in Cairns.

 

Women’s Bush Meeting funded.

LIP, IRSD SA

Augmentation of Fitzroy Valley Futures Sub-Committee system which covers Closing the Gap Building Blocks. Expansion of the Fitzroy Valley Futures Governing Committee (three new community representatives and three new language group representatives from the Prescribed Body Corporates).

LIP

Continuation of a stable governance model through the Fitzroy Valley Futures Forum, with forums conducted quarterly since 2007.

 

Land, Language & Culture

 

Use of interpreters at government meetings.

NPA RSD

Support provided for the Ranger Program.

 

Cultural Governance project underway.

 

Archive officer funded by Kimberley Language Resource Centre to support the management of the current and futurelanguage archives.

 

Bunuba Native Title Determination.

 

Gooniyandi Native Title Determination.

 

 

Halls Creek

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Twenty eight new houses and 48 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Royalties for Regions funding received for the construction of houses as part of the NGO housing project.

LIP

Home ownership summit held to promote local home ownership.

 

Draft Environmental Health Plan developed.

LIP

Schooling

 

A School Community Partnership Agreement established.

 

Literacy Coordinator appointed at Halls Creek District High School.

 

A dedicated School Based Attendance Officer engaged to lift school attendance rates.

LIP

Increased staffing ratios to include one Indigenous staff member per classroom.

 

Implementation of various innovative programmes to increase parental engagement with Halls Creek District High School (e.g. school passport programme, school open days, and parental assembly).

 

Ongoing programmes to bolster engagement with Indigenous students; Stronger Smarter training for teachers, campsfor students.

LIP

Consultations held relating to the opportunity for a Trade Training Centre at Halls Creek District High School.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TCC), funding for a trade training facility was approved for Halls Creek District High School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are construction andhorticulture.

TTC

$10 million Infrastructure upgrade for Halls Creek District High School implemented by WA Department of Education.

LIP

‘Girls from Oz’ and Clontarf sports academy operating at Halls Creek District High School.

 

Early Childhood

 

Locational Playgroup operating in several Halls Creek town based communities.

LIP

Halls Creek Children and Family Centre completed. Centre opened on 2 July 2013 by key stakeholders and HallsCreek resident/WA local member for Kimberley.

LIP,
IECD NPA

Community input into the design and development of all programmes operating from the Children and Family Centre.

LIP

Early Years Network established and providing collaborative support for training early year workers in childcare etc.

LIP

Community based childcare centre registered as a formal Childcare Benefit provider.

 

Indigenous Parenting Support Service delivered and offering a community cooking programme.

 

Health

 

New 4WD ambulance funded for emergency transport.

LIP

Mapping of all current health services and programmes completed.

LIP

Increased delivery of staff housing for WA Health staff in Halls Creek through links with WA Housing programme.

 

Halls Creek Healing Strategy developed.

LIP

Halls Creek Healing Taskforce established by leaders in the Halls Creek community to direct outcomes from the healing strategy.

LIP

Personal Helpers and Mentors Program implemented as part of the Halls Creek Healing Strategy.

 

Clinical information sharing system implemented across all health services.

 

Scoping project into capital infrastructure upgrades of clinical and staffing needs completed.

 

Volatile substance use protocols adopted and applied where required.

LIP

Dental exam treatments completed by AACAP.

 

Two additional beds provided to the Halls Creek Frail Aged Service for respite support.

LIP

Tackling Smoking programme delivered.

LIP

Social and Emotional Wellbeing Trainer employed to support service delivery agencies in Halls Creek.

 

Child Health Plan completed.

 

Safe Communities

 

Security screens installed in new housing and being progressively installed in existing public housing.

LIP

Draft Environmental Health Plan completed.

IRSD SA

Suicide Community Action Plan completed, endorsed by community and implemented.

IRSD SA

Mowan Marnu Men’s Group established and funded for basic equipment. This group meets weekly to support men to make their community safer.

LIP

Annual Fun Run, dubbed ‘Human Race’ held to celebrate reconciliation of the whole Halls Creek community and promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

Youth Services Coordinator engaged to build collaborative and sustainable practice among youth services in the EastKimberley.

IRSD SA

Youth Drop-In Centre established in Halls Creek to provide support for youth at risk.

 

Economic participation

 

Burraluba Ngurra Employment Related Accommodation built to provide transitional accommodation for Indigenous workers and students to reduce barriers related to retention.

LIP

Ongoing audit of available employment and training opportunities in Halls Creek.

LIP

Public Transport Feasibility Study completed and distributed to several key agencies to investigate possible implementation of a bus system in Halls Creek.

LIP

Successful completion of several Indigenous employment projects tailored to meet local needs including drivers licensing, mining and pastoral programmes.

LIP

‘Living Change’ Welfare Reform programme consultation completed and concept design underway.

LIP, IRSD SA

Several groups completed the Indigenous Business Australia delivered ‘Getting into Business’ workshops.

LIP

Several local people completed Interpreter training. This increases the number of available interpreters in the HallsCreek region.

 

Halls Creek Community Planning tool developed and used weekly as a key communication interface for events, activities and employment opportunities in Halls Creek.

LIP

Tailored vehicle licensing programme being implemented in Halls Creek to improve access to vehicle licensing intheregion.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

Halls Creek Aboriginal Affairs Committee established to provide a local Indigenous voice to the Shire of Halls Creek and build capacity of potential councillors.

LIP

Yarylil Arts Centre constructed to provide a dedicated building and exhibition space for local artists.

 

Establishment of a Youth Council being progressed through the Shire of Halls Creek.

LIP, IRSD SA

Governance and capacity building provided to Halls Creek Healing Taskforce to assist them in developing theirformalstructure.

LIP

Government, non-government, service providers and not for profit agencies meeting monthly to work collaboratively through information sharing on issues that affect the Halls Creek community.

 

Land, Language & Culture

 

Kimberley Language Resource Centre archive strategy implemented to update Kimberley cultural language library using modern media techniques.

LIP

Kimberley Language Resource Centre strategic plan completed to ensure sustainable language services totheKimberley.

LIP

Cultural awareness programmes delivered to provide the opportunity to all agencies and businesses to deliver more culturally appropriate services.

 

Elders’ Reference Group established to support and nurture cultural practices in the Kimberley region, including elders from Halls Creek and surrounds.

LIP

Halls Creek Land, Housing Heritage Advisory Board, continues to work collaboratively across the two key language groups on land tenure and housing issues.

 

I.4 South Australia - key achievements

Amata

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Thirty three new houses and 42 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

Community accepted new tenancy agreements in 2012.

LIP

Dog health programme operating and producing better health outcomes through the Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC).

LIP

The Home and Community Care (HACC) programme supports the elderly and people with a disability to liveindependently.

LIP

Six young men from Amata participated in a furniture making programme. As a result, many beds were constructed, and affordable mattresses, pillows and sheets will be made available to all local Anangu residents.

LIP, IRSDSA

The Amata internet Access Centre was established and opened in 2012 to give the community additional access to banking and internet services.

LIP

Schooling

 

Breakfast Program continues to operate successfully at Amata Community School.

LIP

Vocational Education Program underway with the secondary boys’ class (15 students) and traineeships are being held in the community and at the Yulara Resort overseen by the Indigenous Land Corporation.

LIP

Carclew Youth Arts working with senior members of the community, schools and students to pass on traditional stories and develop educational resources in Pitjantjatjara language through the Tjitji Tjuta Inmaku Pakantjaku project. This project aims to revitalise the teaching of Inma (cultural ceremonies) through the production of books andvisualproducts.

IRSD SA

Amata Youth Action Plan was completed in April 2012.

LIP

An Amata Youth Representative Forum has been formed.

LIP

The South Australian National Football League (SANFL) is delivering a youth multi sports programme allowing children to participate in football and softball competitions.

LIP

Students worked with teachers and the community to construct an entrance wall for their school.

IRSD SA

TAFE South Australia Regional (TAFE SA) has worked with the Amata School to deliver the Young Fellas programme to help engage male youth aged 15 to 24 years.

 

Amata School has entered into a VET in Schools Agreement (VISA) with TAFE SA. Under this arrangement a staff member with current and relevant VET qualifications is able to deliver a cluster of units from the CertificateinHospitality (Kitchen Operations).

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Amata Anangu School has received funding as a partner in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Trade Training Centre at Umuwa. The facility is delivering qualifications in agriculture, automotive, baking, construction, engineering, horticulture and hospitality.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Early Childhood Centre commenced operations in February 2012 and was officially opened in July 2012. Services delivered include a breakfast programme, Locational Supported Playgroup, Indigenous Parenting Support Services Program; and Occasional Care Program.

LIP

Communities for Children (CfC), Indigenous Parenting Services Program established in 2010.

 

Nganampa Health has a midwife based at the Amata clinic and local Anangu parents have access to antenatal programmes linked to the clinic.

LIP

Refurbishment of the Amata Family Wellbeing Centre was completed.

 

Health

 

Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia (DASSA) Substance Misuse Centre realigned as a Family Wellbeing Centre (FWC) in September 2011. Home and Community Care; Disability; Aged; Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CaMHS) and DASSA programmes are being delivered from the centre.

LIP

Personal Helpers and Mentors Program (Mental Health) delivered in Amata from 12 May 2009 to 30 June 2013.

 

Medical specialists visit community more frequently.

LIP

Renal dialysis patients can now receive treatment on the APY Lands through a mobile dialysis bus which commenced visiting the community from February 2012.

LIP

Amata Athletics Club was established.

 

A diabetes education and walking programme has been introduced.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

New police complex construction completed mid-2009 and operational in January 2010 (2009–10). Four permanent police officers are stationed in Amata.

LIP

Community Night Patrol training completed for 10 volunteers in July 2012.

LIP, IRSD SA

A HF Radio transceiver network has been established across the APY Lands under the Indigenous Communications Program Initiative which is vital for community safety as there is no mobile coverage in Amata.

LIP

DASSA are based in Amata and administer outreach services across the APY Lands.

 

The Cross Borders Family Violence Women’s Program targets female perpetrators of family violence through intensive activities addressing violent behaviour, anger management and substance abuse.

IRSD SA

Since 2012, families on the APY Lands have been able to volunteer for income management to assist them with budgeting in the best interests of their children.

 

Economic participation

 

TAFE SA currently supporting Amata youth to access training: Certificate I in Construction and CommunityServices‑Child Care.

LIP

Six Indigenous workers graduated with a Certificate 1 in Civil Construction in May 2011 and worked on completinghouses under NPARIH.

NPARIH

Anangu Work Expos run by TAFE SA in 2010, 2011 and June 2012 to provide education pathways from schooltoemployment.

IRSD SA

Six Anangu staff employed with Family Wellbeing Centre, Country Health SA.

 

An APY Economic Development Officer and an APY Cattle Manager are working with government to develop training and employment opportunities in the camel and cattle industry.

LIP

MoneyMob Talkabout is a financial literacy education service established in 2012. The service assists Anangu to make strong financial choices and provides one-on-one financial counselling and financial literacy education.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

Anangu women attended Indigenous women’s issues conferences in 2010 and 2011.

LIP

Anangu youth attended the 2010 and 2011 Blank Page Summit Hard Yarn Youth Mob conferences.

LIP, IRSD SA

‘Ngurintja’ Community Engagement Workshop in June 2011 involving the community, Australian and State Governments to discuss LIP implementation progress and community priorities (refresh of LIPs).

LIP

Community research project on bush medicine completed in August 2011 through the ParticipatoryActionResearchproject.

NPA RSD

NPY Women’s Council engaged to support Amata students to form a youth council and participate in communitygovernance and decision making.

LIP

Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) held in May 2013 and provided local service providers with Anangu‑delivered cultural awareness training.

LIP

 

Mimili

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Thirty one new houses and 26 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

HACC programme supports the elderly and people with a disability to live independently.

 

Schooling

 

The Tjitji Tjuta Inmaku Pakantjaku Project in partnership with Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Education Centre (PYEC), Department of Education and Community Development (DECD) and Carclew Youth Arts is working with elders and the students of Mimili School to pass on traditional stories and create educational resources in Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara - contributing to the preservation of language and culture.

IRSD SA

The secondary class and the Anangu Coordinator are delivering high quality Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara language programmes.

 

Eighteen students participated in Variety’s Youth Development Project (on the One & All tall ship) in November 2010.

LIP,
IRSD SA

Students worked with teachers and the community to construct an entrance wall for their school.

IRSD SA

The SANFL currently delivers a youth multi sports programme allowing students to participate in football and softballcompetitions.

LIP,
IRSD SA

An Internet Centre opened in 2012 where students and young adults can supplement their education with afterschoolinternet access.

LIP

Anangu work expos in 2011, 2012 and 2013 provided education pathways from school to employment.

IRSD SA

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Mimili Anangu School has received funding as a partner in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Trade Training Centre at Umuwa. The facility is delivering qualifications in agriculture, automotive, baking, construction, engineering, horticulture and hospitality.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Communities for Children (CfC) Indigenous Parenting Services Program established in 2010 to provide early intervention services to support families and children through transitions to childcare, preschool and primary school.

 

Nganampa Health has helped to maintain improvements in live birth weights which are a critical factor in early childhood development.

 

Locational Supported Playgroups run three days a week.

LIP

The Mimili Homemaker Centre delivers a programme providing meals to a small number of children.

LIP

Health

 

Community Clean Up day in March 2011 and December 2012.

LIP

Red Cross Good Start Breakfast Club commenced in January 2011.

 

The Mimili community bush garden was rejuvenated to provide the community with a source of fresh produce.

LIP

The YMCA delivered a water safety and survival programme for school students in 2012.

LIP, IRSD SA

Renal dialysis patients can now receive treatment on the APY Lands through the Mobile Dialysis Bus.

LIP

Regional Anangu Services Aboriginal Corporation has been engaged to improve landscaping in public areas, implement regular dust control measures and collect and manage garbage in the community.

LIP

The Personal Helpers and Mentors Program has been delivered since May 2009.

 

A Laundromat is currently being constructed.

LIP

A Family Wellbeing Centre is under construction.

 

Improved water quality through installation of a filtration plant.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

New police complex - construction completed mid-2009 and operational December 2009. Police officers increased to four full-time since 20 February 2010 (implementation of Mulligan Inquiry).

LIP

Mimili night patrol established in October 2012. [Implementation of Mulligan Inquiry Rec No. 36 + Community priority].

LIP, IRSD SA

HF radio transceiver network re-established across the APY Lands in 2012.

LIP

A Cross Border Family Violence Men’s Program was held in 2011, with the women’s programme held in 2010.

 

Additional accommodation has been constructed for police and child protection workers.

LIP

Economic participation

 

TAFE SA currently supporting Mimili youth with access to Cert I in Conservation and Land Management and Certificate 1 in Hospitality.

 

Fourteen (14) participants completed Certificate in Resources and Infrastructure and gained a StatementofAttainment in Certificate 2 Civil Construction.

LIP

MoneyMob Talkabout financial service established in 2012.

 

New arts centre and staff accommodation were funded and will be completed in 2014.

IRSD SA

APY Economic Development Officer and APY Cattle Manager are working with government to develop training and employment opportunities in the camel and cattle industry.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

NPY Women’s Council engaged to support Mimili students to form a youth council.

LIP

Anangu women attended Indigenous women’s issues conferences in 2010 and 2011.

LIP

Anangu youth attended the 2010 and 2011 Blank Page Summit Hard Yarn Youth Mob conferences.

IRSD SA

Community research project on family care for the elderly completed in August 2011.

NPA RSD

An APY Governance Support Officer was employed in 2011.

 

Mimili Tjukurpa Kunypu Wangkama community event held in November 2011 to set priorities for the coming year.

 

Other Key Achievements

 

Repair and restoration of the Mimili church was completed in April 2012.

LIP, IRSD SA

Mimili Internet Access Centre opened in 2012.

LIP

Solar heating installed at the Mimili pool in 2011.

LIP

I.5 Northern Territory - key achievements

Angurugu

LIP action

NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixty new houses and 35 refurbishments and rebuilds completed as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

Integrated Money Management Services have been implemented by the Red Cross.

LIP

Schooling

 

An Anindilyakwa Education and Training Board was established in December 2010 to consider and implement key outcomes from the 2009 Review of Education in the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island region.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The Ngakwurralangwa College was established in response to a review of education needs in the Anindilyakwa region and encompasses all schools on the Groote archipelago.

 

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme, Angurugu Community Education Centre received a multi-purpose hall, outdoor shade structure, ICT upgrade and a building refurbishment.

BER

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the NTGovernment’s EveryChildEveryDay Strategy.

NTG

The School Enrolment and Attendance Measure, as a component of the Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory (SFNT) commenced in all four schools of the Ngakwurralangwa College in early 2013.

SFNT

Outside school hours care to look after children while parents are at work.

 

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Angurugu School received funding as a partner in the Anindilyakwa Trade Training Centre to deliver qualifications in construction, hospitality and resources and infrastructure. The facility at the Angurugu School site was completed in August 2013. It has been built to cyclone shelter standards and will be the community cyclone shelter.

LIP, TTC

A Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) project supports parents and community in school governance and another PaCE project facilitates parents and community producing, recording and sharing cultural stories withtheirchildren.

 

Early Childhood

 

A Child and Family Leader has been contracted to support community level integration of early childhood and family support services tailored to the Angurugu community and its surrounding service delivery area.

LIP

The Families as First Teachers - Indigenous Parenting Support Services Program (FaFT‑IPSS) and playgroup service is operational, delivering early learning and parenting support strategies.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA,

Playgroup sessions continue to be delivered for 2 to 3 hours, on an average of five days per week during the school term. FaFT‑IPSS funding has been extended to 2014.

LIP

A Women’s Centre Coordinator was employed until June 2012, with a new appointment made in mid-2013 to coordinate programmes and activities being run from the centre and to involve Angurugu women in the operation ofthe centre.

LIP

The preschool programme is being delivered through the Angurugu School.

LIP

Health

 

Installation of the fluoridation and chlorination treatment plants and new water supply infrastructure at Angurugu was commissioned on 13 August 2013 and is complete.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

An aircraft wheelchair lift has been provided for Groote Eylandt airport and Vincent Aviation terminal in Darwin to assist people with Machado Joseph Disease (MJD) and other mobility impairments.

LIP

The Groote Eylandt Mining Company (GEMCO) provides accommodation for visiting health professionals andspecialists.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

$200,000 has been provided under the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island RPA to support key MJDfoundationprojects.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

In July 2012 the MJD Foundation conducted a women’s camp on Groote Eylandt.

IRSD SA
RSD NPA

Construction of staff accommodation at the Angurugu Aged and Disability Care Centre was completed in March 2013. The units provide accommodation for aged and disability care staff to provide 24-hour care to residents of the Mungkadinamanja Aged and Disability Care Centre, subject to staff recruitment and funding.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA, IRSD SA

IRSD SA funding has been approved to allow the Angurugu Aged Care and Disability Service to purchase three sets of palliative care equipment for in-home use across Groote Eylandt.

LIP, IRSD SA

Upgraded ambulance services have been provided by GEMCO including new ambulance vehicles and at least one paramedic per shift.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

A women’s safe house is operational and has been operating in the community since December 2010.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA, SFNT

One Remote Aboriginal Family Community Worker has been recruited and is working out of the Women's Safe Place.

CtG NT NPA

Installation of traffic calming measures, including speed bumps, safety signage and road safety awareness campaigns are run in the community.

LIP

A new office and facility for the Northern Territory Police was completed and was operational in February 2012.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

A Community Engagement Police Officer has been recruited and works across Groote Eylandt.

 

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in April 2012. As at December 2013, 154 people had gained a learner licence and 95 people had gained a provisional licence in Angurugu and Umbakumba.

NTG

Continued targeting of drug activity on and destined for Groote Eylandt, through the Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk and the development of a Substance Misuse Strategy.

LIP

A Community Safety Plan, with child protection and welfare, was developed and endorsed by the Local Reference Group in March 2013.

LIP

A community night patrol operates in Angurugu so people can feel safe in the community.

 

Education on dog management has been delivered.

LIP, IRSD SA

Economic Participation

 

A Threatened Species Research Centre has been built and has been operational since May 2012. The centre employs 15 local Indigenous people and operates as the base for the Anindilyakwa Land and Sea Rangers.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

$2.4 million has been committed under the Regional Partnership Agreement for mining trade training and mentoring.

Groote Eylandt RPA

NPARIH has generated local employment opportunities - as at 31 December 2012, a number of Angurugu people were employed to construct and maintain houses in the community.

NPARIH

Support for Anindilaykwa Rangers through the Working on Country (WCP) programme.

 

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

A Governance Development Plan was endorsed by the Anindilyakwa Land Council and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises Board in February 2011.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The Angurugu Local Reference Group (ALRG) was established and received governance training in August and October 2012 - the ALRG will continue to receive ongoing governance training.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

Youth, Sport and Recreation

 

The development of a youth strategy to coordinate existing services, identify gaps, and support leadership development opportunities for youth, was finalised in late 2011. Implementation of actions within the youth strategy is ongoing with oversight from the Youth Steering Committee.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

A vehicle was provided to the community to transport AFL players to inter-school football matches on Groote Eylandt.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The Youth Steering Committee and the new Youth Services Team Leader and Mentor are continuing to work together to implement the actions in the youth strategy.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

A One People One Voice Festival was held from 18-21 June 2012 and on 14 June 2013. The festival was a celebration of the youth strategy which also provided opportunities for elders and youth to share and celebrate Anindilyakwa culture.

 

Construction of AFL clubroom facilities was completed in January 2013, including new change rooms for the AFLprogramme.

LIP

Upgrades to Angurugu youth facilities, including the recreation hall and basketball court were completed in 2011.

LIP

Through the Groote Eylandt Basketball Project more than 200 women and girls participated in a programme encouraging their involvement in all aspects of competitive basketball including coaching, umpiring and organising a basketball carnival.

LIP

Delivery of the AFL Remote Regional Development Program in Angurugu continues, with support from local organisations including GEMCO and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises (GEBIE).

LIP

Planning and Infrastructure

 

Sealing of the Angurugu-Umbakumba road was completed in August 2012. The work provided training and employment for at least 20 local people and is an enormous boon for the community in terms of travel time, road safety, community safety and economic development.

LIP

The aged care centre driveway was sealed.

IRSD SA

Safety improvements to the Rowell Highway, including traffic control measures, an overtaking lane and improvements to the airport intersection were completed in June 2012.

LIP Groote Eylandt RPA

A $400,000 upgrade to the Emerald River road was completed in late 2011.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The $20 million sealing of the Angurugu to Umbakumba road was completed in August 2012 with joint funding from the Australian and Northern Territory Governments and GEBIE. GEBIE also made in-kind contributions of an additional $2 million.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The sealing of the Angurugu to Umbakumba road provided training and employment for at least 20 local people and is an enormous boon for the community in terms of travel time, road safety, community safety and economicdevelopment.

LIP

Detailed town planning study in consultation with the Office of Township Leasing, EastArnhemShireCouncil, GEMCO and the AnindilyakwaLandCouncil, was completed in August 2010.

LIP

The town plan was gazetted in August 2010.

LIP

Construction completed of three staff houses.

 

Negotiations are underway between the NT Department of Housing and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises (GEBIE) to construct 14 houses for government employees, including four for teaching staff.

LIP

Upgrades to the arterial roads on Groote Eylandt are ongoing under the RPA.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

 

Galiwin’ku

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Ninety new houses and 74 refurbishments complete as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

Modifications on 27 houses to make them more suitable for disability access were completed in December 2011.

LIP

A Healthy Homes Working Group was established in September 2011 and has ably assisted with many critical housing issues.

LIP

All new homes have secure storage facilities.

LIP

Replacement of rusted power poles.

IRSD SA

Schooling

 

School attendance plan is in place and is supported by the NT Government Every Child Every Day Strategy.

NTG.

As at June 2012, five Indigenous assistant teachers are now employed at the college under the Remote Indigenous Teacher Education Program (RITEP).

LIP

Shepherdson College has a comprehensive 3pm-9pm adult education programme of activities. All 12 participants passed their drivers licence course.

LIP

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) Shepherdson College received a multi-purpose community hall (incorporating a cyclone shelter), a science centre and manual arts work area, which were completed in 2011.

LIP, BER

The Indigenous Ranger Cadetship programme commenced at Shepherdson College in 2013.

 

School Nutrition Program provides breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Yolngu cultural training is provided to teachers at the school.

 

Shepherdson College developed a successful model of English acquisition based on a bilingual model, which was completed in December 2010 – a bilingual approach to education is delivered with English as the predominant language of instruction supported by first language and enriched with an early years bi-literacy approach up to Year 2.

LIP

Vocational Education Training in Schools (VETiS) Master Plan has been completed and is updated each year.

LIP

Aboriginal Benefits Account funding was approved for a school bus for Shepherdson College.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Shepherdson College has received funding to build a facility to deliver qualifications in horticulture and community services.

TTC

Eight new teacher houses have been provided to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

There are two Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) projects to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parenting Support Services Program (FaFT‑IPSS) is in operation and the integration of early childhood services and parenting support strategies are now ongoing. The FaFT Family Educators and Indigenous Family Liaison Officers are providing services including playgroups, home visits and support for children entering preschool.

LIP

The FaFT‑IPSS Family Liaison Officers are completing a Certificate III in Community Services Work.

LIP

An Early Childhood Coordinator and a Cultural Adviser/Liaison Officer have been employed to lead the integration of family services tailored to the Galiwin'ku community and its surrounding service delivery area.

LIP

NTG has appointed a Child and Family Leader (early Childhood Coordinator) and Yolngu Liaison Officer.

LIP

Health workers have access to additional early childhood materials through FaFT‑IPSS. They are working with MiwatjHealth to develop and deliver appropriate resources.

LIP

The preschool programme is being delivered in the community for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year by an early childhood teacher.

LIP

An early childhood crèche commenced operating in Galiwin’ku.

 

Health

 

Machado Joseph Disease Foundation (MJD) funding was provided under the IRSD SA for the MJD Foundation to engage with families affected by MJD in Galiwin’ku.

IRSD SA

The Australian Government provided funding to Miwatj Health to build new houses for two new health workers – construction of the houses was completed in June 2011.

LIP, IRSD SA

Two Indigenous mental health workers are working in the community and a mental health nurse visits Galiwin’ku every second week.

LIP

The Indigenous Sport Unit and East Arnhem Shire are continuing to develop a Sport and Technology initiative. Core sports such as AFL and basketball are being played regularly.

 

An aged care bus equipped with a disabled access ramp (space for four wheelchairs) was purchased in September 2011 by East Arnhem Shire Council.

LIP

Accommodation for the Aged and Disability Care Case Centre was built in June 2011; the upgrade to the Aged and Disability Care Centre was completed in July 2012. Relocation of services and an official opening occurred in February 2013.

LIP

A review of the Oral Health Program was conducted to seek opportunities for service improvement – as a result, dentists visiting the community are now using the dental unit at the local Ngalkanbuy Clinic.

LIP

Low aromatic fuel was made available to help prevent petrol sniffing.

 

Licensing of three community stores helps to ensure availability of fresh food and groceries all year round.

 

An additional 19 community aged care places were allocated to East Arnhem Shire Council in 2012 for RSD sites, with six places allocated to Galiwin’ku to expand available services.

LIP

High care places, including high care dementia specific places, which were allocated to another provider in the region, are in the process of being transferred to East Arnhem Shire Council so that the service can be further expanded to cater for aged persons requiring a higher level of care – these places will be available for Galiwin’ku as needed.

LIP

A review of waste management was conducted and ongoing operation and maintenance has progressed.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

The volunteer emergency response unit was established in July 2009 and volunteers have been trained for marine search and rescue, fire response and storm damage response.

LIP

The Galiwin’ku Northern Territory Emergency Service (NTES) Volunteer Unit was provided with a dedicated emergency services demountable building that was erected in the Galiwin’ku Police precinct in June 2013. This building provides the base for NTES administrative and operational activities for the Galiwin’ku area.

LIP

Two Remote Aboriginal Family Community Workers are now living and working in the community providing familysupport.

CtG NT NPA, SFNT

The Volatile Substance Abuse Management Plan was gazetted in May 2012 and is now in effect.

LIP

The new school hall is now a designated community shelter for emergency events.

LIP

The local Counter Disaster Plan is current.

LIP

Minimum service standards for child protection and related services, including an agreed programme to implement these standards were developed in 2011.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in October 2012. As at December 2013, 148 people had gained a learner licence and 27 people had gained a provisional licence.

LIP

A Community Transport Planning workshop was held in July 2011 to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

Education on dog management has been delivered.

IRSD SA

A community night patrol is operating in the community.

 

The new Galiwin’ku police station was opened in March 2009.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established at Galiwinku and the Community Safety Committee meets regularly to identify, implement and monitor strategies.

 

Economic Participation

 

Forty-six apprentices were in training as at April/June quarter 2012.

LIP

Consultation has commenced to prepare a Town Plan (NT Planning Scheme Area Plan and Zoning map).

LIP

A Galiwin’ku jobs profile was published in 2011.

LIP

The Community Enterprises Australia Birrk Birrk Training Shop was opened in April 2012.

BER

Delivery of economic, commercial and financial literacy training that meets community needs and assists with knowledge in the areas of money management, entrepreneurship, financial wealth and home ownership – Anglicare are funded to provide Commonwealth Financial Counselling and East Arnhem Shire Council are funded to provide Money Management services to 30 June 2014

LIP

A draft study on the Galiwin’ku Visitor’s Accommodation Centre was completed in September 2012 – the study explores opportunities for commercial visitor accommodation to support services and economic development inGaliwin’ku

LIP

Support for the Gumurr Marthakal Rangers under the Working on Country Program (WCP).

 

Vocational Education and Training (VET) and apprenticeships offered in schools and outside of schools are aligned with community employment pathways.

LIP

The Galiwin’ku Futures Forum was held on 2 August 2012 to provide information on employment options and business development services available to community members.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

A mobile morgue is operating to meet the community’s needs in the short to medium term.

LIP

DEEWR has provided extensive organisational capacity support to Marthakal Employment Services (MES) to build governance and planning including 12 months with Matrix and a further 3 months by Colmar Brunton.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

A Local Reference Group (LRG) has been established.

 

Elected members of East Arnhem Shire Council are receiving ongoing professional development to enable them to better understand and undertake their roles.

LIP

The Government Engagement Coordinator (GEC) and Indigenous Engagement Officer (IEO) work to coordinate local consultative bodies and ensure meetings are aligned and encourage community input.

 

Two leadership workshops were held to support the Local Reference Group in 2011.

LIP

A research project that maps the community governance arrangements and community engagement for Galiwin'ku was completed and presented to the BoM in late June 2012.

LIP

The LRG has worked with the Australian Government to develop an integrated and strategic programme of community governance and leadership support and training that suits the needs of the men, women and youthofGaliwin'ku.

 

Galiwin’ku LCAP delivered by Gadupu Training Aboriginal Corporation in May 2013.

LIP

 

Gapuwiyak

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

The 40 year housing lease was signed September 2010.

LIP

Fifty one new houses and 51 refurbishments complete as at 30 June 2013.

LIP, NPARIH

Remote Housing Northern Territory has completed a review of the Census occupancy data against the Tenancy Management Data and are working with Regional Housing Teams to determine current needs against demographicprofiles.

LIP

Schooling

 

Mens/Boys Workshop was held in 2012.

IRSD SA

A school attendance plan has been implemented and is supported by the NT Government’s EveryChildEveryDayStrategy.

LIP

VET centre was completed in June 2012 and a Registered Training Organisation identified to run courses.

LIP

Gapuwiyak School received a multi-purpose pavilion, a science centre and an ICT upgrade under the Building the Education Revolution Program, with works completed in mid-2011.

BER

The Gapuwiyak Strong Women’s Group has been established and is actively supporting parent and student engagement to encourage attendance.

LIP

The school employed a Yolngu Attendance and Engagement Officer to promote school attendance initiatives.

LIP

The school in partnership with the Department of Education and Children’s Services, Registered Training Organisations and the community, developed a Vocational Education and Training in Schools master plan.

LIP

A school nutrition programme has been established and is ongoing.

CtG NT NPA, SFNT

Two new teacher houses have been provided to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program, Gapuwiyak School has received funding as a partner in the East Arnhem Trade Training Centre, to deliver qualifications in community services, horticulture, constructionandengineering.

TTC

There are two Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) projects to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parenting Support Services(FaFT‑IPSS) Family Educator and Indigenous Family Liaison Officer are providing a range of services including dual generational playgroups, parentworkshops, home visiting, books in homes and transition to preschool.

LIP

Certificate III Community Services training was delivered through the FaFT‑IPSS for the local Indigenous FaFT Family Liaison Officers.

LIP

In the April/June quarter 2012, two playgroup leaders partially completed their qualification. One new staff member commenced training (through FaFT‑IPSS programme).

LIP

An early childhood crèche now operates in Gapuwiyak.

LIP

Health

 

A mental health nurse is now visiting every four to six weeks. A psychiatrist visits the community three times everyyear.

LIP

The Oral Health Program has been reviewed and a monthly service now a regular occurrence and being maintained by Oral Health Services NT dentist based in Gove.

LIP

Childhood dental team attends regular oral hygiene education during their community visits. School staff run OralHealth programmes as part of their regular curriculum, with support from Health Services.

LIP

Non-smoking initiatives are ongoing, including making participation in local NT AFL programmes contingent on playersquitting.

LIP

The NT AFL is working with the clinic to promote health initiatives. Participation in major events has been made contingent on players undergoing health checks.

 

The Health Centre Clinical Equipment was reviewed in March 2011 with no equipment in need of replacing.

LIP

Completed a model of service review that will inform further aged care and disability service and facility development.

LIP

The Aged Care service provides meals on wheels and respite care.

 

In 2012, East Arnhem Shire Council began providing three community aged care places to Gapuwiyak.

LIP

Nicotine abatement products are readily available from the Health Centre.

LIP

A junior AFL competition has been established, with games played on Saturday mornings.

 

Licensing of the community store helps to ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

Safe Communities

 

The Remote Aboriginal Family and Community Worker Program is operational and a Child Safety and Wellbeing Practitioner now works in the community.

LIP, CtG NT NPA, SFNT

Construction of the new police complex was completed in June 2013. The complex includes a court room facility and accommodation for an Aboriginal Community Police Officer.

LIP

A volunteer emergency unit is active and training for the unit is ongoing.

LIP

The Gapuwiyak counter disaster plan is under development with Police, Emergency Services and East Arnhem Shire. It is a living document and will be amended as circumstances change.

LIP

Gapuwiyak now has an ongoing police presence.

 

Establishment of the Community Safety Working Party to work with community members to develop place based strategies that will address safety concerns.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in October 2012. As at December 2013, 116 people had gained a learner licence and 48 people had gained a provisional licence. Adual-drive vehicle has been provided to support this programme.

LIP

A community night patrol is operating in the community.

 

Education on dog management has been delivered.

IRSD SA

Economic Participation

 

Two information seminars were held for interested persons and organisations to engage with government and private industry regarding economic opportunities associated with NPARIH works and infrastructure development.

 

As at the April/June quarter 2012, 18 people completed their Certificates II in Construction and 22 people had construction safety white cards.

 

Four Gapuwiyak people were employed building the police complex, and 15 have employment through the NPARIH housing project.

 

A community transport workshop was held in 2011 to inform future government transport policy.

LIP

Upgrades to the Mainoru Creek crossing, including a new bridge was completed in November 2011.

LIP

The Town Plan comprising an area plan, zoning map and town’s named internal roads was finalised in May 2013.

LIP

A Business Directory Project commenced in May 2013 to develop a supplier’s guide profiling local businesses andcapability

LIP

A funding application for an interim mobile morgue solution was successful and is being operated by Arnhem Land Progress Aboriginal Corporation (ALPA) until a prospective business operator is identified.

LIP

The Gapuwiyak Jobs Profile, detailing current positions, skill requirements and jobs was published in 2011.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

A leadership workshop was held to support young leaders to become more confident and better represent their needs. The Mala Leaders Group was established prior to the LIP process and continues to work as the RSD consultative body in Gapuwiyak.

 

The Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service facilities have been upgraded and an operator has been recruited.

 

Leadership development initiatives are ongoing, targeting youth, shire councillors and members of the MalaLeadersGroup.

 

 

Gunbalanya

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixty two new houses and 70 refurbishments and rebuilds completed under NPARIH as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

A Service Level Agreement between the NT Government and West Arnhem Shire Council (WASC) was agreed in June 2010 to improve housing repairs and maintenance.

LIP

Gunbalanya leaders and Traditional Owners provide ongoing input to housing requirements through the HousingReference Group.

LIP

The NT Department of Housing has completed the staff housing demand exercise for a three year period (2012–13 to 2014‑15) with information provided from NTG agencies. Demand data will be reviewed annually and collected everythree years.

LIP

A rolling Capital Works Program (CWP) is in place and with priority locations identified from the Government Employee Housing (GEH) demand exercise. Priority locations are being reviewed to take into account current utilisation of stock, relevant approvals, Aboriginal Area Protection Authority (AAPA), Land Tenure, availability of serviced land and budget considerations. The current GEH CWP includes 3 dwellings being built at Gunbalanya.

LIP

A water and energy efficiency action plan has been drafted and endorsed through a community workshop. A project partnership between Power and Water, Department of Housing, and the West Arnhem Shire has now employed and trained 5 water and energy conservation officers.

LIP

IRSD SA funding provided for a sewerage pump station.

LIP, IRSD SA

Schooling

 

One Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project to scope involvement of community and school on holistic approach to school attendance and engagement.

LIP

The community has identified and trained local tutors to provide students with additional learning opportunities.

LIP

The school council provides active input into traditional curriculum content development. New teachers receive cultural induction.

LIP

To maximise attendance opportunities, the school year was revised in 2011 to align with the wet season.

LIP

The School Community Partnership Agreement was signed in early September 2012.

LIP

An attendance plan has been incorporated into the school’s Annual Operational Plan under the EveryChildEveryDayStrategy.

LIP

The Sporting Chance Program has commenced in Gunbalanya and uses sport and recreation to engage Indigenous boys and girls in their schooling.

FaHCSIA

Two new teacher houses have been provided to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

Gunbalanya Community Education Centre received a new multi-purpose pavilion, new science centre and upgrades to the administration centre and school canteen.

BER

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Gunbalanya School has received funding as a partner in the West Arnhem Trade Training Centre, to deliver qualifications in agriculture and resources and infrastructure.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

An antenatal programme established to help pregnant mothers.

LIP

Certificate III Community Services training was delivered through the FaFT‑IPSS for the local Indigenous FaFT Family Liaison Officers.

LIP

The (FaFT‑IPSS) programme has been established with a Family Educator, Indigenous Family Liaison Officer and three play group leaders providing a range of early childhood services.

 

A review and report on staffing requirements under the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care (NQFECEC) has been completed.

 

A joint community member and James Cook University non-smoking programme for pregnant mothers was run in2012.

LIP

A preschool programme is delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year, by an early childhood teacher.

LIP

Establishment of the Building the Remote Early Childhood Workforce Pilot Project which will focus on providing children services training for child care staff and VET in schools and School-Based Apprentices for secondarystudents.

LIP

Land tenure and lease negotiations with community were conducted in August/September 2012 for a new Children and Family Centre. Design and documentation have been completed after extensive consultation with the community.

LIP

Clinic workers are working with a few older, strong women in the community who have committed to stop smoking to demonstrate to young women, especially pregnant women, that it is possible.

LIP

Health

 

An ophthalmologist now visits the community four times a year.

LIP

Child health checks and immunisation is fully integrated into the child health programme at the health centre. Primary health care programmes are delivered by the health centre.

LIP,
CtG NT NPA

West Arnhem Shire Council has received additional funds from NT Government to employ a Sport and Recreation Team Leader to lead the Sports Demonstration Project, involving several sport programmes.

 

The Local Reference Group has been working with James Cook University to promote anti-smoking messages.

LIP

From July 2012 regular anti-smoking education sessions have been held at the school.

LIP

Funding has been provided for an aged care centre upgrade and an aged care vehicle. Upgrades to the centre were completed in June 2012.

LIP

The clinic provides a pick-up service to ensure pregnant women and mothers attend pre and post-natal check-ups.

 

Improved education programmes are being delivered on how to maintain good health, general wellbeing, nutrition and healthy cooking.

LIP

Licensing of two community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

A remote tobacco cessation programme was established providing support for those wanting assistance and support to quit smoking.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Gunbalanya Police are trained in Road Accident Rescue. Volunteer recruiting continues. There are 4 active volunteers. The Local Counter Disaster Plan has been reviewed and is current to November 2013.

 

An implementation plan to achieve minimum service standards for child protection has been developed.

LIP

Two Remote Aboriginal Family Care Workers are working in the community.

LIP

Road Safety Officers visited the Gunbalanya School in June 2013 to deliver road safety awareness and education. Further visits are planned.

 

The Alcohol Management Plan has community agreement and is being implemented.

 

The women’s safe house is operational and is managed by a non-government organisation service provider.

 

A community night patrol is operating in the community.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established at Gunbalanya and the Community Safety Committee meets regularly to identify, implement and monitor strategies

 

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in August 2013. As at December 2013, 73 people had gained a learner licence and 8 people had gained a provisional licence.

 

Economic Participation

 

A business and economic opportunities profile was published in April 2011, to help people who want to start their own businesses in the community.

LIP

A Community Transport Planning Workshop was held in July 2011 to inform future transport service delivery.

LIP

Gazettal of the Gunbalanya Area Plan and zoning map in May 2013. Names for the town’s internal roads werealsofinalised.

LIP

Funds have been committed for major community store refurbishment. Initial design work has commenced.

 

In the April/June quarter 2012, 39 Gunbalanya people have undertaken apprenticeships.

 

Employment training has been provided at the local abattoir, as well as first aid and building and construction.

 

A business mentor worked with Injalak Arts Centre during 2012 to assist with the Centre’s successful accreditation application with Tourism Accreditation Australia Ltd. Injalak Arts is the first Art Centre in the Northern Territory to obtain this accreditation, which was attained in August 2012.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

The Arrguluk Reference Group is established and the professionalism of the meetings continues to improve. Thechairing of the meetings is rotated amongst members to provide professional development opportunities.

LIP

The Arrguluk Reference Group’s capacity to act as a representative consultative body has been bolstered by the involvement of community youth, local Indigenous teachers and West Arnhem Shire Council Aboriginal members – the added attendance and input of the latter at these meetings has informed and improved discussion.

LIP

The local health committee and Red Lily Health Board now provides advice about local health needs and prioritising and planning of local health services.

LIP

 

Lajamanu

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Lajamanu now has a housing lease in place. The 40 year lease commenced 29 June 2011 and is held by Executive Director of Township Leasing (EDTL).

LIP,
RSD NPA

Seventeen new houses and 82 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Remote Housing NT has reviewed Census occupancy data and are working with Housing Reference Groups to determine actual needs against demographic profiles together with joint discussions occurring.

LIP

Provision of tenancy training and support to assist new tenants in maintaining their homes thorough effective budgeting, home care and life skills.

LIP

Power and Water Corporation completed an assessment of Lajamanu wastewater system capacity. Initial concept design work has been completed. Improvements have been made to the pond walls. Lajamanu wastewater system planning work is incorporated into Power and Water's Remote Operations Wastewater Management Strategy.

LIP

Schooling

 

The Australian Government funds a nutrition programme for students at the school.

LIP, CtG NT NPA, SFNT

Community is implementing a ‘NO school NO shop’ policy to encourage children to be at school and not loiter around the shop during school hours.

LIP

The school now has a targeted literacy and numeracy plan.

LIP

The school has received a multi-purpose pavilion, early childhood safe area and new classrooms under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme.

BER

A school attendance plan is in place and is supported by the Northern Territory Government’s Every Child Every Day Strategy – there is a 75% attendance rate with 240 students enrolled at the school, with the majority of absenteeism due to family travel to other areas.

LIP

The school has been working in collaboration with the Community Engagement Police Officer and the local police to support students in coming to school. The school is working with the community to develop an attendance plan.

LIP

The School Community Partnership Agreement is complete and was signed on 29 November 2012.

LIP

The school, in partnership with the NT Department of Education and Children’s Services, registered training organisations and the community, developed and updated a Vocational Education and Training in Schools masterplan.

LIP

A bilingual programme is being delivered in Lajamanu School for teachers and students.

LIP

Access to additional teachers through funding provided to the NT Government.

 

Youth in Communities (YIC) programme to help young people to be more connected to school, training and community life.

 

Programmes supporting, encouraging and providing training for Indigenous school staff have commenced andareongoing.

LIP

There are 23 Indigenous community workers employed at the school in various positions, with training undertaken as and when required.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for a trade training facility was approved for Lajamanu School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are agriculture and community services.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Playgroups for parents and young children are now being run by a permanent PlayGroup Coordinator assisted by five community members acting as Teachers Assistants, with a participation rate for the month of June 2013 of 10-15 participants per day.

LIP

A review and report on staffing requirements under the National Quality Framework for Early Childhood Education and Care (NQFECEC) has been completed – 30 students are currently enrolled in the preschool which has a permanent preschool teacher assisted by a community member in the teacher’s assistant role.

 

Preschool programme is delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year, by a four-year, university qualified early childhood teacher.

LIP

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parent Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) programme has been established with a Family Educator, Indigenous Family Liaison Officer and three play group leaders providing a range of services.

LIP

Funding for a new purpose-built early childhood centre and crèche was approved, with the facility completed in February 2013 – the centre is staffed and commenced operating on 3 June 2013, with an official opening on 21August 2013.

LIP

The FaFT‑IPSS programme is currently operational with a FaFT‑IPSS Family Educator and FaFT‑IPSS Indigenous Family Liaison Officer providing a range of services including dual generational playgroups, parent workshops, home visiting, books in homes and transition to preschool.

LIP

Locational Supported Playgroup is currently operational with the permanent playgroup Coordinator assisted by a community member employed as an Assistant Teacher.

LIP

The family liaison officer has successfully completed the Certificate III in Community Services Work.

LIP

All parenting programme content to include Warlpiri Culture and links to elders - the Elders undertake programmes with the students at the Arts centre along with a bush trip.

LIP

A local Warlpiri woman is delivering parenting workshops to help young mothers care for their young children.

LIP

Health

 

Primary health care services are provided through the Lajamanu Community Health Centre.

 

The clinic has implemented measures to support attendance at specialist appointments, including a free client bus and a client database.

 

Elders actively encourage younger community members to reduce alcohol consumption when visiting Katherine and Top Springs. The Kurdiji group is currently working on a strategy to reduce marijuana consumption.

LIP

The Remote Area Health Corps now has a dental team in Kalkarindji. Lajamanu children are taken to Kalkarindji fortreatment.

LIP

Construction of a new clinic commenced in July 2012, with the official opening on 21 August 2013.

LIP

The Aged Disability Care Response Plan was tabled with Local Reference Group (LRG) members in July 2012. Asat30 January 2013, Central Desert Shire Council advised that most of the recommendations within their control have been implemented.

LIP

Increased adult and child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5'sKidsprogramme.

LIP

In late 2012, Central Desert Shire and Warlpiri Regional Youth Development entered into an MOU that outlines service delivery of sport and recreation services and support for the Sport and Recreation Officer in the community.

LIP

All community members five years of age and older undergo a yearly health examination for early detection of any major diseases or pending illnesses.

 

A comprehensive review of aged care and disability services to inform service and facility development was completed in April 2011.

LIP

Licensing of the community store to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

Chronic disease management of all community members including the elderly is case managed according to BestPractice.

 

The school has opened its gym for community use and is working with a visiting physiotherapist and occupational therapist to develop workout programmes for residents.

LIP

The Alcohol and Tobacco Coordinator for Lajamanu is based in Katherine and visits regularly to assist with programmes at the clinic.

 

Safe Communities

 

A natural disaster plan has been developed.

LIP

Lajamanu is serviced by a Remote Aboriginal Family Care Worker based in Kalkarindji.

LIP

Lajamanu Police have been trained in road crash rescue and storm rescue response. Nine volunteers are being trained to help police in emergencies and form part of the newly established Volunteer Emergency Response Team.

LIP

The women’s safe place received major infrastructure upgrades and is now operational.

 

A Community night patrol operates in the community so people can feel safe.

 

Central Desert Shire (CDS) has installed and operates fire fighting equipment, including a larger water storage facility to ensure water supply in an emergency.

LIP

A fire truck was delivered and a fire truck refill tank was installed in June 2013. Staff training is ongoing.

LIP

A Community Safety Action Plan is established at Lajamanu and the Community Safety Committee meets regularly to identify, implement and monitor strategies

 

Economic Participation

 

A construction training programme in early 2012 saw 8 participants undertaking industry training whilst involved in the local strategic housing project.

LIP

In the April/June quarter 2012, one Lajamanu trainee completed a Certificate II in Construction and nine others were completing Certificates II in Construction.

LIP

Two trainees from Lajamanu are now working on the Ntaria NPARIH project. One has been engaged as anapprenticecarpenter.

 

CDS and Warlpiri Regional Youth Development entered into a Memorandum of Understanding that outlines the sportand recreation services to be delivered in Lajamanu.

LIP

Upgrades to sections of the Buntine Highway to a two-lane sealed arterial road were completed in December 2011.

LIP

A bus service operates between Katherine and Lajamanu twice weekly.

LIP

Support for Wulaign Rangers through the Working on Country Program (WCP).

 

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

The area plan, zoning map (including naming internal roads) was gazetted in May 2012.

LIP

Improved information and communication technologies through the installation of fibre optic cables. The town has optic fibre to the exchange and construction of the fibre reticulation to NT Government sites under Digital Regions is complete, with the fibre waiting commissioning.

LIP

A report was developed on options for the provision of multi-purpose community centre or facilities that could include public library, ICT and training facilities, sport and recreation facilities.

LIP

Funding for the refurbishment of Lajamanu Longhouse Visitor Accommodation was provided with completion expected by December 2013.

IRSD SA

Governance & Leadership

 

The Lajamanu Local reference Group (LRG) is established.

RSD NPA

Central Desert Shire Council members have completed training to help them understand their jobs role as communityrepresentatives.

LIP

Community members are taking part in leadership training and mediation skills workshops.

 

A community-driven oval redevelopment leadership project is underway and is supported by the Government Engagement Coordinator and led by the Indigenous Engagement Officer.

 

LRG members and other community members were involved in the development and delivery of a Local Community Awareness Program (community led cross cultural programme), with the programme conducted in May 2013.

 

Planning and Infrastructure

 

Transformer upgrade was completed.

LIP, IRSD SA

 

Maningrida

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

One hundred and ten new houses and 117 refurbishments and rebuilds completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

All new houses are built to accommodate disability access if required. Over 30existing houses are planned to receive disability modifications.

NPARIH

A long-term lease over remote public housing was executed during August2009 for 20 years with an option to renew (effectively 40 years) for 159 public housing lots.

LIP

Remote Housing NT has completed a review of the Census occupancy data against the Tenancy Management Data and are working with Regional Housing Teams to determine current needs against demographic profiles.

LIP

There is now a Service Level Agreement between the West Arnhem Shire Council (WASC) and the NT Government for home repairs and maintenance.

 

Intensive Tenancy Support is offered to remote public housing tenants entering into a formal Tenancy Agreement.

 

Equipping and connections of new bores to new storage tank including headwork.

IRSD SA

Schooling

 

The Remote Indigenous Teacher Education programme at Maningrida School has commenced with Indigenous Assistant Teachers employed.

LIP

A school attendance plan is in place and supported by the NT Government Every Child Every Day Strategy.

LIP

In late 2012, the Maningrida Community College completed a two day Cross Cultural Awareness workshop with all staff run by Aboriginal and Resource Development Services Inc. Follow-up workshop was scheduled for October2013.

LIP

The You Can Do It national trainer has completed training with all school staff as of June 2013 to assist with strategies to address bullying and teasing.

LIP

Adult Education classes have been running at the school since early 2013 addressing a range of vocations.

LIP

Three Assistant Teachers were enrolled in Certificate III qualifications, two were enrolled in Certificate IV training, and one was studying for an Associate Diploma.

 

Maningrida School improvements under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme include a language centre, resource centre and cyclone shelter, a new fence and painting of facilities.

BER

Primary classrooms at the school were upgraded in mid-2012.

 

Three school students attended the National Science Awards Ceremony in Darwin.

IRSD SA

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Six new teacher houses to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

There is one Parental and Community Education (PaCE) project to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Maningrida School has received funding to build a facility to deliver qualifications in aged care, community services and horticulture.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parent Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) programme has been established with a Family Educator and Indigenous Family Liaison Officer providing a range of early childhood services.

 

Four Maningrida child care workers, including Family Liaison Officers, have completed Certificates III in CommunityServices.

 

A dedicated remote area midwife provides ante-natal education around nutrition and a nutritionist visits the communityregularly.

LIP

Preschool is being offered in Maningrida for at least 15 hours per week with teachers and assistant teachers studying to increase their qualifications.

LIP

Design and documentation for a Children and Family Centre (CFC) has been completed with extensive consultation undertaken with the community. Tenders for the CFC were awarded to RiCon Construction Pty Ltd. Construction commenced in mid-September 2013, with an expected completion date of April 2014.

LIP, IECD NPA

Two local Strong Women Workers have commenced: the women will continue to be part of a two-way knowledge transfer between health clinic staff, health development staff and community members in order to develop solid foundations for the Maningrida Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Culture Program.

LIP

FaFT‑IPSS capacity building has been successful, with early childhood playgroups able to operate independently of the Family Educator.

 

The Children and Family Centre will include a childcare centre to cater for 50 children. The school currently runs a crèche service.

LIP

Health

 

There is a now a pick-up and drop-off service provided for people who need to attend medical appointments.

LIP

An anti-smoking campaign is running in the community and nicotine abatement products are now available to hospital patients who quit smoking.

LIP

A child health doctor and nurse are running targeted clinics in association with FaFT‑IPSS playgroups.

LIP

Men’s adult and sexual health checks are commencing in collaboration with the local AFL competition.

 

The health centre renal ready room upgrade was completed in November 2011.

LIP

An automated gas chlorination plant and fluoridation system has been operating at the Maningrida water supply sinceAugust 2012.

LIP

In consultation with WASC and the LRG, the NT Government developed a report on the status of Sport and Recreation facilities, including priorities for upgrades. The report was completed and accepted in early 2013.

LIP

Training of local staff to deliver health services programmes has been expanded using on site as well as regionaltraining options.

LIP

The NT Government and WASC have worked in partnership to implement sports that reflect community wants, with measures being put in place to ensure training and regular competitions for basketball and AFL are implemented andsustained.

LIP

Continued support for the QUIT 100 Club to support residents and families to quit smoking.

LIP

Aged care services provided through the Malala Flexible Aged Care Service and Bawinanga Aged Care.

 

Licensing of two community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year around.

 

WASC has received additional funds from NT Government to employ a Sport and Recreation Team Leader to oversee the sports and recreation programme.

 

Availability of low aromatic fuel to help prevent petrol sniffing.

 

New Directions: Mothers and Babies Program – NT Department of Health provides services to Top End and Maningrida region.

 

Safe Communities

 

NT Emergency Services (NTES) now provide Road Accident Rescue, Coastal Marine Search and Rescue and Storm Damage operations. The volunteer numbers are strong with 20 registered NTES Volunteers.

LIP

Community Safety Action Plan for Maningrida is completed and the Community Safety Committee meets regularly to identify, implement and monitor strategies.

LIP

The Remote Aboriginal Family and Community Program (RAFC) is operational and is providing family support.

LIP

The Alcohol Management Plan has been finalised, signed and is being implemented.

CtG NT NPA

The NT Government funds child safety services through Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation (BAC), including a nightfoot patrol.

 

A Community Child Safety and Wellbeing practitioner works in the community through the RAFC.

LIP

The Maningrida Local Counter Disaster Plan has been reviewed and is current until November 2013.

LIP

Upgrades to the Women’s Safe House and Men’s Place were completed in July 2012.

 

Alcohol and other drug counselling services are available in the community.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in May 2013. As at December 2013, 143 people had gained a learner licence and 40 people had gained a provisional licence.

LIP

Funding approved in April 2013 for a Maningrida fire truck. A MoU between five local organisations has been signed to cover operating costs.

IRSD SA

Economic Participation

 

Two training programmes were supported for 12 participants to undertake construction and painting skills to enable them to gain repairs and maintenance work through the WASC.

 

A labour market profile detailing current positions, skill requirements and jobs was completed in 2011.

LIP

The Maningrida Arts and Culture Centre has opened.

 

Community participation in Money Management Services has increased from 1,000 to 2,500 in early 2012.

 

Support for Djelk Rangers through the Working on Country Program (WCP). They are also supplied with twoseavessels.

 

A Community Transport Planning Workshop was held in October 2010 to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

A Maningrida Business Directory was launched to Australian Government, NTG, Shire and private enterprise in June2013.

LIP

A final report has been completed and sent to Banks and the Department of Regional Development to assist with removing barriers to accessing finance for investment on Aboriginal Land Rights Act land.

LIP

Eighty eight job seekers placed into current activities and 12 job placements have been made.

LIP

The airport road has been resealed.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

The LRG is established and is supported by the Government Engagement Coordinator and the Indigenous Engagement Officer to work on actions in the Local Implementation Plan.

 

The LRG has been endorsed by WASC to act as the Council Advisory board for Maningrida

 

 

Milingimbi

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Sixty seven new dwellings and 46 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

A Service Level Agreement between the East Arnhem Shire Council (EASC) and the NT Government is in place to provide home maintenance services.

LIP

Home repairs and maintenance times have been improved, with shorter repair response times and more positive client feedback.

LIP

A town lease was finalised to enable people to own their own homes.

LIP

Funding provided to NT Government for immediate works to mitigate unsustainable water supply, expected completion in December 2013.

IRSD SA

Funding provided to NT Government for constructing new elevated and ground level water storage tanks, expected completion in November 2013.

IRSD SA

Schooling

 

A school attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Strategy.

LIP

A school-based manager maintains links between school and clan groups through a team of camp workers.

LIP

The community has established a ‘no school, no store’ policy where children are not served in the local store duringschool hours.

LIP

Adult language, literacy and numeracy programmes are established and ongoing at the school.

LIP

The Milingimbi School received new classrooms, an early learning centre a science centre, ICT upgrades and school grounds refurbishments as part of the Building the Education Revolution Program (BER).

BER

Outside School Hours Care to look after children while parents are at work.

LIP

The school library continues to be accessible after hours for a variety of activities. Cross-cultural courses have been held during school holidays.

LIP

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Youth in Communities (YIC) programme to help young people to be more connected with school, training and community life.

 

The school operates a school bus to pick-up and drop-off students, with a view of increasing school attendance.

 

One Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for a trade training facility was approved at Milingimbi School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are community services and horticulture.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parent Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) programme has been established with a Family Educator and two Indigenous Family Liaison officers working to organise play groups, workshops and other early childhood services.

LIP

The NT Government is supporting the Indigenous Family Liaison Officers to study for a Certificate III in CommunityServices.

LIP

A preschool programme is delivered and a preschool attendance plan is in place.

LIP

Service providers are continuing to work with the community to integrate tailored family services to support families with young children and provide early learning and parenting support outreach services to the broader community.

LIP

Continued delivery of early learning and parenting support, including preschool readiness, through implementation of the Abecedarian approach, including Conversational Reading and Learning Games and Books in Homes.

LIP

Health

 

An electronic patient record system was introduced at the clinic in January 2012.

LIP

Enhanced oral health services are being delivered on average four days per month. 97 patients were treated in the first half of 2012.

LIP

The Aged Care facility in Milingimbi has been completed and is operational.

LIP

Primary health care services through the Milingimbi Community Health Centre.

LIP

Construction of a new health clinic was completed in May 2013 and it is now operating.

LIP

Professional development plans have been established and are ongoing for all clinic staff.

LIP

Playgrounds, schools and government areas have been declared smoke-free and signs have been erected.

LIP

Nicotine abatement products are readily available through the Health Centre.

LIP

An aged and disability care review was completed to meet further aged care and disability requirements.

LIP

Licensing of the community store to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

Purchase of equipment to establish a gymnasium in the Milingimbi Youth, Sport and Recreation Hall.

IRSD SA

Safe Communities

 

A Police overnight facility is established at Milingimbi. The community is serviced regularly by police fromRamingining.

LIP

Milingimbi is included in the Maningrida Local Counter Disaster Plan which has been reviewed and is current until November2013.

LIP

Community education around the meaning of warrants and laws was conducted during April 2012.

LIP

The cyclone shelter has been completed and outstanding plumbing work was completed in mid-2012.

LIP

Community road safety and awareness was delivered in Milingimbi in November 2012 as part of the road safety song competition. A school education session will be organised for 2014 to coincide with a DriveSafe NT remote visit.

LIP

Education on dog management has been delivered.

LIP, IRSD SA

Community night patrol to assist community safety.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Milingimbi community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meets regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

Funding from the IRSD SA enabled road repairs and upgrades in October 2011.

IRSD SA

Job Services Australia provides courses for Milingimbi people, including Certificate I in Written & Spoken English. As at 31 December 2012, 33 community members were enrolled in General Education for Adults and SpokenEnglishcourses.

LIP

Two local people are employed under the Animal Management Program through EASC.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in July 2011.

LIP

The Men’s Skills Shed, completed in July 2012, is being used to make cupboards, tables and chairs.

LIP

A Futures Forum was held in June 2012.

LIP

The Milingimbi Town Plan, including an area plan and zoning map was gazetted in May 2012.

LIP

A labour market profile detailing current positions, skill requirements and jobs was completed in 2011.

LIP

Between 1 April and 30 June 2013, 8 job seekers were placed into employment.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

The Local Reference Group (LRG) is established. Two workshops have been held to improve the LRG’s leadershipskills.

LIP

Ongoing governance and leadership training is provided by EASC to elected Indigenous council members.

LIP

Milingimbi’s Gadapu Indigenous Training Centre Aboriginal Corporation ran their first Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) in July 2012, and a second LCAP in Milingimbi in April 2013. They also facilitated an LCAP in neighbouring Galiwin’ku in May 2013. Training is available when required.

LIP

An Indigenous Governance and Leadership project was signed between the NT Government and Charles Darwin University (CDU) on 7 June 2013 for a two year project to further investigate governance structures with community.

LIP

 

Ngukurr

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Fifty nine new houses and 60 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

A Housing Reference Group (HRG) has been established and meets at least 4 times a year. The community is consulted about housing needs through the HRG.

 

Funding for replacement of SVC (water valves) was provided to NT Government.

IRSD SA

Funding for upgrading of power feeder cables was provided to Northern Territory Government.

IRSD SA

Government Employment Housing Strategy Capital Works Program includes 2 dwellings being built at Ngukurr.

NTG

Water and energy saving messages have been broadcast via radio and local print media. Power and Water have scoped a project proposal to work with the community of Ngukurr on water efficient garden design and management. This will be undertaken over the course of the 2013/14 financial year.

 

Ngukurr wastewater system capacity assessment has been completed for treatment and disposal elements. Initialconcept design work has been completed for the treatment ponds and disposal. Ngukurr wastewater system planningwork is incorporated into Power and Water's Remote Operations Wastewater Management Strategy.

 

New Bores, rising main and elevated water storage completed.

 

Schooling

 

A Senior Cultural Advisor and Attendance Officer is in place as part of the Attendance Management Plan.

LIP

A School nutrition programme is established and ongoing.

LIP,
CtG NT NPA

Two duplexes have been installed to address school staff accommodation needs.

LIP

Students in Ngukurr are being supported by Yugul Mangi Development Aboriginal Corporation (YMDAC) to studyRural Operations.

 

The Parent and Community Engagement (PaCE) programme provides workshops to parents, caregivers and community members to improve community awareness about education and encourage attendance.

 

A school attendance plan is in place and supported by Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

LIP

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme, Ngukurr School received a new classroom block, andexterior and interior painting.

BER

Ngukurr School runs an exercise programme every day for all students.

 

Four new teacher houses to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

Early Childhood Studies trainer position filled and training delivered from term three 2012.

 

The Strong Start Bright Future Service Delivery model was implemented from term three 2012.

 

Representation from the seven clans on the new School Council structure.

 

Vocational Education and Training in Schools Masterplan completed and updated each year.

 

Attendance plan developed aligned with School Enrolment and Attendance Measure initiative and Dept. of Education and Children’s Services policy.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Ngukurr School has received funding as a partner in the Ngukurr CEC Rural Studies Trade Training Centre, to deliver qualifications in rural operations, hospitality and resources and infrastructure.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parent Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) programme commenced in January 2011; a Family Educator works with the community to give parent workshops, visit homes and helps kidsstartpreschool.

LIP

Traditional Owners have given approval for the NT Government to build a Children and Family Centre. Workhascommenced.

LIP,
IECD NPA

Ngukurr has an operational antenatal programme to help pregnant women.

 

Ngukurr now has an operational interim childcare centre/crèche.

 

New Directions: Mothers and Babies Program (NDMB) - Sunrise Health Service provides services to the Katherine East region including Ngukurr.

IECD NPA

Building Remote Early Childhood Workforce Trainer has continued to deliver training in Certificate I, II and III Community Services (Children's Services) to staff providing services to children and senior school students.

 

Design and documentation for the Children and Family Centre is complete. Extensive community consultation hastaken place.

 

Fifteen (15) hours per week of preschool is provided at Ngukurr. Both preschool teachers are primary trained.

 

Health

 

Funding was approved under the IRSD SA for the MJD Foundation to engage with families affected by MJD.

IRSD SA

A new health clinic will be built with funds provided by the Australian Government.

LIP

A new community store has been built and opened in July 2011.

 

Ngukurr’s main swimming pool has received an upgrade.

 

Playgrounds, schools, and government buildings in Ngukurr are now smoke free areas.

LIP

A local football league was established with support from AFL NT in late 2011.

 

A comprehensive review of aged care and disability services to inform service and facility development was completed in July 2011.

LIP

Refurbishments and new bathroom facilities for the Ngukurr aged care facility.

 

A local Women’s eight team basketball competition was established by Roper Gulf Shire Council.

 

Nicotine Abatement products are now readily available from the Sunrise Health Centre.

LIP

A plan has been developed to manage wild dogs and other animals in the community.

LIP

Specialist Outreach NT and Sunrise Health Service have committed to consulting with the community on additional services required under the Indigenous Chronic Disease element of the Medical Specialists OutreachAssistanceProgram.

LIP

Oral Health Program services were improved: Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5'sKidsprogramme.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

The NT Police, Fire and Emergency Services and Roper Gulf Shire have a plan for and are better prepared to respond, when cyclones hit the Ngukurr community.

LIP

The Women's Safe Place underwent major infrastructure upgrades and is now operational.

 

Ngukurr Police now have Road Accident Rescue capability.

LIP

Volunteer recruiting for a volunteer emergency response team has commenced.

LIP

Roper Gulf Shire Council is working with the community to encourage safe driving – the council has installed traffic calming devices and will install pedestrian crossings on the roads.

LIP

A Community Transport Planning Workshop was held in August 2011 to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

Minimum service standards for child protection and related services have been developed and Remote Aboriginal Family Care Workers are working in the community.

LIP

Education on dog management has been delivered.

IRSD SA

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in July 2013. As at December 2013, 64 people had gained a learner licence and 20 people had gained a provisional licence.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Ngukurr community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meets regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

A locally-owned concrete batching plant began operating in September 2011 and supplied concrete to the NPARIHhousing works.

 

A second batching plant has been purchased and is based at a nearby mine project.

 

Over 32 Ngukurr people have been employed as part of the NPARIH housing project.

 

The Bodhi Bus currently operates twice a week bus services between Katherine and Ngukurr.

LIP

The Ngukurr Business and Economic Opportunities profile detailing current positions and jobs was published in September 2011.

LIP

Futures Forum was held in August 2010 with an emphasis on employment and training.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

A detailed surveyed of transport infrastructure in and around Ngukurr was completed in 2010. A funding submission for upgrades to strategic roads was developed and lodged.

 

An area plan, including a zoning map and internal town roads was gazetted in October 2011.

LIP

The Australian Government in partnership with the NT Government announced major upgrades to the Wilton River Crossing and Roper River Crossings – construction is expected to take place in the 2015 and 2016 Dry Seasons.

LIP

Cross cultural training courses were held in August 2012 at Wyagiba and at Ngukurr.

 

As at June 2013, 13 apprentices were undertaking Roller Operations training. This entry level skill set will enable local Ngukurr people to secure full-time employment and establish a long-term career pathway within Western Desert Resources mining operations. Upon completion of this training, participants will have an opportunity to commence full time employment at Western Desert Resources Iron Ore Mining project. AWorkforcePlantemplateiscurrentlyunderdevelopment.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

The Local Reference Group (LRG) is established.

 

The LRG is developing a mentor programme to support youth to become local leaders. The Youth Centre has regular meetings called 'Youth Voice' where youth can express their views and service providers can attend to discuss issues and/or developments.

LIP

Purchase of non-portable sound equipment to support Ngukurr’s Inaugural Cultural Festival held in 2010. Items available for future use under the sport and recreation programmes.

IRSD SA

Purchase of a portable public announcement (PA) system, marquees and lighting to support Ngukurr’s Inaugural Cultural festival held in 2010. Items available for future community meetings and events.

IRSD SA

 

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

A long-term lease for public housing is now in place allowing planning for new houses under NPARIH to commence.

LIP

Thirty two new houses and 66 refurbishments completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Provision of tenancy training and support to assist new tenants in maintaining their homes through effective budgeting, home care and life skills.

LIP

Funding approved for connection to Alice Springs grid expected to be completed in March 2014.

IRSD SA

Water and energy saving messages have been broadcast via radio and local print media (when available).

 

Drilling work including bore pads and fencing has been completed. Water storage tank has been installed.

IRSD SA

Ntaria wastewater system capacity assessment has been completed for treatment and disposal elements. The next stage is for detailed design work for the treatment ponds and disposal. Ntaria wastewater system planning work is incorporated into Power & Water's Remote Operations Wastewater Management Strategy.

 

Schooling

 

The Ntaria School VET Facility and Technical Studies Classroom were completed in November 2011.

LIP

A VET in Schools trainer has been appointed to manage the new VET facilities.

LIP

VET in Schools Masterplan completed and updated each year.

 

A school nutrition programme is being delivered and all staff have successfully completed a three week FoodSafeProgram.

LIP, CtG NT NPA, SFNT

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme, Ntaria School received an early learning centre and an outdoor teaching and learning area.

BER

The school curriculum now incorporates a physical activity component with 30 minutes of physical activity each morning and Friday afternoon sport.

LIP

School attendance is still an issue in Ntaria, the School Enrolment and Attendance Measure (SEAM) commenced in Term 2, 2013 and is now fully operational with 5 families working with Centrelink social staff.

SFNT

A school attendance plan is in place and is supported by the NT Government’s Every Child Every Day Strategy.

LIP

In 2013 Literacy and Numeracy for Work (Stage 1) was introduced to compliment the VET in Schools Community Studies and Rural Operations Certificate II.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Ntaria School has received funding to build a facility to deliver qualifications in community services, hospitality and horticulture.

LIP, TTC

Fourteen new and refurbished houses for teachers were completed in 2011.

 

Department of Education and Training has implemented a rigorous programme of recruiting high performing teachers to remote schools.

LIP

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers - Indigenous Parenting Support Services (FaFT‑IPSS) programme Indigenous Family Liaison Officer has completed a Certificate III Community Services Work.

LIP

The FaFT‑IPSS programme Family Educator and Indigenous Family Liaison Officer provide a range of early childhood services including playgroups, parent workshops, and transition to preschool support.

LIP

A 40 place child care centre has been agreed by Traditional Owners through the LRG.

LIP, NTG

A Child and Family Leader is employed in Ntaria to lead integration and coordination of early childhood services.

 

Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation (WAHAC) operates an antenatal health programme.

LIP

A preschool programme is delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year, by primary trained teacher. The assistant teacher is studying towards a Bachelor of Training.

LIP

The FaFT programme continues to engage families in early childhood and education held in collaboration withWAHAC.

LIP

The FaFT family leader has organised services for parents and staff, including: parenting courses; hearing, trachoma, nutrition lessons; and cooking healthy meals for children.

LIP

The Locally Supported Playgroup is operational with three Indigenous playgroup leaders currently employed and supported by a qualified teacher (family educator) and a family liaison officer.

LIP

An Aboriginal Child health worker, as well as other Health Development staff, has been supporting young mums through various programmes.

LIP

Professional development provided for midwives and other antenatal care providers to support women to stop smoking during pregnancy.

LIP

Remote Area Midwife provides the one to one education with antenatals during their check-ups The Maternal & Child Health Nurse and the Aboriginal Health Practitioners undertake education sessions at the school fortnightly.

LIP

Health

 

Transport to Alice Springs to support attendance at specialist appointments is now provided by the Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation.

LIP,
CtG IHO NPA

A water supply was installed at the Ntaria cultural area in late 2010 with a grant from the IRSD South Australia.

LIP, IRSD SA

Construction completed of housing for dialysis staff.

 

Implementation of the Waste Management Program commenced in June 2011.

LIP

Construction of three additional staff houses were completed in July 2011 and there are now a total of 10 residences for staff of the Clinic and WAHAC.

LIP

A comprehensive review of Aged Care and Disability services to inform service and facility development was completed in June 2011.

LIP

Primary health care services through the Ntaria Community Health Centre and WAHAC.

 

Licensing of two community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

WAHAC provides efficient health services management and is well supported by its Local Board.

 

The Indigenous Sport Unit with the MacDonnell Shire Council and the LRG developed a report reviewing sports and recreational facilities in Ntaria, including priorities for upgrades and options for developing and improving sports and recreation in the community.

LIP

Increased adult and child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5'sKidsprogramme.

 

A report on youth engagement and participation in recreational and educational activities was submitted to the Office of Children and Families on 8th October 2012 after being accepted by the Local Reference Group on 22 March 2012.

LIP

Ninti One has completed a report on 'Ntaria Tobacco Use Production Project'. The report was presented to the Wurla Nyinta Local Reference Group (LRG) on the 4th June, 2013 for information & comment.

LIP

Construction of a new Health Clinic in Ntaria has commenced, with an expected completion date of April 2014.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Women’s safe house and men’s well-being facilities completed in 2010.

LIP

The Men’s Centre hosts weekly discussions and gatherings on health and community issues.

 

Two Remote Aboriginal Family Care Workers are now working in the community.

CtG NT NPA, SFNT

A new emergency service facility opened in late 2010 and an 8 person volunteer unit has been established.

LIP

Traffic speed restrictors and other traffic calming measures have been installed.

LIP

Nineteen (19) new street lights have been installed.

LIP

A 12 year lease was endorsed by the Central Land Council Executive Council for the Ntaria Multi-purpose Youth Facility. Aboriginal Benefits Account (ABA) approved $1M to reseal and cover the basketball courts. IRSD SA funding of $3.5M approved for construction and establishment of the facility. Initial site works commenced October 2013.

LIP, IRSD SA

Community night patrol so people feel safe in the community.

 

The Local Counter Disaster Plan has been developed, with reviews undertaken as required.

LIP

An Alcohol and Other Drugs worker has been operating in Ntaria since May 2012 and has successfully operated meetings/gatherings at the Men’s Centre on a weekly basis to provide alcohol and other drug counselling services.

LIP

Road safety awareness was delivered in Ntaria in April 2013 and September 2013 by the Road Safety Team of the Department of Transport.

LIP

Stronger Communities for Children, Neighbourhood Watch, and a Alcohol Management Plan are being implemented.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Ntaria community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meet regularly.

 

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in September 2013. As at December 2013, ten people had gained a learner licence and two people had gained a provisional licence.

 

Economic Participation

 

A work safely in construction programme commenced in preparation for works under NPARIH, providing white card training and grader operations training.

 

A town centre urban design plan, including community transport strategies has been completed.

LIP

Community members completed Cert II in construction recognised in a formal presentation in July 2013.

LIP

A NT Parks Ranger is mentoring 16.8 Full-time Employees (FTE) of Tjuwanpa Rangers to develop park management skills with 12 FTE contracted to the Central Land Council and a women’s group with 4.8 FTE’s contracted to Tjuwanpa Outstation Resource Centre Aboriginal Corporation (TORAC).

LIP

The Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access Project has delivered free internet training through the school.

RIPIA NPA

Under the NT Government’s Remote Bus Program, a commercial passenger bus service to Alice Springs commencedin 2011.

 

The Ntaria Business and Economic Opportunities profile detailing current positions and jobs was published inApril2011.

LIP

A futures forum was held on 19 and 26 May 2011 providing advice and information on employment and training.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

The Ntaria area plan and zoning map was gazetted December 2011. Internal streets named in October 2010.

LIP

Existing developments have been surveyed and a subdivision application to create lots has been approved.

 

Completed a detailed road survey and prepared a funding submission to upgrade roads.

LIP

An identified industries and major projects Workforce Plan is under development and trialling in Ntaria began in 2013 to determine suitability and potential rollout to other towns.

 

As part of the NPARIH housing programme, 15 community members completed their 1 year pathway training with New Futures Alliance (NFA). 4 community members are continuing their training with NFA at Yuendumu and another 4 have secured full time employment in Ntaria.

 

Between 4th February – 29th March 2013 Certificate I & II in Asset Maintenance (Cleaning Operations) was carried out. During 15th April – 10th May 2013 Certificate I in Work Readiness and Certificate II in Workplace Practices wasdelivered.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

The Wurla Nyinta LRG is established. Interpreters are used for most meetings.

LIP

A Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) is being developed with government and service provider employees to build respect and understanding of local culture with three successful LCAP programmes delivered in Ntaria in November 2011 and June 2012, and introductory sessions delivered to Ntaria School staff at the commencement of 2013 school year.

LIP

A community research team comprising Indigenous researchers has been established and is providing input to LRG on local issues.

 

Provision of a professional development programme for elected Shire Members.

LIP

Australian Interpreter Services (AIS) completed 'Induction Program' in August 2012 for community members to be interpreters. This will meet needs to address shortfall of available interpreters for the community.

LIP

Ninti One have completed their report on ‘Two-Way Governance’ and presented at the Wurla Nyinta LRG meeting on the 4th of June 2013 for information and comment.

LIP

 

Numbulwar

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Construction of new homes and refurbishments under NPARIH commenced in July 2012 and as at 30 June 2013 65 new houses and 53 housing refurbishments have been completed.

LIP, NPARIH

The NT and Australian governments have established ongoing consultation with the Housing Reference Group and Traditional Owners on housing issues.

NPARIH

Information sessions provided regarding clean drinking water.

LIP

Numbulwar wastewater system capacity assessment has been completed for treatment and disposal elements. Initial concept design work has been completed for the treatment ponds and disposal. Numbulwar wastewater system planning work is incorporated into Power & Water's Remote Operations Wastewater Management Strategy.

LIP

Water and energy saving messages have been broadcast via radio and local print media. These have been linked to raising general awareness about conserving power and water.

LIP

Funding was provided for replacement of rusted power poles.

IRSD SA

Schooling

 

A School Nutrition Program provides up to 450 meals a day, which has led to reported reductions in the anaemiaratein children.

CtG NT NPA, SFNT

A school attendance plan has been developed for Numbulwar and is supported by the NT Government’s EveryChildEvery Day Strategy.

LIP

The school has three Home Liaison Officers who are supporting local school attendance initiatives.

LIP

Numbulwar School has had a new multi-purpose hall and outdoor play area.

BER

A school bus is provided to get the children to school.

 

Refurbishments to school facilities have occurred to support the FaFT‑IPSS Program.

LIP

The Vocational Education and Training in Schools Masterplan is completed and is updated each year.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for a trade training facility was approved for Numbulwar School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are community services and horticulture.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parent Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) programme was established and is delivering services including mobile playgroups, parent workshops and the delivery of books to homes.

 

One Indigenous Family Liaison Officer has a Certificate III in Community Service

LIP

Mapping of current infrastructure in conjunction with community taking place.

LIP

A FaFT family educator was recruited in October 2012 and permanently contracted from Term 1 of 2013.

LIP

A group of parents in the community are regularly going to play group with their children.

LIP

FaFT‑IPSS deliver parents education programmes developing knowledge and skills to support the healthy development of their children.

 

Service providers continue to work with the community to integrate services for families. The school is a community hub housing the playgroup, FAST programme and FaFT. Early learning and parenting support outreach services are provided to the broader community.

LIP

The FaFT Family Educator and Family Liaison Officers are providing an integrated services model in the school ground for families and their children. They also collaborate and support the delivery of locational supported playgroup funded through Anglicare.

LIP

Nutrition is on the school curriculum for 2013 in the FaFT programme which shares facilities with the Play Group activity. Young mothers attending Play Group and FaFT undertake courses in family nutrition, supported by the Playgroup coordinator/assistants and the FaFT Support Teacher. The FaFT programme is developing a health and hygiene workshop in collaboration with the Numbulwar clinic to support mothers in childcare.

LIP

Health

 

An additional vehicle was provided to assist with health outreach services in the first quarter of 2011.

LIP

Several tobacco control initiatives have been implemented including: employment of tobacco community worker, educational and promotional activities with multiple groups, training for clinic staff and community workers regarding tobacco cessation and brief intervention, community promotional activities about Nicotine Replacement Therapy and quit support. The Alcohol and Other Drugs Program will continue to offer in-services and workshops tobuildongoingcapacity.

LIP

Anti-smoking initiatives are ongoing in Numbulwar, including the clinic’s home visit programme.

LIP

Education sessions have been held at the school, the women's centre and the Shire offices to raise awareness of tobacco harms and smoke free policies.

LIP

Increased adult and child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5'sKidsprogramme.

LIP

A dentist visits Numbulwar at least four times a year.

 

The NT Government is constructing a new Primary Health Care Centre.

LIP

Held information sessions on the water quality in Numbulwar.

LIP

Developed a local primary health care plan.

LIP

Reviewed aged care services.

LIP

Education sessions regarding risk behaviours and harm minimisation are held in the school and are attended by all ages and genders.

LIP

Public health staff are working with key community groups such as FaFT, Senior Teachers and Teacher Aids to implement healthy lifestyle initiatives such as healthy eating and exercise programmes, diabetes and heart health, hygiene and housekeeping.

LIP

Two licensed community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

Local Aboriginal Health Practitioners have been trained to use the Eat Better Move More training kit and are implementing it within the community with assistance from the Public Health Nurse.

LIP

Regional Aboriginal Men's Health Promotion Officer has made regular visits to Numbulwar to assist with men'shealthissues.

LIP

Aboriginal Health Practitioners working with community groups to encourage regular health checks. A breast screening week was held in June 2013 and further health screening days/weeks are planned for late 2013.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

The NT Police, Fire and Emergency Services and Roper Gulf Shire Council have developed a cyclone response plan.

LIP

Numbulwar is covered by the Ngukurr Emergency Response Plan, which has been reviewed and is current until 1November2013.

LIP

The police and volunteer emergency response team has been trained in road accident rescue. Equipment to conduct storm damage and land search operations has been supplied.

LIP

Traffic calming devices have been installed in the community.

LIP

The Remote Aboriginal Family and Community Program (RAFCP) is operational and is providing family support.

 

A Community Transport Planning Workshop has been held to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

A boat to access the coastal outstations has been allocated to Numbulwar Homelands Council Assoc. Inc.

 

Police facilities have been provided at Numbulwar which support an ongoing police presence within the community.

 

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in June 2012. As at December 2013, 26 people had gained a learner licence but no people had gained a provisional licence.

LIP

Road accident, rescue, storm damage management and land search capability is provided by police and volunteers. Land search equipment, fire trailer and a chainsaw have been provided and police and volunteers were trained to use the equipment. Increased activity in volunteer recruitment and retention continued throughout 2013.

LIP

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Numbulwar community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meet regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

A grader was funded for Roper Gulf Shire Council to upgrade the roads in and around Numbulwar.

LIP, IRSD SA

Under the NT Government’s Remote Bus Program, a commercial passenger bus service connecting Numbulwar to Ngukurr and Katherine commenced in 2011.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in July 2011 to inform future transport service delivery.

LIP

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstations.

LIP

Money Management Services and Commonwealth Financial Counselling Services are being provided as an ongoing service until June 2014.

LIP

Support for Numbulwar Numburindi Ama-Lhagaya-Yinyung Rangers under the Working on Country Program.

 

New channel markers have been installed in the Rose River.

LIP

Public exhibition of the Area Plan and Zoning Map was from 13 March 2013 to 12 April 2013. The Numbulwar Area Plan and zoning map was included in the NT Planning Scheme on 22 May 2013.

LIP

Commitment to leasing land from Traditional Owners where the Government and private sector has infrastructure.

 

Produced baseline mapping of regional services, infrastructure and socio-economic data.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

Two Governance and Leadership workshops have been held for the Local Reference Group (LRG), Community Leaders and future leaders.

LIP

Roper Gulf Shire Council and the Australian Government have delivered leadership skills training to council members.

LIP

A Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) was held in June 2012. It covered local language, kinship and social systems, cultural protocols, and areas of cultural significance.

 

The LRG is established and has an integrated meeting schedule with other local consultative bodies. This has made community consultation more streamlined and less onerous on the membership of the consultative groups.

 

Councillors from Roper Gulf Shire Council (RGSC) are currently undertaking extensive governance training to complete Cert III Business Administration; computer use is part of this training.

LIP

 

Umbakumba

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Eighteen (18) new houses and 42 refurbishments and rebuilds were completed at the end of 2012.

NPARIH, LIP

Commonwealth Financial Counselling is provided by Anglicare. Money Management Services are being delivered by Australian Red Cross.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

Provided tenancy support to assist new tenants in maintaining their homes e.g. budgeting, home care and life skills.

LIP

As at December 2012 there were a total of 60 Tenancy Agreements in place for new and refurbished dwellings – Tenancy Agreements are an essential part of the property management reforms that will sustain the government’s investment in houses in remote communities for the long-term.

LIP

Schooling

 

The construction of eight new houses for teachers was completed in June 2011.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

An Education and Training Board has been established to work on improving education and training on Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island.

 

Umbakumba primary school received new classrooms and building refurbishments (including green upgrades) under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA, BER

Funding for construction of three staff houses was approved and construction has been completed, with negotiations underway between the NT Department of Housing and GEBIE to construct 14 houses in Angurugu for government employees, including four for teaching staff.

LIP

The Ngakwurralangwa College was established in response to a review of education needs in the Anindilyakwa region, and encompasses all schools on the Groote archipelago.

 

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

LIP

The School Enrolment and Attendance Measure (SEAM), as a component of SFNT, commenced in all four schools of the Ngakwurralangwa College in early 2013.

SFNT

A Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project to support parents and community in school governance, and another PaCE project involving parents and community producing, recording and sharing cultural stories withtheirchildren.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Umbakumba School has received funding as a partner in the Anindilyakwa Trade Training Centre, to deliver qualifications in construction, hospitality and resources and infrastructure. The facility at the Umbakumba site was completed in August 2013. It has been built to cyclone shelter standards and will be the community cyclone shelter.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA, TTC

Early Childhood

 

An Early Childhood Coordinator (known as the Child and Family Leader) has been established to lead the coordination of family services and facilitate community consultation.

LIP

Construction of a purpose built-childcare centre is complete and the centre is now operational.

LIP

Communities for Children playgroup services continue to be delivered.

LIP

The Australian Literacy and Numeracy Foundation delivered workshops that teach foundational pre-literacy and language to support early learning.

 

Health

 

Funding was approved under the IRSD SA for the Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD) Foundation to engage with families affected by MJD and a women’s camp on Groote Eylandt.

LIP, IRSD SA

Recruited a MJD coordinator in April 2010.

LIP

IRSD SA funding has been approved to allow the Angurugu Aged Care and Disability Service to purchase three sets of palliative care equipment for in-home use across Groote Eylandt.

LIP, IRSD SA

Upgraded ambulance services include new ambulance vehicles and at least one paramedic per shift.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

An aircraft wheelchair lift has been provided for Groote Eylandt airport and Vincent Aviation terminal in Darwin to assist people with MJD and other mobility impairments.

LIP

The fluoridation treatment plant is now complete and was commissioned on 5 August 2013. Fluoridated water is being provided to the community and the Department of Health will deliver an oral health education programme toaugmentthe project.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Groote Telecommunications 3G mobile phone service evaluation.

LIP, IRSD SA

A new office and facility for the NT Police was completed in June 2009. Police maintain a regular police presence within the community, including overnight stays.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

The Umbakumba community safety plan was endorsed by the Local Reference Group in April 2013.

LIP

Established a Groote Eylandt Community Tasking and Coordination Group.

LIP

A Community Engagement Police Officer has been appointed and works across Angurugu and Umbakumba.

 

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in April 2012. As at December 2013, 154 people had gained a learner licence and 95 people had gained a provisional licence in Angurugu andUmbakumba.

LIP

A Remote Aboriginal Family Community Worker has been appointed and provides family support services tothecommunity.

 

Continued targeting of drug activity on and destined for Groote Eylandt, including through regular snifferdogscreening.

LIP

A substance misuse summit is scheduled to take place on Groote Eylandt in early 2014. A comprehensive strategy and action plan will be completed as part of this process.

LIP, IRSD SA

Education on dog management has been delivered in Umbakumba.

IRSD SA

A trade training centre was completed in August 2013. The centre has been built to cyclone shelter standards and will function as the community cyclone shelter.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

Economic Participation

 

Provided three year funding for an Economic Development Officer to deliver business projects.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

A threatened species education and research centre has been built and has been operational since May 2012. The centre employs 15 local Indigenous people and operates as the base for the Anindilyakwa Land and Sea Rangers.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

A jobs market profile detailing current positions and jobs was published in 2011.

LIP

Increased Indigenous training and employment programmes.

LIP

$2.4 million has been committed under the RPA for mining trade training and mentoring.

Groote Eylandt RPA

The area plan and zoning map was gazetted in August 2010.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in August 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

The road from Angurugu to Umbakumba has been sealed. The work provided training and employment for at least 20 local people and is an enormous boon for the community in terms of travel time, road safety, community safety and economic development. A new locally-owned quarry provided materials for the project.

LIP

Assessment and determination of costs for a 3G Mobile Phone service at Umbakumba.

LIP

Sprinkler rehabilitation at sewage ponds completed.

IRSD SA

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstations.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

A Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Governance Development Plan for the Anindilyakwa Land Council (ALC) and GEBIE is complete and is being implemented.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

Members of the Umbakumba Local Reference Group (LRG) participated in three facilitated Governance Training Workshops between August and October 2012.

LIP

Commitment to leasing land from Traditional Owners where government and private sectors have infrastructure.

LIP

The Government Engagement Coordinator and Indigenous Engagement Officer work with the ALC, LRGs and community consultative bodies to coordinate community consultation and decision making.

LIP

Planning and Infrastructure

 

The town plan was gazetted in August 2010.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

Sealing of the Umbakumba road was finished in August 2012.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

Youth Sport & Recreation

 

An oval upgrade is complete.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

The AFL junior interschool competition and Auskick programme are established and ongoing.

LIP, Groote Elyandt RPA

A Youth Mentor has been engaged by East Arnhem Shire Council (EASC) and has commenced work inthecommunity.

 

The One People, One Voice festival was held in Angurugu in 2013 and will be held in Umbakumba in 2014.

 

A vehicle was provided to the community to transport AFL players to inter-school football matches on Groote Eylandt.

LIP

The Youth Steering Committee has been established and has oversight of the Youth Strategy, which was endorsed at the Groote RPA Committee Meeting in December 2011 The Committee works to engage with youth and seek their input to a Youth Action Plan, and a Youth Services Team Leader and Mentor being appointed (November 2012) to focus on implementation of the actions in the Youth Strategy and better coordinate youth services and fundinginthecommunities.

LIP, Groote Eylandt RPA

The AFL club rooms were opened/commissioned in January 2013.

LIP

A Youth Services Team Leader and Mentor were appointed in November 2012 to focus on implementation of the actions in the Youth Strategy and better coordinate youth services and funding in the communities.

LIP

 

Wadeye

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

One hundred and five new houses and 117 refurbishments and rebuilds completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Service level agreements between the NT Government and Victoria Daly Shire Council (VDSC) are in place to fund small repairs on homes around Wadeye.

LIP

The Thamarrurr Regional Authority Aboriginal Corporation (TRAAC) Board, which also acts as the Housing Reference Group (HRG) liaises with the Traditional Owners on housing needs.

LIP

Gazettal of the area plan and zoning map on 29 May 2013.

LIP

Remote Housing NT has completed a review of the Census occupancy data against the Tenancy Management Data and is working with Regional Housing Teams to determine current needs against demographic profiles.

LIP

As at 31 December 2012 there were a total of 222 Tenancy Agreements in Place – Tenancy Agreements are an essential part of the property management reforms that will sustain the government’s investment in houses in remote communities for the long-term.

 

Schooling

 

IRSD SA funds approved for replacement of four primary school classrooms at Wadeye Catholic School.

IRSD SA

One Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Construction of the new Wadeye boarding facility is completed and was opened in September 2012. The facility accommodates 40 students and many staff members will also live on site.

LIP

Under the Building the Education Revolution program Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr School received a new outdoor learning centre, library, science centre and refurbishment of the multipurpose hall.

BER

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic College received funding for the OLSH Thamarrurr Mechanical, Technical and Hospitality Trade Training Centre to deliver horticulture, automotive, construction, engineering and hospitality qualifications.

TTC

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

 

Indigenous Ranger Cadetship activities commenced at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic College.

 

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Early Childhood

 

The Families as First Teachers Indigenous Parenting Support Service (FaFT‑IPSS) has been establishedatWadeye.

 

The new Children’s Service Centre was completed May 2010.

LIP

Housing for staff working at the Children and Family Centre was also completed in May 2010.

 

An Intensive Supported Playgroup is operational in the community.

LIP

A Family Educator and Family Liaison Officer commenced in January 2013.

LIP

Health

 

IRSD SA funds approved to support health, schooling and training engagement through the WadeyeMagicfootballteam project.

IRSD SA

A new clinic was completed in November 2010. Regular visiting specialists include paediatricians, obstetricians, hearing &eye team, endocrinology, respiratory specialist, adult and paediatric dentists and a cardiologist.

 

A four-bedroom house near the Aged Care Centre being used by elderly men to live in.

 

A volunteer dentist from Tooth Mob visits Wadeye for 2 weeks per month.

 

A new wheelchair accessible bus has been provided to the Aged Care Centre.

 

Licensing of four community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

A review of the aged care and disability services has been undertaken.

LIP

Thamarrurr leaders have been working to get the anti-smoking message out to the community.

LIP

Increased child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into Healthy Under 5's Kids programme.

LIP

Ongoing collaboration between local and outreach services to more effectively deliver health services. Women'shealth week resulted in 180 women accessing mammography screening.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Speed limits have been agreed and the Shire is progressing with signs.

LIP

Job Futures have a dual control driver training vehicle and are assisting community members to obtain licenses.

 

Two Remote Aboriginal Family Care Workers have been appointed to provide child protection and related services.

 

IRSD SA funding was provided for a fit-out of the Youth Drop-in Centre. The fit-out was completed in 2012 and the centre is now operating.

LIP, IRSD SA

Purchase of a four wheel drive vehicle for the Community Liaison Officer with the Wadeye Police.

IRSD SA

A women’s safe house is operational and is being managed by a non-government organisation service provider.

 

Police in Wadeye are trained to handle Road Accident, Rescue and Basic Grass Fire Services.

LIP

A Community Transport Planning Workshop was held to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

Wadeye is now better prepared for an emergency or natural disaster.

LIP

Wadeye has a number of cyclone shelters including the shops, school and police station.

LIP

Community night patrol is operating in the community.

 

The Wadeye sport and recreational services team continue to deliver youth focussed programmes in partnership with the school. The Indigenous Sport Unit in partnership with the Victoria Daly Shire Council are developing coresportingcompetitions.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in March 2013. As at December 2013, 134 people had gained a learner licence and 32 people had gained a provisional licence.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Wadeye community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meet regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

A Town Centre Urban Design Plan including community transport strategies was completed in May 2011.

LIP

An agreement has been reached with Traditional Owners allowing the new Wadeye South housing subdivision for service provider and government staff to be built – site works commenced in May 2012.

 

The Tom Turner Creek Crossing was opened November 2011, with additional sealing works completed in June 2012.

LIP

Construction of the High level bridge over the Daly River was completed in November 2012, with the Official opening ceremony held on 14 December 2012.

LIP

Indigenous Business Australia (IBA) will be delivering Indigenous Communities in Business workshops in Wadeye, one of two NT communities chosen to trial this programme.

 

Working closely with Thamarrurr Development Corporation (TDC) and Victoria Daly Shire Council to implement relevant economic development initiatives.

LIP

Increased Indigenous training and employment programmes.

LIP

Developed Job profile detailing current positions and jobs.

 

The NT and Australian governments now have rules in place so Indigenous businesses have more chance of being given a government contract.

 

Support for Thamarrurr Rangers through the Working on Country programme.

 

An Economic Development Team (EDT) has been established to coordinate implementation of Economic Participation action items, including in homelands.

LIP

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstations.

 

Gazetted an area plan, zoning map and town’s internal roads, including naming the roads.

LIP

Increased economic opportunities and job creations through NPA on Indigenous Economic Participation (NPA IEP) and RJCP.

LIP, NPA IEP

A new Homelands policy has been released along with programme guidelines which provide improved asset management initiatives.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

Purchase of a musical instruments and amplification equipment for the Wadeye Festival.

IRSD SA

TRAAC was established prior to the LIP process and acts as the main community consultative body.

 

Work is progressing on the Youth Strategy and development of a Youth Council.

LIP

A Youth Engagement Coordinator and a Social and Emotional Well-being Manager have been employed to operate the Youth Drop-in Centre.

LIP

Assistance for youth will also be provided from other services in the community under the Youth Strategy.

LIP

Commitment to leasing land from Traditional Owners where the NT Government has infrastructure.

LIP

TRAAC is developing a strategic plan and business plan that will help build leadership skills of the board members.

 

 

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Ninety new houses and 160 refurbishments and rebuilds completed as at 30 June 2013.

NPARIH

Fifteen loans have been approved for Wurrumiyanga people to buy and own their own homes, 14 have been settled.

HOIL

Intensive Tenancy Support is offered to remote public housing tenants entering into a formal Tenancy Agreement and as at 31 December 2012 there were a total of 226 Tenancy Agreements in place – Tenancy Agreements are an essential part of the property management reforms that will sustain the government’s investment in houses in remote communities for the long-term.

LIP

Remote Housing NT (RHNT) has completed a review of the census occupancy data against the Tenancy management data and is working with the Regional Housing teams to determine current needs against demographic profiles. Under the NPARIH and SFNT programme, RHNT will undertake periodic review to determine whether a case exists for additional housing within the budget constraints of the Capital Works Program.

LIP

Schooling

 

Refurbishment of the Wurrumiyanga after-school youth drop in centre.

IRSD SA

IRSD SA funding was provided for the preservation of Tiwi Islands Historical Cultural Collections and Archives.

IRSD SA

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme, Murrupurtiyanuwu Primary School’s library upgrade and new multi-purpose hall were completed in June 2011 and April 2012 respectively.

BER

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Xavier Community Education Centre received funding for the Xavier Community Education Centre Trade Training Centre to deliver agriculture, construction, hospitality, manufacturing and engineering qualifications.

TTC

The Xavier Secondary College library is equipped with computers and provides library services to students duringschool hours.

 

Xavier Secondary School now delivers a Year 12 programme as part of its curriculum.

LIP

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

 

School Nutrition Program, providing breakfast and lunch to children at school.

SFNT

Early Childhood

 

A Family Educator and a Family Liaison Officer are now working in the community to support earlychildhoodeducation.

 

The Family Liaison Officer has achieved a Certificate lll in Community Services.

LIP

The NT Government has introduced the Families and First Teachers programme.

 

The Australian Government and Tiwi Islands Shire Council (TISC) upgraded the child care centre’s facilities and equipment in October 2011.

 

As of November 2011 the child care centre meets the requirements of the National Quality Standards for EarlyChildhood Education and Care (NQSECEC).

 

The Let’s Start Program is being delivered as an outreach service for community. Two employees are employed to deliver this programme.

LIP

Mapping has been completed for Early Childhood services and infrastructure available to deliver services. Integratedservice delivery has commenced and capital works completed.

LIP

Health

 

Three Tiwi people have commenced traineeships in Aboriginal Health Work.

LIP

Local employment in the Aged care facility covers up to 40% of staff positions.

LIP

Around 100 patients were treated between April and June 2012 under the Oral Health Program.

 

Additional staff accommodation for the aged care centre was built, and opened in September 2010.

LIP

A new fluoridation plant and water storage facilities have been installed and were officially opened July 2012.

LIP

Increased adult and child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5’sKidsprogramme.

LIP

Primary health care services through the Julanimawu Health Centre.

 

Dentists and child oral health workers visit Wurrumiyanga every month.

 

Fluoride varnish training commenced.

 

Presented hand washing hygiene programme to the primary school.

LIP

The Department of Sport and Recreation have developed a report on the current status of Sport and Recreation facilities, including priorities for upgrades.

LIP

A report has been finalised and presented regarding the development of a more streamlined, simpler and integrated approach to sport and recreation activities, including an assessment of available infrastructure. TISC and the Indigenous Sport Unit are working in partnership with the peak sporting orgs around implementing the core Sport Framework. The sports are softball, cricket and AFL for women and juniors.

LIP

Aged care services including a 16 bed residential unit and meals on wheels.

 

In late 2010 local employee commenced Indigenous Traineeship: Certificate II in Business Studies at the agedcarecentre.

 

Clinic reports that stop smoking awareness and education programmes are part of their on-going current business and that nicotine abatement products are readily available by prescription from local GP through the clinic pharmacy with support programmes available.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Emergency Service capabilities that now exist are Marine Search and Rescue, Fire and Storm Damage and road crash rescue.

LIP

Two Remote Aboriginal Family and Community Workers work in the community and provide family support services.

LIP

Community consultations are underway to establish an Alcohol Management Plan across the Tiwi Islands.

LIP

There is a Community Child Safety and Wellbeing Team Practitioner who resides and works in Wurrumiyanga.

 

A women’s safe place is operational.

LIP

The NT Emergency Service has a plan in place to help the community when a cyclone or natural disaster hitsthecommunity.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in April 2012. As at December 2013, 149 people had gained a learner licence and 74 people had gained a provisional licence.

 

Held a Community Transport Planning Workshop to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

IRSD SA funding provided in 2012-13 for the refurbishment of the Youth after school drop in centre.

IRSD SA

Education on dog management has been delivered.in Wurrumiyanga.

IRSD SA

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Wurrumiyanga community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meet regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

A profile of economic and business opportunities has been published by the NT Government. This will help people who are interested in starting a business in Wurrumiyanga.

LIP

The area plan and zoning map were gazetted in January 2012.

LIP

Indigenous Business Australia (IBA) is running Indigenous in Small Business workshops in the community.

 

43 apprentices were in training during the April/June quarter 2012.

 

The power station received an upgrade to increase generation capacity and fuel storage during the firstquarterof2012.

 

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstations.

 

A mini bus to transport trainees and apprentices to training at Wurrumiyanga.

 

Developed Jobs profile detailing current positions and jobs.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in July 2011 to inform future transport services.

LIP

A Futures Forum was held in Wurrumiyanga in November 2011 that gave people the chance to find out more about jobs, training and education.

LIP

Job Services Australia has made 18 permanent employment placements within the quarter July/Sept 2012, and 12 permanent placements in the Oct/Dec 2012 quarter.

LIP

Increased Indigenous training and employment programmes.

 

Two vandal and weather proof notice boards have been installed in key locations in the community to improve information dissemination across the community including advertising employment and training opportunities.

IRSD SA

Governance & Leadership

 

The Local Reference Group is established and is supported by the Government Engagement Coordinator and Indigenous Engagement Officer to work on actions in the Local Implementation Plan.

LIP

A pilot Local Community Awareness Program (LCAP) was developed in November 2011. An additional LCAP was delivered in May 2013.

LIP

Funded the Tiwi Islands Shire for Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service (RIBS) at Wurrumiyanga, Pirlangimpi and Milikapiti and for supervision of RIBS operators.

LIP

Earth moving equipment for Tiwi Island Shire Council.

 

 

Yirrkala

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

Planning for the Yirrkala capital works package has commenced with 2 refurbishments completed to 30 June 2013.

 

Interim housing leases for Yirrkala have been granted with construction planned for 2013–14.

LIP

The Housing Reference Group has been meeting through the Gurrutu'mirri Mala Local Reference Group for several months. NPARIH contractors and the NT Department of Construction and Infrastructure Project Manager have advised both, on refurbishments and the pressures on contractors that affect sustainable employment opportunities inthe industry.

LIP

NPARIH refurbishments continue (47 of 62 upgrade tenders have been awarded). Work on the first six replacement houses continues with Yolngu personnel from Yirrkala. Housing refurbishments have commenced under NPARIH – upgrade works for the first parcel of 22 of 62 upgrades commenced on 6 June 2013 with 2 completed by 30June2013.

NPARIH

CDEP participants have undertaken Certificate 1 in Construction and participants are ready to be placed withemployers.

 

Schooling

 

After school activities in the school are established and ongoing.

LIP

A Truancy & Support Worker is working to support school attendance and children with special needs.

LIP

A Futures Forum was held in Yirrkala on 30 March 2012 to promote work, training and education opportunities.

LIP

Funds were directed to the Yirrkala Buku Larrnggay Mulka Centre Art Centre and works completed in February/March2013.

LIP

The Parent and Community Engagement Program (PaCE) “Literacy and Numeracy in the Home for Parents” was delivered which included production of a set of resources for parents of indigenous students aged 5-11 in Yirrkala anda number of other communities.

LIP

The trade training area at the school has received a $130,000 upgrade.

LIP, TTC

The Yirrkala School holds an annual careers day for senior students so they can learn about job opportunities and education after school.

LIP

Trained and supported local people into accredited teacher, teacher’s aide and senior teacher positions.

LIP

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

 

A Clontarf academy was established in the first quarter of 2011 through the Yirrkala School.

 

The Sporting Chance Program uses sport and recreation to engage Indigenous students in their schooling. Delivered by the Clontarf Foundation the project commenced in 2011 with 30 Indigenous boys participating in the programmein2012.

 

A Young Woman’s Program linked to school attendance is being delivered in partnership between East Arnhem Shire Youth Services Team, the Remote Aboriginal Family and Community Worker and Yirrkala School.

 

The Learning on Country Program (LoCP) commenced at Yirrkala School.

LIP

Yirrkala School attendance continues to improve on the already increased numbers of 2012 as school continues to develop and promote parental/carer engagement with school and re-engagement programmes with disengaged children and youth.

 

There is a strong and active school council of Yolngu members.

 

Under the Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme, the Yirrkala Homeland Centre received a building refurbishment, an early learning centre and four homelands multi-purpose education centres.

BER

Under the BER programme, the Yirrkala School received upgrades to school buildings and sporting facilities and an early learning centre with outdoor connections.

BER

There is one PaCE project to increase parental participation in the school and support parents to ensure their children go to school.

 

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), Yirrkala School has received funding as a partner in the East Arnhem Trade Training Centre, to deliver qualifications in community services, horticulture, construction andengineering.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

Family Educator and Indigenous Family Liaison Officer are providing services including dual generational playgroups, parent workshops, home visiting, books in homes and transition to preschool.

 

The Miwatj Health Strong Fathers Strong Families Program promotes positive parenting and school attendance.

LIP

An early childhood crèche is operating in the community.

 

Yolngu Family Liaison Officers are supported to obtain a Certificate III in Community Services.

LIP

Yolngu women are receiving better advice about staying healthy before and after they have children and are participating in nutrition programmes at playgroups.

LIP

Further capital works for early childhood infrastructure have been identified and scoped as per QuantitySurveyorreport.

LIP

Established a maternal health programme inclusive of parenting information, birthing and post natal care.

LIP

Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture worker is employed through Miwatj Health.

 

The Yirrkala Annual Baby Show is held to celebrate and promote the importance of early years of life.

 

Health

 

Machado Joseph Disease Foundation (MJD) funding was approved under the IRSD SA for the MJD Foundation to engage with families affected by MJD in Yirrkala.

IRSD SA

Provided a Surf Life Saving Program.

IRSD SA

IRSD SA funding approved for 2012–13 for resurface and upgrade to the Yirrkala basketball courts. Work is due for completion by December 2013.

IRSD SA

IRSD SA funding for 2012–13 for refurbishment of the Bulpul facility kitchen to support FaFT’s delivery of comprehensive nutrition workshops. Works have commenced and are due for completion by end September 2013.

IRSD SA

IRSD SA funding for 2012–13 for the upgrade and repair of the Yirrkala oval lights. Works commenced and due for completion by October 2013.

IRSD SA

Established regular support and provision of health education.

 

Anti-smoking initiatives including the Miwatj Health Yaka Ngarli project and the declaration of smoke-free zones are being implemented.

 

Yirrkala Clinic has been staffed with a permanent doctor since 1 July 2012.

 

Healthy eating and lifestyle programmes are being delivered to the community.

 

Miwatj Health has visiting specialists that visit the Yirrkala Clinic including paediatrician, cardiologist, podiatrist, dermatologist, dietician, gynaecology, respiratory.

LIP

Miwatj Health provides a bus assist programme to transport community members to attend appointments.

LIP

The Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) conducted a service review to inform further aged care and disability service and facility development and as a result:

  • An additional community aged care place was allocated to Yirrkala to expand services available
  • High care places including high care dementia specific places will be available for Yirrkala as needed
  • There is a workforce development training programme for East Arnhem Shire Council aged care services targeted at records recoding and management.

LIP

The Indigenous Sport Unit developed a report on developing a simpler and streamlined approach to sport and recreation services, including an assessment of existing infrastructure. This was provided to the Arnhem InfrastructureCoordination group.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Police ensure regular patrols are conducted within Yirrkala on a daily and nightly basis when on rostered duty, increasing the number of police patrols at night.

LIP

The Remote Aboriginal Family Community Program is operational and providing family support.

LIP

A Community Child Safety and Wellbeing Team practitioner is in community to provide targeted support to children and families.

 

Review of the Volatile Substance Abuse Management Plan undertaken.

LIP

Yirrkala is serviced by the Emergency Response team based in Nhulunbuy. The Local Disaster Management Plan iscurrent.

LIP

A Community Night Patrol is operational under the management of East Arnhem Shire Council.

 

The MOSPlus programme visits Yirrkala every three weeks and delivers trauma counselling and traumaeducationtochildren.

 

Petrol Sniffing Strategy Unit funding provided to Yirrkala School to develop a Youth Cultural Mentors Program.

 

An Animal Management Plan has been finalised and an Animal Control Officer has been employed by East Arnhem Shire Council to help manage dogs and wild animals in the East Arnhem Region.

 

NT Police are now the lead agency for the Community Safety Plan. Consultation on the draft Yirrkala Community Safety Plan is currently underway.

LIP

The DriveSafe NT Remote Driver Education and Licensing Program commenced in April 2012. As at December 2013, 48 people had gained a learner licence and 13 people had gained a provisional licence in the Gove and Yirrkalaarea.

 

Economic Participation

 

Under the NT Government’s Remote Bus Program, a commercial passenger bus service connecting Yirrkala and Gove commenced in 2010 and as at the end of 2013, has serviced approximately 32,000 passengers.

LIP

Transport workshops were held throughout 2010 to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships.

LIP

An economic and investment profile of Yirrkala has been published.

LIP

Increased Indigenous training and employment programmes.

 

Funding support for the Yirrkala Rangers through the Working on Country Program.

 

CDEP participants have completed the refurbishment works required at the shed designated for the pottery kiln.

 

CDEP participants interested in horticulture, landscaping and nursery work attend the Yolngu owned and operated Nuwul Environmental Services, Yirrkala Nursery as their CDEP activity.

 

East Arnhem Shire Council (EASC) has implemented a personal identification system.

LIP

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstation.

 

A Futures Forum was held in Yirrkala to inform local people about local jobs and training.

LIP

There were 193 Job seekers placed into CDEP Activities from 1 April to 30 June 2013, 8 of which were in Yirrkala.

LIP

The General Manager of the RJCP provider, Miwatj Employment and Participation (M.E.P.) attended and briefed the most recent Gurrutu’mirri Mala local reference group meeting. M.E.P is also working with the IEO, GEC and the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Training and Education to link development of a regular Yirrkala Sunset Market with business development and adult literacy and numeracy training.

 

CDEP participants accessed a Certificate I in construction and completed a renovation of the EASC shed to facilitate it housing the pottery kiln. The pottery project is being developed in partnership with EASC, the NT Office of Children and Families and M.E.P.

LIP

M.E.P. is working with the Yolngu owned and operated Nuwul Environmental Services garden centre, Yirrkala Nursery to build a coffee shop in the garden centre. It is anticipated construction of the coffee shop will involve RJCP participants and that pottery produced by RJCP participants will be used and sold through the coffee shop. M.E.P. has an agreement with Yirrkala Nursery for participants interested in horticulture, landscaping and garden centre work to attend the Yirrkala Nursery as their RJCP activity.

 

An ITEC, CEA joint initiative ran training in Yirrkala from 30th July to 24th August 2012, targeting 16 to 25 year old people. The courses are: Cert I. Job Readiness, Cert II. Workplace Practices.

LIP

Naming and gazettal of streets in community.

 

Governance & Leadership

 

The Local Government Association of the Northern Territory recently held comprehensive training for the newly appointed Shire elected members. The East Arnhem Shire Council is providing ongoing leadership training toCouncillors.

LIP

The new Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group (GMRG) has resulted in the delivery of government policies and programmes based on Yolngu self-identified needs, improved community understanding of government policies and programmes and better community and government relations.

LIP

The GMRG Group received support from the Single Government Interface to develop and implement a system through which meetings and consultations are coordinated, streamlined and encourage community input and progress of LIP actions.

LIP

Commitment to leasing land from Traditional Owners where the government and private sectors have infrastructure.

 

A Learning on our Country Program (Junior Rangers Program) has been established and is being operated by Yirrkala School in conjunction with Homelands School, Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation and LaynhapuyHomelandsAboriginal Corporation.

LIP

 

Yuendumu

LIP action NPA, RPA

Healthy Homes

 

A local Housing Reference Group has been established to resolve housing issues in a culturally appropriate way.

 

The Yuendumu Housing Lease was fully executed on 30 May 2013.

 

Planning is underway for the construction and refurbishment of houses in the community, with the NPARIH commencing in the community in June 2013.

NPARIH

The housing lease has been signed by Traditional Owners.

LIP

Remote Housing NT has completed a review of the Census occupancy data against the Tenancy Management Data and it is working with Regional Housing Teams to determine current needs against demographic profiles. Under the NPARIH and the Stronger Futures NT programme RHNT will undertake periodic reviews to determine whether a case exists for additional housing within the budget constraints of the Capital Works Program.

LIP

Schooling

 

School attendance plan is in place and supported by the Every Child Every Day Territory wide strategy.

LIP

SEAM programme is currently being implemented in Yuendumu and is resulting in children who have been absent for extended periods resuming school attendance.

 

There is one Parental and Community Engagement (PaCE) project to involve community, school and services on holistic approach to school attendance and engagement.

LIP

A school nutrition programme has been established and was provided with a new commercial kitchen funded by the NT and Australian Governments.

LIP, CtG NT NPA, SFNT

Six assistant teachers are currently completing bridging courses through Charles Darwin University.

LIP

The Strong Kids Matter program has been established at the school to address bullying.

LIP

An after school 3-9pm programme has been established.

LIP

Development of a dedicated parent room within the Yuendumu School.

IRSD SA

Under the Building the Education Revolution, the Yuendumu school received grounds beautification, preschool refurbishments and a covered outdoor learning area.

BER

Four new teacher houses have been provided to encourage teachers to stay in the community.

 

A Long Day Care and Outside School Hours Care to look after children while parents are at work.

 

Youth in Communities (YIC) programme to help young people to be more connected with school, training and community life.

 

There is a Cultural Advisor working at the school to help teachers understand and respect Warlpiri Culture.

LIP

Under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program (TTC), funding for a trade training facility was approved for Yuendumu School in August 2013. The qualifications proposed for delivery are agriculture and community services.

TTC

Early Childhood

 

A two-bedroom duplex to accommodate staff of the new Indigenous Children and Family Centre was completed in October 2010.

LIP,
IECD NPA

Eight staff have graduated with Certificate II in Childcare Services and an additional four with a Certificate I.

LIP

A Family Educator works in Yuendumu to help with playgroups, to get young kids ready for preschool and get parents involved in their children’s early education.

 

Alcohol and Other Drugs Services Central Australia (ADSCA) funded the Red Dust Role Models to deliver education and support programmes in March 2012.

LIP

Training provided for childcare staff.

LIP

Introduced the Families as First Teachers programme.

 

A midwife is working in the community to help pregnant mothers.

LIP

Preschool of 15 hours per week is provided for children prior to commencing full time school.

LIP

Design and documentation of the Children and Family Centre (CFC) is complete. Extensive consultation undertaken with community .Land tenure issues resolved. Completion expected in late April 2014.

LIP

Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture recommenced early 2013 with two local Indigenous women employed.

LIP

Health

 

Aboriginal health workers continue to work with the school and are supported by specialist Remote Area Nurses asrequired.

LIP

Health staff continue to work with the Yuendumu Old Peoples Program for primary health care and palliative care.

LIP

Mt Theo has been running successful programmes to keep young people away from petrol and other dangeroussubstances.

LIP

The community is working on anti-smoking education and outreach in collaboration with community stakeholders.

LIP

Funding has been allocated to the Sports Demonstration Project and implementation is underway.

LIP

Improved information, communication and technology services, including the installation of fibre optic cable.

LIP

Licensing of two community stores to help ensure fresh food and groceries are available all year round.

 

Increased adult and child dental services. Fluoride varnishing for children integrated into HealthyUnder5'sKidsprogramme.

LIP

Staff are supported to attend training with a wide variety of relevant training in both emergency and population health programmes available.

LIP

The Department of Sport and Recreation provides funding for the ongoing operation of the pool. The Warlpiri Regional Youth Development continues to explore potential funding sources with support from DSR. Operational funding for the pool is currently an issue as royalties money used for this is no longer available. Warlpiri Youth Development Aboriginal Corporation/Mt Theo is pursuing funding opportunities and has initiated a fundraising drive.

LIP

The Indigenous Sport Unit, Central Desert Shire and Warlpiri Youth Development work closely around ensuring that sport and recreation services reflect Community wants. Basketball, Softball and AFL are the sports requested.

LIP

The Indigenous Sport Unit has prepared a report reviewing sports and recreation facilities and infrastructure, includingoptions for further developments.

LIP

Safe Communities

 

Two Remote Aboriginal Family Care Workers appointed to provide child protection and related services.

LIP

Road crash equipment is available, with both police and local volunteers trained in its use.

LIP

Twelve registered volunteers are involved in the local emergency response team.

LIP

Mediation and Justice Committee has been established.

LIP

Funding for additional traffic calming measures and devices has been approved.

LIP

Funding approved for the refurbishment of the women’s safe house to prepare a separate one bedroom residence fora live-in female Domestic Violence Counsellor.

IRSD SA

A women’s safe house is operational and is managed by a non-government organisation service provider.

 

Community night patrol is operating in the community so people can feel safe.

 

A Community Safety Action Plan is established in the Yuendumu community and is managed by the Community Safety Committee who meet regularly.

 

Economic Participation

 

Eleven participants from Yuendumu and Yuelamu are undergoing training in plant and equipment operations.

LIP

Five apprentices were in training in the April/June quarter 2012.

LIP

Money Management Services are currently being provided by Waltja Tjutangku Palyapayi, providing financial literacy training and support.

 

Three Yuendumu people are in apprenticeships with Mt Theo at the garage.

 

Increased Indigenous training and employment programmes.

LIP

Reviewed adult training facilities.

LIP

A community transport workshop was held in September 2011 to inform future transport service delivery.

LIP

Surveyed transport infrastructure in town and surrounding areas including serviced outstations.

 

Gazetted an areas plan, zoning map and town’s internal roads, including naming the roads.

LIP

Funding support for the Walpiri Rangers through the Working on Country Program.

 

Final report has been completed and sent to Banks and Department of Regional Development with a view to assist with removing barriers to accessing finance for investment on ALRA land.

LIP

Governance & Leadership

 

Elected members of Central Desert Shire Council received professional training to help them to better understandtheir roles.

LIP

A men’s group has been established and meets regularly.

LIP

The Mediation and Justice Committee was incorporated with the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations inMarch 2012 – the Committee, which has been working to address community issues since 2009, involves elders fromdifferent town camps in Yuendumu and is supported by the MacDonnell Shire.

 

 

Appendix J Delivery of services under other National Partnership Agreements by community

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

J.1 Early childhood

J.1.1 National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early ChildhoodDevelopment

The three elements of the National Partnership are outlined below – as are services and investments planned for the 29 priority locations.

Element 1: Children and Family Centres

The Children and Family Centres (CFCs) programme is managed by the former Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR). CFCs provide services responsive to community needs including child care, early learning and parent and family support services.

As at May 2013, four CFCs located in Remote Service Delivery (RSD) locations had been completed and were operational, with another four communities pending (Table J.1).

Table J.1 Communities targeted for Children and Family Centres and completion dates

Community

Completion dates

Comments/outcomes

Fitzroy Crossing

August 2012

An official opening was held on 2 July 2013

Yuendumu

December 2013*

Staff housing for the new Indigenous Children and Family Centre was completed in October 2010

Interim services are currently being provided to the community

Doomadgee

July 2012

An official opening was held on 28 May 2013

Gunbalanya

June 2014*

Interim services are currently being provided to the community

Halls Creek

October 2011

An official opening was held on 2 July 2013

Mornington Island

June 2012

An official opening is being held on 29 May 2013

Ngukurr

December 2013*

Interim services are currently being provided to the community

Maningrida

April 2014*

Interim services are currently being provided to the community

*Expected completion dates

Source: DEEWR 2013

Element 2: Increase access to antenatal care, pre-pregnancy and teenage sexual reproductive health

Under this element of the National Partnership, the Australian Government provided $107 million over five years to June 2014 in payments to state and territory governments to increase access to antenatal care, pre-pregnancy and teenage sexual and reproductive health services; while state and territory governments are responsible for decisions on service locations. Additional antenatal care, pre-pregnancy and teenage sexual and reproductive health services were established in 23 RSD locations as at June 2013 (Table J.2).

Table J.2 Communities with additional antenatal care, pre-pregnancy and teenage sexual and reproductive health services

RSD Communities

Comments/updates

Coen

Component D: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Maternal and Infant Health Program‑Midwife Intensivest and Maternal & Child Health Worker

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Component C: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young Women’s Healthy Life Program

Component A: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Health and Wellbeing Program

Mossman Gorge

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Amata

SA Element 2 Aim 1‑Shine Yarning On

Mimili

SA Element 2 Aim 1‑Shine Yarning On

Numbulwar

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken community consultation and estimates delivery of sexuality education to occur in August/September

Umbakumba

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken community consultation and estimates delivery of sexuality education to occur late 2013

Angurugu

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has completed consultations and delivered sexuality education. ASEPs sexuality education is now being delivered in the school on an ongoing basis for boys and girls

Aurukun

Component D: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Maternal and Infant Health Program‑Midwife Intensivest and Maternal & Child Health Worker

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Component C: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young Women’s Healthy Life Program

Doomadgee

Component D: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Maternal and Infant Health Program-OutreachMidwiferyService

Services Mornington Island and Doomadgee Remote Hospitals

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Gapuwiyak

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken community consultation and estimates delivery of sexuality education to occur in August/September

Gunbalanya

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken some consultation here however this has not resulted in training

Partnerships with NGOs‑Paper bark Project

Hope Vale

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Component A: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Health and Wellbeing Program

Component C: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young Women’s Healthy Life Program

Milingimbi

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken community consultation. Further consultation will occur in 2013 to build the capacity of the community prior to undertaking training

Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program (appointed Strong Women Workers)

Mornington Island

Component D: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Maternal and Infant Health Program-OutreachMidwiferyService

Services Mornington Island and Doomadgee Remote Hospitals

Component B: Qld Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Young People’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Program‑Early Childhood Sexual Health

Ngukurr

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has delivered training here and the school has begun delivering sexuality education to girls. Male staff and community members will have been trained by late June

Partnerships with NGOs‑Core of Life

Wilcannia

The Mental Health Drug and Alcohol Service (MHDAS) clinical positions based at Maari Ma Aboriginal Health Corporation, Broken Hill also provide a weekly outreach service to Wilcannia

Walgett

Recruitment to Mental Health Drug and Alcohol Service (MHDAS) clinical positions based in Walgett has been challenging. Due to the impact of rural and remote workforce shortages the decision has been made to base two positions in Bourke where the potential recruitment pool is more promising and an outreach service to Walgett and Lightning Ridge would be provided. Recruitment is presently underway. Consideration will be given to alternative models of providing services to Walgett if immediate recruitment is unsuccessful

Galiwin'ku

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has delivered training here. The school has been delivering to boys and girls and recent contact has indicated that further training may be required later this year to continue momentum. Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program (appointed Strong Women Workers). Partnerships with NGOs‑Core of Life

Maningrida

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has delivered training here on five occasions after extensive community consultation. The school, youth centre and FAFT are delivering training to boys and girls in the school and community settings. Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program after consultation with community recruitment just finalised. Partnerships with NGOs‑Core of Life

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

Consultation has occurred recently and training at the school will occur later this year. Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program (appointed Strong Women Workers)

Wadeye

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project(ASEP) has engaged in ongoing community consultation and has delivered some training. Further training is required to secure implementation which will occur later this year. Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program (appointed Strong Women Workers).Partnerships with NGOs‑Core of Life

Yirrkala

Adolescent Sexuality Education Project (ASEP) has undertaken community consultation. Some services have had staff trained in Gove training. Training occurring this week in Yirrkala homelands with teachers from Yirrkala school attending. Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Cultures Program (appointed Strong Women Workers).Partnerships with NGOs‑Core of Life

Yuendumu

Strong Women Strong Babies Strong Culture Program (appointed Strong Women Workers)

Source: DoHA, 2013

Element 3: Increase access to child and maternal health care

Element 3 comprises both Commonwealth own purpose funding and complementary investment by state and territory governments for mothers and babies services. The combined investment by states and territories under this element was $75 million over five years. Commonwealth own purpose funding totals $90.3 million over five years and is directed through the New Directions: Mothers and Babies Services programme which has been funding service delivery since the 2007–08 financial years.[127] Table J.3 shows the RSD locations where mothers and babies services were established as at February 2013.

Table J.3: RSD locations where mothers and babies services are being provided and the service providers providing the service

RSD locations

Service provider

Coen

Apunipima Cape York Health Council

Mossman Gorge

Apunipima Cape York Health Council

Mornington Island

Central and North West Queensland Medicare Local

Aurukun

Apunipima Cape York Health Council

Doomadgee

Central and North West Queensland Medicare Local

Hope Vale

Apunipima Cape York Health Council

Lajamanu

Katherine West Health Board

Yuendumu

Willowra, Yuendumu, Nyirripi Health Service

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

Western Arrernte Health Aboriginal Corporation

Ngukurr

Sunrise Health Service

Yirrkala

Laynhapuy Homelands Association Inc

Galiwin’ku

Miwatj Health Ngalkanbuy Clinic

Maningrida

NT Department of Health

Wadeye

NT Department of Health

Halls Creek

Yura Yungi Medical Service

Ardyaloon

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services

Beagle Bay

Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Services

Fitzroy Valley and surrounding communities

Ord Valley Aboriginal Health Service

Source DoHA, May 2013

J.1.2 National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education

The National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Early Childhood Education committed the Australian Government and the states and territories to work together to ensure that by 2013 all Australian children, including those in remote communities, have access to early childhood education in the year prior to formal schooling.

Under the NPA the Australian Government committed $970 million over the five years to 2012–2013, including $955 million to states and territories to support universal access and $15 million for data development and evaluation.

This commitment was underpinned by bilateral agreements including strategies to increase preschool participation by increasing the number of hours available to 15 per week, increasing the number of early childhood qualified and four year trained teachers delivering programmes, and reducing the cost where it is a barrier to participation.

Data derived from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) National Early Childhood and Care Collection indicates there were 550 Indigenous children aged four and five years old living in RSD communities who were enrolled in an early childhood education programme in 2012, this represents 95 per cent of the eligible population. There were 34 teachers with a three year degree qualification or higher, teaching a preschool programme in the RSD communities in 2012.

In June 2013, a new NPA on Universal Access to Early Childhood Education was signed by all governments to maintain universal access until 2014.

J.2 Schooling

J.2.1 Smarter Schools National Partnership Agreement

Low Socio-economic Status School Communities National Partnership Agreement

The Low Socio-economic Status School Communities National Partnership Agreement (NPA) supports reforms to address the complex challenges facing students in disadvantaged communities. The Australian Government committed $1.5 billion over seven years from 2009–10. FromJanuary2014, the NPA funding will be rolled into the new school funding arrangements.

Table J.4 shows that schools in RSD locations were selected to participate in the NPA. The selection of schools and the allocation of funding are the responsibility of state and territory governments in partnership with schooling authorities.

Table J.4: Communities and respective schools receiving assistance under the Low Socio-economic Status School Communities National Partnership Agreement

Community

School

Ardyaloon (Bardi Jawi)

One Arm Point Rem Com School

Beagle Bay

Sacred Heart School

Amata

Amata Anangu School

Fitzroy Valley

Fitzroy Valley District High, Ngalapita Rem Com School, Yakanarra Community School, Yiyili Aboriginal Community School

Lajamanu

Lajamanu CEC

Mimili

Mimili Anangu School

Numbulwar

Numbulwar CEC

Umbakumba

Alyarrmandumanja Umbakumba School

Wilcannia

Wilcannia Central School, St Therese’s Community School

Yuendumu

Yuendumu CEC, Mt Allan School, Willowra School

Angurugu

Angurugu CEC

Doomadgee

Doomadgee State School

Gapuwiyak

Gapuwiyak CEC

Gunbalanya

Gunbalanya CEC (Oenpelli)

Halls Creek

Halls Creek District High School, Warlawurru Catholic School

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

Ntaria School

Hope Vale

Hopevale State School

Milingimbi

Milingimbi CEC

Mornington Island

Mornington Island State School

Ngukurr

Ngukurr CEC

Walgett

St Joseph’s School , Walgett Community College –Primary and High Schools

Galiwin'ku

Shepherdson College

Maningrida

Maningrida CEC

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School, Xavier Community Education Centre

Wadeye

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarurr Catholic School

Yirrkala

Yirrkala CEC, Yirrkala Home Land School

Djarindjin-Lombadina (Bardi Jawi)

Djarindjin–Lombadina Catholic School

Source: DEEWR, 2013

Smarter Schools - Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership Agreement

The Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership Agreement (NPA) focused on teaching, leadership and the effective use of student performance information to deliver sustained improvement in literacy and numeracy. The Australian Government has committed $540 million over four years from 2008–09 to December 2012.

Schools in the three RSD locations participated in the NPA (Table J.5). The selection of schools and the allocation of funding were the responsibility of state and territory governments in partnership with schooling authorities.

Table J.5: Communities, schools and numeracy results for schools that received assistance under the Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership Agreement

Community

School

Numeracy results

Angurugu

Alyangula Area School

Over the four year numeracy results for year 3 students went from 60% above the national minimum standard in 2008 to 80% in 2012

Aurukun

Western Cape College

No information on MYSchool on the Aurukun campus

Walgett

St Joseph’s School

Over the four year numeracy results for year 5 students went from 45% above the national minimum standard in 2008 to 80 % in 2012

Source: DEEWR, 2013

National Partnership Agreement on Improving Literacy and Numeracy

Following the success of the Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership Agreement which concluded in December 2012, the Australian Government has provided an additional $243.9 million to sustain momentum over the 2013 school year. The new Improving Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership Agreement is estimated to reach 38.2 per cent of Indigenous students which is a 24.5percentagepoint increase (from 13.7 per cent) on the previous NPA. The selection of schools and the allocation of funding are the responsibility of state and territory governments in partnership with schooling authorities. State and territory governments are required to select schools on the basis of four priority categories, including demonstrated need. In addition, there is a strong focus on lifting the achievement of the lowest performing students, as shown by National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) data.

National Partnership Agreement on the Digital Education Revolution

A key element of this National Partnership Agreement on the Digital Education Revolution is the National Secondary School Computer Fund (the Computer Fund) which has helped schools to provide access to new information and communications technology for secondary students in Years 9 to 12. A one to one computer to student ratio has been achieved nationally with more than 967,000 computers installed, exceeding the national target of 786,000 computers. Table J.6 shows the RSD locations where schools have had computers installed under the Computer Fund.

Table J.6: Communities in which schools had computers installed as part of the National Secondary School Computer Fund as at 17 September 2012

Community

Number of computers installed

Comments

Beagle Bay

8

 

Amata

29

 

Fitzroy Valley

58

 

Lajamanu

17

 

Numbulwar

23

 

Umbakumba

26

 

Wilcannia

65

 

Yuendumu

8

 

Angurugu

30

 

Doomadgee

20

 

Gapuwiyak

32

 

Gunbalanya

96

 

Halls Creek

38

 

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

6

 

Milingimbi

54

 

Mornington Island

43

 

Ngukurr

37

 

Walgett

85

 

Galiwin'ku

81

 

Maningrida

50

 

Nguiu (Wurrumiyanga)

51

The Xavier Secondary College library is equipped with computers and provides library services to students during school hours

Wadeye

97

 

Yirrkala

86

 

Bardi Jawi

10

 

16

Djarindjin-Lombadina Catholic School listed as servicing two communities under Bardi Jawi; Djarindjin and Lombadina

One Arm Point Remote Community School listed as servicing the Ardyaloon community, under Bardi Jawi

Aurukun

152

 

Mimili

12

 

Source: As reported by government and non-government education authorities to DEEWR.

J.3 Health

J.3.1 Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes National Partnership Agreement

The National Partnership Agreement (NPA) targets:

· tackling smoking

· primary health care services that can deliver

· fixing the gaps and improving the patient journey

· providing a healthy transition to adulthood

· making Indigenous health everyone’s business.

The Indigenous Chronic Disease Package is the Australian Government’s component of the NPA which commenced on 1 July 2009. It aims to provide national coverage to ensure all communities benefit across Australia.

Regional Tackling Smoking and Healthy Lifestyle teams located across Australia focus on reducing smoking rates and increasing health promotion activities. Health professionals have been trained to provide chronic disease self-management skills to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with, or at risk of, chronic disease to better manage their conditions.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander outreach workers are working in Aboriginal community controlled health organisations and Medicare Locals to improve outreach and access to health services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. The Practice Incentive Payment – Indigenous Health Incentive is increasing the number of accredited Indigenous health services and general practices providing better chronic disease management.

The Care Coordination and Supplementary Services and Medical Outreach‑Indigenous Chronic Disease programmes have supported individual patients by coordinating and providing access to multidisciplinary chronic disease care.

All 29 RSD communities received assistance under the package.

Source: DoHA, 2013

J.4 Economic participation

J.4.1 National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation

Element 1: Jobs in Government Service Delivery under the National Partnership Agreement

Element 1 of this agreement involves complementary investment and effort by the Australian, state and territory governments to significantly improve opportunities for Indigenous people to engage in private and public sector jobs.

The objective of this element was the creation and funding of new ongoing positions in government service delivery previously supported by Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP).

A total of 1,538 positions were created under this initiative: 1,235 in areas of Australian Government service delivery and a further 303 in state government services. These positions include access to the full range of benefits that come with employment such as proper wages, superannuation and training. Jobs created are in government sectors including community care, sport and recreation, education support, art centre support, broadcasting, language and culture, rangers, night patrols and municipalservices.

This process has been finalised as all positions have been identified and created. As a result this will be the final report on the status of the jobs created under Element 1 of the National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation.

Northern Territory Jobs Package

Under the Northern Territory Jobs Package and as at 30June 2010, 2,241 jobs were converted from CDEP, with most (2,233) of them filled.

J.5 Healthy homes

J.5.1 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing

The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH) aims to achieve reform in the provision of housing for Indigenous people in remote communities. Through NPARIH the Australian Government will provide $5.48 billion over 10 years to 2018 to address significant overcrowding, homelessness, poor housing conditions and the severe housing shortage in remote Indigenous communities. NPARIH aims to deliver over 4,200 new houses by June 2018 as well as refurbishments/rebuilds to over 4,876 houses. Nationally as at 30 June 2013, 2,025 new houses and over 5,887 refurbishments and rebuilds had been delivered. Of these NPARIH houses, 58 per cent (1,173) of new houses and 30 per cent (1,793) of existing houses that had been rebuilt or refurbished were delivered in RSD communities (Table J.7).

Table J.7 Status of Land tenure reforms and number of new houses and refurbishments/rebuilds completed as at 30 June 2013 for each RSD location.

Jurisdiction

RSD Location

Status of land tenure reforms

New houses

Refurbishments or rebuilds

New South Wales

Walgett

New housing will be obtained by constructing new houses or acquiring existing houses on freehold land

23

81

 

Wilcannia

New housing will be obtained by constructing new houses or acquiring existing houses on freehold land

11

65

 

Total

 

34

146

Queensland

Aurukun

In principle agreement to sign Deed of Agreement to Lease on all housing

31

65

 

Coen

The proposed investments will proceed on freehold held by the State

3

0

 

Doomadgee

Executed Deed of Agreement to Lease on new housing only, with in-principle agreement over the remainder ofhousing

42

106

 

Hope Vale

Executed Deed of Agreement to Lease over new and upgraded housing on 2 March 2010, and for current housing on 16 April 2010.

16

114

 

Mornington Island

In principle agreement to sign Deed of Agreement toLease

16

76

 

Mossman Gorge

Negotiations are currently underway with the community for a secure tenure plan

0

0

 

Total

 

108

361

South Australia

Amata

50 year lease executed (Variations to encompass all new investments executed)

33

42

 

Mimili

50 year lease executed (Variations to encompass all new investments executed)

31

26

 

Total

 

64

68

Western Australia

Ardyaloon

Includes 3 communities on Dampier Peninsula

37

51

 

Beagle Bay

Construction to date has occurred on land where tenure is secure Negotiations for a housing management agreement to secure all future investments will shortlycommence (a)

15

67

 

Fitzroy Valley

Construction to date has occurred on land where tenure is secure. Negotiations for housing management agreements to secure all future investments will shortlycommence (a)

61

77

 

Halls Creek

Construction to date has occurred on land where tenure is secure Negotiations for housing management agreements to secure all future investments will shortlycommence a

28

48

 

Total

 

141

243

Northern Territory

Angurugu

80 year lease signed 4 December 2008

60

35

 

Galiwin’ku

40 year lease signed 10 September 2009

90

74

 

Gapuwiyak

40 year lease signed 9 September 2010

51

51

 

Gunbalanya

40 year lease signed 16 August 2009

62

70

 

Lajamanu

40 year lease signed June 2011

17

82

 

Maningrida

40 year lease signed 21 August 2009

110

117

 

Milingimbi

40 year lease signed 9 September 2010

67

46

 

Ngukurr

40 year lease signed 14 October 2010

59

60

 

Ntaria (Hermannsburg)

40 year lease signed 26 June 2011

32

66

 

Numbulwar

40 year lease signed 5 September 2011

65

53

 

Umbakumba

80 year lease signed 4 December 2008

18

42

 

Wadeye

40 year lease signed 16 September 2009

105

117

 

Wurrumiyanga (Nguiu)

99 year lease signed 30 August 2007

90

160

 

Yirrkala

Lease signed in May 2013

0

2

 

Yuendumu

40 year lease signed 11 April 2013

0

0

 

Total

 

826

975

Grand Total

 

 

1,173

1,793

a In Western Australia, Legislative Amendments were passed on 18 May 2010 to enable the State Housing Authority to enter into statutory Housing Management Agreements with local Aboriginal community corporations over Aboriginal Crown reserves. Housing Management Agreements provide the State Housing Authority with the requisite degree of control over the housing stock to protect housing investments and implement property and tenancy management reforms.

Source: FaHCSIA, 30 June 2013

J.6 Other Initiatives

J.6.1 Building the Education Revolution

The Australian Government spent $16.2 billion to help improve school facilities across Australia. Around 23,600 projects were funded in around 9,500 schools.The Building the Education Revolution (BER) programme improved learning facilities for thousands of Australian schools through funding new infrastructure projects and refurbishments. This programme was the largest part of the Australian Government’s $42 billion National Partnership Agreement on the Nation Building and Jobs Plan, supporting jobs and infrastructure projects in every community across Australia.

Schools in all 29 priority locations received significant upgrades to school facilities since 2009. Allcommunities received funding from the Primary Schools for the 21st Century (including new libraries, multi-purpose halls, classrooms and refurbishments) and National School Pride (to refurbish buildings and construct or upgrade infrastructure), while seven communities (Walgett, Galiwin’ku, Gunbalanya, Gapuwiyak, Maningrida, Milingimbi and Wadeye) also received funding for Science and Language Centres for 21st Century Secondary Schools to refurbish or construct new science laboratories or language learning centres.

J.6.2 Trade Training Centres in Schools Program

The Trade Training Centres in Schools Program enables eligible secondary schools to seek funding for trade training facilities for their Year 9 to 12 students. The future of the programme is currently being considered by the Australian Government.

The Trade Training Centres in Schools Program operated in 26 RSD locations at August 2013 (TableJ.8).

Table J.8 RSD locations for Trade Training Centres in Schools Program

Community

Commencement date

Amata

The project commenced operation on 1 November 2012.

Angurugu

Construction has been completed at two of the three sites for this project, including Angurugu. Construction at all sites is expected to be completed in May 2014.

Bardi Jawi

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013 (Christ the King Catholic School and One Arm Point Remote Community School‑Ardyaloon / Djarindjin / Lombadina). A funding agreement is expected to be finalisedshortly.

Beagle Bay

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Doomadgee

The project commenced operation on 13 July 2011.

Galiwin’ku

The agreement for this project was executed on 15 April 2013.

Gapuwiyak

The agreement for this project was executed on 15 April 2013.

Gunbalanya

Construction has been completed at the Gunbalanya site for this project. Construction at the second project site (Jabiru) is expected to be completed in December 2013.

Halls Creek

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Lajamanu

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Maningrida

The agreement for this project was executed on 15 April 2013.

Milingimbi

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Mornington Island

The project commenced operation on 13 July 2011.

Mimili

The project commenced operation on 1 November 2012.

Mossman Gorge

The project commenced operation on 25 January 2011.

Ngukurr

Construction has been completed at the Ngukurr site for this project. Construction at all project sites is expected to be completed in June 2014.

Ntaria

The funding agreement for this project was executed on 15 April 2013.

Numbulwar

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Umbakumba

Construction has been completed at two of the three sites for this project, including Umbakumba. Construction at all sites is expected to be completed in May 2014.

Wadeye

The project commenced operation on 7 February 2011.

Walgett

Construction of this project was completed on 13 June 2013.

Wilcannia

The project commenced operation on 6 February 2012.

Wurrumiyanga

The project commenced operation on 2 August 2011.

Yirrkala

The funding agreement for this project was executed on 15 April 2013.

Yuendumu

Funding was approved for this project in August 2013. A funding agreement is expected to be finalised shortly.

Source: DEEWR

 

Appendix K Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account

Compiled by Evidence and Evaluation Branch

K.1 Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account process

A key flexibility offered by the Indigenous Remote Service Delivery (IRSD) Special Account is the ability to expend the funding on a broad range of projects that cut across traditional portfolio responsibilities. Funding for the IRSD Special Account was provided by the former Australian Government Departments of FaHCSIA, DEEWR and DoHA and additional contributions can be made by state/territory governments or other Australian Government agencies or other organisations. Theprocurement of goods or services and grants funding were managed by FaHCSIA (now PM&C) on behalf of the Australian Government. Overarching accountability for funding decisions rests with PM&C, as the agency responsible for managing the appropriation provided through the Special Account and for reporting public disclosure in its annual financial report. The IRSD Special Account commenced on 1July 2010.

Expenditure from the IRSD Special Account is supported by a governance framework involving stakeholders from state governments, the Northern Territory Government and Australian Government agencies. Project proposals are identified by a community proponent and the IRSD Special Account guidelines allow Government Business Managers (GBMs) or equivalent to help community groups develop proposals. The Boards of Management (BOMs) in each jurisdiction can also provide input on the development of proposals and often play a role to identify if funding is available through other government programmes.

Proposals were considered by a Jurisdictional Tripartite Group in each jurisdiction comprising of the State Managers from the former Departments of FaHCSIA, DEEWR and DoHA. The Jurisdictional Tripartite Groups allowed collaboration across the three agencies that made the initial contributions to the IRSD Special Account.Proposals could also be referred to the National Tripartite Group if necessary. The National Tripartite Group also comprised of senior officials from the three departments. The National Tripartite Group also had responsibility for considering any funding proposals for expenditure over $1 million before forwarding the proposal to the former FaHCSIA Minister for approval. Following the 2013 Machinery of Government changes the IRSD Special Account Guidelines and procedures are under review.

The following table provides an account of all Special Account expenditure as at 30June 2013, byjurisdiction under each building block.

Table K1 Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account expenditure as at 30 June 2013

New South Wales

Project name

Funding ($)

Walgett

Walgett Interactive Programme for Youth

50,000

Special Olympics - to provide an avenue for identified participants to engage in a regular structured sporting activity that is tailored to meet specific needs

11,000

Walgett Aboriginal (Rugby League) Knockout - a drug, alcohol and smoke free event aimed at promoting positive lifestyles for men, women and youth

23,000

Upgrade of playground infrastructure at Walgett Community College

18,990

St. Joseph’s Primary School upgrade of playground soft fall

35,000

Walgett diversionary youth activities - funding for a full-time Youth Worker tasked to achieve better outcomes for vulnerable youth in Walgett

4,685

Walgett and Gingie Community Hub facility upgrades

258,734

Walgett Police Mobile Youth Van

175,000

Birraleegal Preschool garden and outdoor equipment - provision of a high quality outdoor learning environment for children

15,534

Birraleegal Preschool Shaded Areas - upgrades required to meet National Quality Standards for Early Childhood Education and Care services

48,074

Dharriwaa Elders Group newsletter - to enable Dharriwaa Elders Group staff to resume production of the Yundiboo Magazine

13,500

Wilcannia

Development of the Wilcannia Safety Plan

19,830

Wilcannia Youth Workers - to engage with at risk young people living in difficult and complex circumstances with a lack of support networks

114,340

Wilcannia River Radio Community Interactive Website

700

Healthy Food Programme for Children

92,295

Wilcannia Tutorial Centre Project for high risk disengaged young people

190,000

Wings Drop-in Youth Centre resources, including sport, electronic, educational and cultural equipment

17,000

Community School Infrastructure Upgrades

75,000

Aboriginal Literacy Campaign Pilot

30,000

Student Behaviour and Wellbeing targeted programmes - funding of a full-time Student Behaviour and Wellbeing Officer at the school for two years

190,000

Engagement of an Aboriginal Arts and Enterprise Development Officer for WilcanniaArts Inc.

156,000

Wilcannia RSPCA Animal Health Clinics

25,384

Establishment of the Wilcannia Men's Shed to deliver key men’s programmes from and house fitness equipment

149,800

Wilcannia Men's Dance and Culture Group - to establish a website promoting Paakantji dance and culture, develop a marketing strategy for the group with the long-term aim of becoming an economic enterprise

23,000

Baker Park Family Recreation Area - purchase and installation of new learning, cultural, outdoor, sporting and furnishing resources

90,000

Wilcannia Elders' Space - purchase and installation of indoor seating and tables; industrial size freezer; painting the centre; outdoor shading, seating and family meals area; and landscaping of outdoors family gathering and yarning spaces

9,500

Wilcannia Radio Station Business Manager/Coordinator - funding for a period of 12months to enable capacity building and handover of operations to locally recruited Station Supervisor

80,000

Cross-RSD Communities within NSW

Blank Page Leaders’ Summit - funding travel and incidentals for attendance at three meetings

36,242

NSW Total

 

1,952,608

 

Queensland

Project name

Funding ($)

Aurukun

Development of the Aurukun Wik and Kugu Arts Centre

300,000

Aurukun community upgrades, including the establishment of a new cemetery, construction of a war memorial and stage 2 upgrades of the sporting oval

449,000

Coen

Upgrade works - Coen Aerodrome

300,000

Establishment of a Coen Community Communication Network providing a vital communication network for Indigenous people

10,000

Provision of a casual qualified Early Childhood Education staff member for the Coen Kindergarten Association Inc. in order to maintain appropriate staff tochildratios

8,321

Coen Housing WALT Agreement - essential expenses funding for the management of three lots (including infrastructure) held by WunthulpuAboriginalLand Trust

120,000

Doomadgee

Repair and purchase of street lighting

98,000

Construct a BMX Track and purchase and install air-conditioning for the Parentingand Family Services Building

90,000

Purchase of an outdoor cinema unit

7,500

Doomadgee Parents Supporting Learning Initiative to increase children'sattendance

523,375

Hope Vale

Local Implementation Plan - Welfare Reform Document development, design andcommunications

50,000

Hope Vale Banana Farm infrastructure

233,000

Refurbishment of the old HVASC offices to a new retail precinct to support locally ownedbusinesses

191,000

Mornington Island

Repair and purchase street lighting

86,000

Establishment of the Innovative Learning Centre and Young Mothers LearningCentre

160,000

Purchase of an outdoor cinema unit

7,500

MSC Rural Transaction Centre Extension to cater for an additional six offices andmeeting space for visiting stakeholder meetings

650,000

Mornington Island Parents Supporting Learning Initiative to increase children'sattendance

403,375

Mornington Island / Mirndiyan Gununa Language Readers Development - funding to develop modern literature for use by current and future students atschool

20,000

Mossman Gorge

Welfare Reform and Remote Service Delivery engagement

250,000

Transitioning of municipal and essential services from Mossman Gorge Municipal service delivery to Bamanga Bubu Ngadimunku (2projects)

444,000

Mossman Gorge Art Supply business development

48,000

Mossman Gorge Training Centre Public Internet Computer and TeleconferenceConnection

10,000

Screening of the Mossman Gorge community from the main thoroughfare to MossmanGorge

30,000

Evolve Community Consultants Mt Isa multi-community Leadership workshops andtraining

79,820

Cross-RSD Communities within Qld

Delivery of the Pride in My Home Initiative for Doomadgee and Mornington Island

675,000

Development of the Doomadgee and Mornington Island Community SafetyActionplans

300,000

Cape York Welfare Reform operational support funding

450,000

Development of Coen and Aurukun Business Plans by Bain Business Management Pty Ltd

17,600

Qld Total

 

6,011,491

 

South Australia

Project name

Funding ($)

Amata

Establishment of a Men's Art and Culture Space

80,000

One and All programme funding to promote young people not attending school tore‑engage

54,000

Community Pride Project - initiated to address identified gaps in arts and crafts activities for youth

50,000

Purchase of music equipment for Amata Youth Centre

7,000

Heating and Pool Blanket for Amata Community Pool

34,000

Purchase of swimming pool equipment for Amata Anangu School

16,000

Minor refurbishment of Amata Men’s Artefact Precinct

55,000

Minor repairs to the Tjurma Bush Products building in Amata

12,000

Scoping study for the community artists in residence programme that was delivered at Amata Anangu School in 2011 and early 2012

880

Contribution towards labour costs for the Sandtracks concert in Amata

1,364

Purchase of a keyboard and accessories to support events held at the Amatachurch

882

Installation of lighting at the Amata oval. Minor electrical works to AmataArtsCentre

4,085

Purchase of blankets and tents for a sorry camp

191

Purchase of equipment to support the sports carnival (football and softball)

2,137

Purchase of traffic safety signs for a pedestrian crossing in Amata

240

Funding towards the Tackling Humbug through Street Theatre initiative

30,300

Emergency Assistance for Traditional Ceremony

18,182

Amata Night Patrol

32,208

Purchase of essential items relating to an Amata cultural event

295

Support for the Grammy Award winning band ‘Tinariwen’ to perform in Amata

6,000

Purchase of items relating to the Amata community end of year celebration

2,448

Funding provided to the South Australian National Football League for the purchase of equipment for the Amata football team

3,464

Purchase of various essential items to SA. Other minor expenses - water and food, football team support, youth centre music

3,342

Funding for the Department of Education and Child Development to undertake urgent repairs to the Amata Swimming Pool

3,333

Rock City Music: music equipment for the Amata youth centre music programme

1,727

Amata Night Patrol Insurance (2nd year)

4,202

Amata Night Patrol Conflict Resolution Training

4,219

Rainwater tanks for the Amata Swimming Pool

49,950

Presenters fees for the Sand Tracks 2012 Tour

2,500

Mimili

Purchase of football and softball equipment for use by the community

15,000

Purchase of new bikes, helmets and accessories to support SAPOL's bike maintenance and safe bike riding programme.

5,409

Delivery of a tyre fitting course to community members

4,000

Contribution towards the construction of the new arts centre for the Ananguku Mimili Maku Arts Aboriginal Corporation

142,000

Mimili Church repairs and restoration

88,000

Construction of Mimili School entrance wall

27,000

Delivery of the VacSwim Water Safety and Survival Youth Programme

5,000

Yankunytjatjara Wangka language preservation project aimed at recording and preserving the endangered Yankunytjatjara language

41,000

Relocation of Mimili Stock Watering Point

49,900

Purchase of forklift for Mimili Maku Store

31,890

Purchase of essential items relating to a Mimili community event

1,374

Funding to undertake urgent repairs to the Mimili Swimming Pool

3,333

Purchase of essential items (food and water) for a whole of community meeting

2,000

Construction of the Mimili Community Hall

250,000

Mimili Night Patrol operational support

25,546

Delivery of the VacSwim Programme

5,000

Mimili Night Patrol equipment.

3,402

Cross-RSD Communities within SA

Tjitji Tjutaku Inma (Childrens Inma) - developed for children across the APY Lands schools to participate in a project to revitalise the teaching of Inma. Theproject will produce books and audio visual products

163,000

Tjitju Tjutaku Inma Phase 2

186,000

Funding support to facilitate youth attendance at the Blank Page Summit - HardYarn Youth Mob 2011

75,000

Purchase of protective cases for the Ara Irititja archive stations In the PYKuCentres

18,078

Relocation of the community council bus for repairs

423

Purchase of music equipment for the youth centre music programmes

2,625

PY Ku Centres operational support funding

93,331

PY Ku Centres Transitional Funding and Business Plan - Engagement of consultant to undertake business study

36,364

PY Ku infrastructure upgrade and transition funding to support the network of PY Ku Rural Transaction Centres on the APY Lands to transition to a sustainable model of operations through improvements to the governance of PY Ku Aboriginal Corporation and the infrastructure of the centres

200,000

Funding for the Anangu Work Expo Travelling Road Show

7,000

Community notice boards and set up fee

6,870

Purchase of shipping containers for secure storage of cultural artefacts

6,938

APY Furniture construction and Assembly Training Project

45,500

Installation of rainwater tanks at the Family and Wellbeing Centre

49,900

Adelaide Football Club Aboriginal Youth Leadership Programme

300,000

Production of the Deadly Dollars DVD - a consumer literacy DVD in Pitjantjatjara

49,950

Delivery of the Interactive Ochre Employee Induction Programme

45,000

SA Total

 

2,465,782

 

Western Australia

Project name

Funding ($)

Bardi Jaw

Djarindjin central precinct upgrade

56,632

Djarindjin Dust Suppression, Road Maintenance and Pest Management Project

91,500

Governance Project for Bardi Jawi communities

155,000

Lombadina fuel tank safety and compliance testing

8,345

Construction of the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate Office

600,000

Beagle Bay

Delivery of the Beagle Bay Youth Engagement and Leadership Programme

60,682

Beagle Bay Store - transitional governance support

40,000

Beagle Bay Administration Building - repair of white ant damage

297,000

Beagle Bay Women’s Centre electrical upgrade - inclusive of installing residualcurrentdevices

5,280

Purchase of a water pump to avoid flooding at the cemetery

4,271

Fitzroy Valley

Funding for Marninwarntikura Fitzroy Women's Resource and Legal Centre

317,717

Delivery of the Fitzroy Valley Youth Coordination Project

285,000

Fitzroy Valley Health Service plumbing and refrigeration upgrades

45,000

Funding support for the Marninwarntikura Women’s Bush Meeting March 2012

114,000

Implementation of the Fitzroy Valley Alcohol Management Plan

30,000

Halls Creek

Halls Creek Music Festival - governance support

30,000

Engagement of a Youth Services Network Coordinator

171,500

Halls Creek Healing Project

85,000

Employment of two Living Change Extension Officers living in Halls Creek

400,000

Provision of baby seats for safety bus operation

987

Cross-RSD Communities within WA

Funding support for cultural governance projects

632,500

Development of Environmental Health Action Plans for RSD sites

90,000

Development of Suicide Prevention Plans in RSD sites

90,000

Attendance support for the Blank Page Summit - Hard Yarn Youth Mob 2011

10,000

Aboriginal Mental Health First Aid (AMHFA) Project

4,500

Kimberley Employment Based Accommodation Project - four hostel facilities located in Broome, Burks Park (Halls Creek), Derby and Fitzroy Valley

451,000

WA Total

 

4,075,914

 

Northern Territory

Project name

Funding ($)

Angurugu

Sealing of the Angurugu Aged Care driveway

45,327

Galiwin’ku

Relocation of demountable accommodation for visiting health practitioners

166,035

Lajamanu

Refurbishment of the Longhouse visitor accommodation

150,000

Maningrida

Funding for students to travel to Darwin to attend the Student Science Awards

3,000

Provision of the Maningrida fire engine

91,233

Milingimbi

Milingimbi roads upgrade

513,192

Purchase of gym equipment

30,540

Ngukurr

Ngukurr's Inaugural Cultural Festival - provision of sound equipment

24,000

Yugul Mangi's Inaugural Cultural Festival - provision of sound equipment

15,000

Ntaria

Relocatable water supply for cultural business

21,050

Construction of the Ntaria Youth Facility

3,500,000

Numbulwar

Grader purchase for the Numbulwar Numburindi community

395,000

Umbakumba

Evaluation of the Groote telecommunications 3G mobile phone service

40,000

Purchase of Groote Eylandt Youth Services Co-ordinator team car and computer

53,400

Wadeye

Youth Drop In Centre fit out

60,000

Delivery of the Wadeye Football Club entry into NTFL Programme

50,000

Wadeye Police - purchase of Community Liaison Officer vehicle

38,830

Wadeye Festival - purchase of musical instruments and amplification equipment

25,000

Replacement of four classrooms at the Our Lady of the Sacred Heart ThamarrurrSchool

2,182,514

Wurrumiyanga

Youth Drop-in Centre fit out

39,463

Funding support to preserve Tiwi Island Historic and Cultural collections

7,269

Establishment of a community notice board

11,000

Yirrkala

Continuation of the Yirrkala Surf Life Saving Club -ImmediateShort‑termProgramme

20,100

Yirrkala Families As First Teachers kitchen upgrade (Bopul)

49,727

Oval lighting repairs and upgrades

56,104

Yirrkala Basketball Court upgrade

100,077

Yuendumu

Establishment of a parent room at Yuendumu School

5,800

Funding for a Women Coordinator and Domestic Violence Counsellor at Yuendumu Women's Centre Safe House

45,280

Cross-RSD Communities within the NT

Support for education on dog management in remote communities

200,000

Engaging with families affected by MJD - four projects in Galiwin’ku, Ngukurr, Yirrkala and Groote Eylandt

179,900

Funding support for the Groote Eylandt Substance Misuse Summit

64,309

NT critical infrastructure - power and water

7,000,000

NT Total

 

15,183,149

Other projects

Cataract surgery in NSW and NT

499,185

 

Funding support for the National Aboriginal Men’s Health Summit

400,000

 

Interpreters project

1,150,000

Other projects total

 

2,049,185

Grand Total

 

31,738,130

 

Appendix L Stakeholder interview guide

O’Brien Rich Research Group

L.1 Stakeholder semi-structured interview schedule

Image showing interview form with text: "We are interested in your views about the changes since the national partnership agreement on remote service delivery was rolled out in 2009/10. This agreement was meant to change the way government does business with this community."

The government is undertaking an evaluation over the next six-months to look at how well the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) is working. In this part of the evaluation we are interested in the views of key people involved in the delivery of the RSD. For example:

  • whether services have actually improved or changed
  • whether community and government are working together better
  • if different levels of government are better coordinating service delivery
  • what can be improved/lessons learned.

Before we get started, I need to tell you that everything you say is completely confidential. We will make sure that you cannot be identified from your comments in the report.

Although we are interested in how well the role you play is working in a general sense, we are certainly not in any way assessing your individual performance nor will we be reporting on it in thatway.

Intro: We will begin with a few questions about you.

Name ______________________________________________________________________

ROC/Agency ________________________________________________________________

Length of time in the job/role: __________________________________________________________________________

If less than 3 months, what were you doing before this: ___________________________________________________________________________

Intro: The aim of the RSD is to improve services and infrastructure in this community. The process started with putting together a community Local Implementation Plan (LIP). We will talk about that process later.

  1. I’m interested to know if there are any new or better services in the (name of community) since the RSD in the Closing the Gap priority areas. Have you seen changes in:

· Early childhood (preschool, kindergarten, child care)?

· Schooling?

· Health?

· Healthy homes

· Community safety?

· Employment and training?

  • Probes for each priority area:
  • better / more people have access?
  • quality improved?
  • more kids at school; parents more interested?
  • less crowding, more looking after houses?
  • community safer?
  • training; more jobs; assisted to set up a business?
  • more courses; taking responsibility?
  1. Of all the changes you have mentioned, which changes do you think are the most important in terms of making the community a better place to live in?

 

  1. Do you think most of these changes are because of the RSD or might they have happenedanyway?

 

  1. Are there still areas for improvement (more services / different services / better access)?

If areas for improvement:

  • What do you think is stopping the changes that are needed in the community?
  1. The philosophy underpinning RSD is that the target communities should be brought up to a standard of services broadly consistent with non-Indigenous communities:
  • In your opinion, is this an appropriate or realistic benchmark?
  • Is it being achieved?

Intro: A key objective of the RSD is that different levels of Government work together in a more coordinated way. There is an expectation that communities would see a single Government interface.

  1. What role does the ROC play in coordination of Commonwealth/State/Local Government services?
  • How well is it operating?
  • How well does the ROC work with the GBM position and the Indigenous EngagementOfficer?
  • What have been the benefits of a single government interface? (for community, forfederal government, for state government?)
  • What have been the challenges?
  • What changes would you like to see?
  • What’s stopping these changes from happening?
  1. What do you see as the role and benefits of the GBM (GEC/RSD Coordinator/ LAC)?
  • Does it make it easier for the government to consult, communicate and negotiate withcommunities?
  • Does the position make it easier for government to deliver and coordinate services?
  • Does the position work well for the community?
  • Do you see it empowering the community or is there a risk of a dependency relationship forming?
  • Do you experience any conflicts between community and government expectations?
  • What changes, if any, would you like to see?
  1. What do you see as the role and benefits of the Indigenous Engagement Officer positions?
  • Does the IEO position make it easier for government to deliver and coordinateservices?
  • Does the position make it easier for the government to consult, communicate and negotiate with communities?
  • Does it work well for the community? (e.g. help explain government business to the community and help the community to convey their needs)
  • Do you see it empowering the community or is there a risk of a dependency relationship forming?
  • What changes, if any, would you like to see?
  1. Do you think other government agencies understand the concept of the RSD and the Single Government Interface?
  • Have you seen changes in other government agencies that support the concept of the Single Government Interface?
  • What changes would you like to see in the future?

Intro: Next we have a few questions about the Local Reference Groups, or the equivalent community governance structures, in the RSD communities.

  1. How well has the Local Reference Group worked in the RSD communities?
  • What has worked and what can be done better?
  • How has it changed over time?
  1. Is there consistency between the LRGs priorities and what the government thinks the community needs?
  • If ‘No’: How are the inconsistencies handled?

Intro: We now have some questions about the Local Implementation Plans.

  1. Do you think the Local Implementation Plan has been useful?
  • Was the baseline mapping data about services and gaps useful in developing the LIP?
  • Does the LIP address the gaps identified by the baseline mapping data?
  • Does the LIP reflect what the community wants?
  • Do you think the current plan is realistic?
  • How useful has the review process of the LIPs been?
  • Is it used by all levels of government to plan and prioritise services and programs?
  • Does it/should it involve local government?
  • Does it help to coordinate what everyone is doing (government and community)?
  1. In your opinion, is it effective to undertake these plans on a community-by-community basis or would regional plans be more effective?

Intro: An objective of RSD was to build the level of governance and leadership in the community.

  1. Do you think community governance and leadership has been strengthened as a result of RSD?
  • Has there been any training or other projects to build community governance and leadership capacity? (e.g. actions outlined in this part of the LIP)
  • Has the LRG had an effect on leadership and governance in the community?
  • Do you feel that the community is taking more responsibility for dealing with challenges? (i.e. less passive, taking more ownership of problems and solutions, less looking towards government for solutions)

Intro: RSD intended to improve the way services work together and are delivered in the community. We have a few questions about service providers.

  1. Has the capacity of government and service provider staff to engage with the community improved under the RSD?
  • Has there been cultural awareness training?
  • Has there been training or guidance to staff about community engagement and working in a collaborative, whole-of-government manner?
  • Has there been a change in staff mindset / attitude to working together and working with the community?
  1. Have you seen a change in the way service providers work as a result of the RSD?
  • Are services more coordinated?
  • Are services more aware of what the community wants/needs?
  • Are service providers responding to what the community wants/needs?
  • Are they partnering more with community organisations or groups?
  • What would you like to see changed?

Intro: We would like to ask you about your views about the concept of RSD as a whole.

  1. What do you think of the concept of RSD?
  • Do you think it is a good idea?
  • Has it really been fully achieved in this community?
  • What is still left to do?
  • Do you think it will ever be fully implemented?

Intro: To sum up, we have a couple of questions about the most important changes andbarriers.

  1. Thinking back over everything we’ve talked about, what do you think were the three or four biggest difficulties you had in this community trying to implement RSD?

 

  1. And again, thinking back over everything we’ve talked about, what do you think are the three or four most important or significant changes that have happened in the community because of RSD?

Intro: Our last question is about the future.

  1. If this community were going really well in five or 10 years’ time, what would that look like? (If we came back then, what sorts of things would we see?)

 

 

Thank you so much for your time and contribution to the evaluation.

Do you have any further comments or questions?

 

Appendix M Service provider survey: data tables and questionnaire

Dr Judy Putt

M.1 Service provider survey data

Table M.1 Perceived effectiveness of Remote Operational Centres (ROCs) and GBMs (or equivalent) in helping the coordination of service delivery, by state (%)

 

 

WA

SA

NT

Qld

NSW

Total

Regional Operational Centres

 

Very effective

16

6

5

30

0

11

Quite effective

48

33

37

26

24

37

Not very effective

14

39

26

22

28

23

Not effective

12

0

11

4

24

11

Don't know

10

22

22

17

24

18

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

GECs/GBMs/GECs/IEOs and RSD Coords

 

Very effective

25

28

21

26

8

22

Quite effective

32

39

35

26

24

32

Not very effective

15

17

26

19

12

19

Not effective

12

6

8

4

20

10

Don't know

17

11

11

26

36

18

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

                 

n=189-196.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.2 Perceived effectiveness of Local Implementation Plans in identifying local community priorities, by state (%)

 

 

WA

SA

NT

Qld

NSW

Total

Identifying local community priorities

 

Very effective

33

6

15

26

0

19

Quite effective

43

12

45

26

48

39

Not very effective

8

35

15

26

24

17

Not effective

7

12

3

7

12

7

Don't know

10

35

21

15

16

17

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

                 

n=196.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.3 Perceived effectiveness of Local Reference Groups in helping communityengagement, by state (%)

 

WA

SA

NT

Qld

NSW

Total

Very effective

25

11

16

15

12

18

Quite effective

39

11

33

33

40

34

Not very effective

20

22

27

30

16

23

Not effective

8

11

6

15

16

10

Don't know

8

44

18

7

16

16

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

n=198.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.4 Perceived change in governance and leadership, by state (%)

 

WA

SA

NT

Qld

NSW

Total

Governance

 

Better

21

14

20

36

11

21

About the same

55

46

43

43

69

51

Worse

16

21

11

7

8

13

Don't know/not applicable

8

18

26

14

11

16

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

Leadership

 

Better

25

18

16

26

8

20

About the same

51

43

40

48

67

48

Worse

16

21

21

10

14

17

Don't know/not applicable

8

18

23

17

11

15

Total

100

100

100

100

100

100

               

n=265-267.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.5 Proportion of respondents that view RSD as beneficial for the community, by organisation type (%) *

 

Federal Government Organisation

State/Territory Government Organisation

Local Government Organisation

Non-Government Organisation

Yes

90

66

40

65

No

10

34

60

35

* Excludes don’t know responses.

n=10-56.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.6 Perceptions of the effectiveness of a range of elements of RSD, by resident and visiting service providers (%)

 

Resident service providers

Visiting service providers

How effective have ROCs been in helping the coordination of service delivery?

Very effective

10

11

Quite effective

31

42

Not very effective

16

29

Not effective

14

9

Don't know

30

9

How effective have GECs/GBMs/GECs/IEOs and RSD Cords been in helping the coordination of service delivery?

Very effective

20

23

Quite effective

24

38

Not very effective

18

20

Not effective

11

9

Don't know

27

11

How effective have GECs/GBMs/GECs/IEOs and RSD Cords been in helping community engagement?

Very effective

24

22

Quite effective

21

43

Not very effective

20

16

Not effective

11

5

Don't know

24

13

How effective have Indigenous Engagement Officers been in helping community engagement?

Very effective

32

29

Quite effective

18

34

Not very effective

18

20

Not effective

13

4

Don't know

20

13

How effective has the Local Implementation Plan process been in helping community engagement?

Very effective

12

14

Quite effective

31

29

Not very effective

27

31

Not effective

11

12

Don't know

20

13

How effective have Local References Groups been in helping community engagement?

Very effective

20

16

Quite effective

29

37

Not very effective

18

27

Not effective

15

5

Don't know

18

14

n=81-112.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.7 Perceptions of change in a range of outcomes areas, by RSD and non-RSD serviceproviders (%)

Outcome area

RSD

Non-RSD

Local people in paid jobs

More

28

26

About the same

42

44

Less

14

16

Don't know/Not applicable

16

14

Adults studying

More

17

22

About the same

38

48

Less

15

8

Don't know/Not applicable

30

22

Children going to school

More

23

42

About the same

38

38

Less

15

6

Don't know/Not applicable

25

14

High school kids going to boarding school

More

20

20

About the same

39

50

Less

5

6

Don't know/Not applicable

36

24

Families managing their money well

More

7

10

About the same

43

66

Less

19

8

Don't know/Not applicable

30

16

Looking after houses

More

17

26

About the same

48

56

Less

14

10

Don't know/Not applicable

22

8

Drinking alcohol/grog

More

25

24

About the same

44

44

Less

12

20

Don't know/Not applicable

19

12

Smoking marijuana/gunja

More

33

38

About the same

39

42

Less

7

10

Don't know/Not applicable

21

10

Gambling

More

25

30

About the same

47

46

Less

5

6

Don't know/Not applicable

22

18

Fighting in families

More

22

22

About the same

46

46

Less

12

24

Don't know/Not applicable

20

8

Fighting between families

More

22

22

About the same

46

46

Less

12

24

Don't know/Not applicable

20

8

Managing unsafe or feral animals

More

18

20

About the same

34

42

Less

16

16

Don't know/Not applicable

32

22

n=191-195, n=50 non-RSD.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

Table M.8 Perceived availability of services (%)

Service

Service is based in the community

Service is available through a visiting or outreach service

Service is not available

Don't know

Medical centre/health clinic

96

2

0

2

Aged care services

79

8

4

9

Mental health services

27

55

5

13

Drug and alcohol service

44

37

8

11

Aboriginal legal service

21

57

5

17

Safe house

61

3

23

13

Family and domestic violence service

38

34

11

17

Child welfare/protection services

48

40

3

9

Police

82

14

2

1

Aboriginal community police

33

8

41

18

Sobering up shelter/detox centre

14

5

65

16

Night patrols

49

2

33

15

Arts and cultural centre

71

1

21

7

Youth services

74

10

8

9

Centrelink

70

23

2

5

General store

99

0

0

1

Job Services Australia

45

31

5

18

Primary school

99

0

0

1

Childcare centre

78

0

11

11

Church

92

1

1

6

Men’s centre

38

3

37

22

Women’s centre

48

3

31

18

n=268-278.

Source: RSD Service Provider Survey.

M.2 Service provider survey

The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery (NPA RSD) aims to improve remote service delivery in terms of access, standards, coordination and community engagement.

The NPA RSD was signed off in 2009 and it is now time to reflect on how it has gone and what has been achieved. The first stage of the evaluation involves a number of research activities, including this survey and consultations with key stakeholders. The four key questions guiding the evaluation arewhether:

· Access to and delivery of services has improved?

· The capacity of community and government to engage with one another has improved?

· Have there been changes that contribute to Closing the Gap objectives?

· What have we learnt that can inform remote service delivery?

More information on the evaluation is provided in the separate Fact Sheet on the evaluation sent in the email. A Participant Information Sheet for the service provider survey is to help you decide whether you want to be involved.

It is important to seek the views of local service providers to find out whether they think service delivery in the remote communities has changed and whether these changes are linked to Remote Service Delivery (RSD).

In this survey, we are seeking the views of service providers that work in remote communities (both RSD and non-RSD communities) across a range of sectors in the government and non-government sectors: police, justice, health, community services, education, employment and more.

The results from this online survey will be summarised in a stand-alone report. Subject to Ministerial approval, this report or a summary will be provided to key stakeholder groups, including local service providers.

This research is being funded by the Australian Government and supported by the relevant state and territory governments.

Participation in this survey is voluntary. Your answers will be completely confidential.

The survey should take about 15 to 30 minutes to complete.

Note: If you have any concerns or complaints regarding the ethical conduct of this online survey, you should contact:

Human Research Ethics Secretariat at the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs by telephone on FREECALL 1800 252 604, by email to ethics.committee@fahcsia.gov.au or by writing to the FaHCSIA Human Research Ethics Secretariat, Research and Analysis Branch, PO Box 7576, Canberra Business Centre, 2610.

I have read the Participant Information sheet and understand what participating in this online survey involves. I am aware that I do not need to complete the survey if I do not wish to.

Introduction

In this survey we would like you to answer questions about service provision in a particular community. Please answer these questions about the community you have worked with the most over the last 12 months.

1. Which state or territory do you reside in?

WA

SA

NT

Qld

NSW

2. Which community will you be answering questions about?

________________________________

3. How long have you worked in this community?

Less than one year

One to less than two years

Two to less than three years

Three to less than four years

Five or more years

4. Do you reside in the community?

Yes

No

5. If no, how frequently did you visit the community in the past year?

At least once a week

At least once a fortnight

At least once a month

At least once every six months

At least once in the year

As required

6. If no, how many days in total have you spent in the community in the past year?

Less than 10 days

Between 10 and 30 days

Between 30 and 60 days

More than 60 days

7. What sector do you work in?

Health

Education

Policing

Employment

Justice and legal

Welfare

Housing

Early childhood

Single Government Interface (e.g. GEC/GBM’s, IEO’s)

Municipal services

Aboriginal community organisations

Natural resource management (e.g. Rangers)

Other (please specify)

8. How big an issue is recruiting appropriately skilled or experienced staff for your service in thiscommunity?

Big

Neither big nor small

Small

Not an issue

Don’t know

9. How big an issue is staff retention for your service in this community?

Big

Neither big nor small

Small

Not an issue

Don’t know

Current availability of services

This section will ask you questions about the range of services available in your community.

10. Are the following services available in the community (either resident in the community, or available to the community through visiting or outreach services)?

 

Yes, service based in the community

Yes, a visiting or outreach service

No

Don’t know

Medical centre/health clinic

 

 

 

 

Aged care services

 

 

 

 

Mental health services

 

 

 

 

Drug and alcohol service

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal legal service

 

 

 

 

Safe house

 

 

 

 

Family and domestic violence service

 

 

 

 

Child welfare/protection services

 

 

 

 

Police

 

 

 

 

Aboriginal community police

 

 

 

 

Sobering up shelter/detox centre

 

 

 

 

Night patrols

 

 

 

 

Arts and cultural centre

 

 

 

 

Youth services

 

 

 

 

Centrelink

 

 

 

 

General store

 

 

 

 

Job Services Australia

 

 

 

 

Primary school

 

 

 

 

Childcare centre

 

 

 

 

Church

 

 

 

 

Men’s centre

 

 

 

 

Women’s centre

 

 

 

 

Other: please specify service and its availability:

 

 

 

 

 

Remote Service Delivery

This section will ask questions about your experiences of Remote Service Delivery (RSD) in yourcommunity.

11. How important do you think the following objectives are to reforms in Remote Service Delivery (RSD)?

 

Very important

Quite important

Not very important

Not important

Don’t know

Improving services

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing services

 

 

 

 

 

Individuals being more responsible

 

 

 

 

 

Families being more responsible

 

 

 

 

 

Giving local people more control

 

 

 

 

 

Giving local people more opportunities

 

 

 

 

 

Re-establishing Indigenous authority

 

 

 

 

 

Increasing investment in the region

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. Does your organisation demonstrate a commitment to:

 

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

Improved access to services?

 

 

 

 

 

Improved delivery of services?

 

 

 

 

 

Community capacity to engage with services?

 

 

 

 

 

Government capacity to engage with services?

 

 

 

 

 

 

13. Do other organisations involved in delivering services in the local community demonstrate a commitment to:

 

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

Improved access to services?

 

 

 

 

 

Improved delivery of services?

 

 

 

 

 

Community capacity to engage with services?

 

 

 

 

 

Government capacity to engage with services?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service provision - coordination and communication

This section is about the coordination and communication issues around local services provision.

14. Are the roles and responsibilities of my organisation in delivering services are clear?

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

15. Are the roles and responsibilities of other organisations in delivering services are clear?

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

16. Do you think communication between local service providers is generally effective?

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

17. Do you think relevant information is shared openly between local service providers?

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

18. Has the number of services provided in the local community changed in the past three years?

Increased

About the same

Decreased

Don’t know

19. Has the way your organisation worked with other service providers in the local community changed in the past three years?

Yes

No

Don’t know

Please describe: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Service provision – community engagement

This section will ask questions about service provision in relation to community engagement.

20. How often do organisations involved in delivering services work collaboratively with the local community?

Never

Some of the time

Most of the time

Always

Don’t know

21. How often does your service do the following in the local community?

 

Often

Occasionally

Rarely

Never

Don’t know

Not applicable

 

 

 

 

 

Consult with local leaders

 

 

 

 

 

Consult with local community members

 

 

 

 

 

Attend community meetings

 

 

 

 

 

Use a local Indigenous interpreter

 

 

 

 

 

Attend meetings of a local reference group

 

 

 

 

 

Attend community meetings

 

 

 

 

 

Use a local Indigenous interpreter

 

 

 

 

 

Attend meetings of a local reference group

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

22. Has the way your service engages with the local community changed in the past three years?

Yes

No

Don’t know

Please describe: __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

23. What barriers inhibit the ability to improve service delivery in this community? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

24. What enablers or factors help with improving service delivery in this community? __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

25. Is there anything else you would like to say about service delivery in the local community?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Changes in key outcome areas - education, employment, health, and safety

This section will ask you questions about key areas of your life.

26. Do you think any of the following have changed in the local community in the past three years?

 

More

About the same

Less

Don’t know/Not applicable (not around long enough to say)

Local people in paid jobs

 

 

 

 

Adults studying

 

 

 

 

Children going to school

 

 

 

 

High school kids going to boarding school

 

 

 

 

Families managing their money well

 

 

 

 

Looking after houses

 

 

 

 

Drinking alcohol/grog

 

 

 

 

Smoking marijuana/gunja

 

 

 

 

Gambling

 

 

 

 

Fighting in families

 

 

 

 

Fighting between families

 

 

 

 

Managing unsafe or feral animals

 

 

 

 

Vandalism or damage to property

 

 

 

 

 

27. Have there been changes in the number of local Indigenous people employed by your service in the past three years?

More

About the same

Less

Don’t know

28. Has governance and leadership changed in the local community in the past three years?

 

Better

About the same

Worse

Don’t know/Not applicable (not around long enough to say)

Governance

 

 

 

 

Leadership

 

 

 

 

 

29. In the local community, have the following aspects of service delivery changed in the past three years?

 

Better

About the same

Worse

Don’t know/Not applicable (not around long enough to say)

Accessibility

 

 

 

 

Accountability

 

 

 

 

Standards

 

 

 

 

Coordination of services

 

 

 

 

Infrastructure e.g. accommodation

 

 

 

 

 

30. Are there other changes you would like to describe? ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

31. Are you aware of the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery (RSD)?

Yes

No

Don’t know

32. Are you answering questions about a Remote Service Delivery (RSD) community?

Yes, go to next question

No, skip to q.36

Don’t know, skip to q.36

33. How effective are the following initiatives in helping the coordination of service delivery?

 

Very effective

Quite effective

Not very effective

Not effective

Don’t know

Regional operational centres

 

 

 

 

 

GECs/GBMs/GECOs/RSD Coordinators and IEOs

 

 

 

 

 

 

34. How effective are the following initiatives in helping community engagement?

 

Very effective

Quite effective

Not very effective

Not effective

Don’t know

GECs/GBMs/GECOs/RSD Coordinators and IEOs

 

 

 

 

 

Indigenous Engagement Officers

 

 

 

 

 

Local Implementation Plans process

 

 

 

 

 

Local Reference Groups

 

 

 

 

 

 

35. How effective has Local Implementation Plan (LIPs) been in?

 

Very effective

Quite effective

Not very effective

Not effective

Don’t know

Identifying local community priorities

 

 

 

 

 

Generating change in local communities

 

 

 

 

 

Increased government accountability to local communities

 

 

 

 

 

Improved infrastructure

 

 

 

 

 

 

36. Do you think the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) has been beneficial for this community?

Yes

No

Don’t know

37. What could be changed to better support the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) or similar reform measures in the future?

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Demographics

We are going to ask you questions about yourself.

38. Are you?

Female

Male

39. Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin?

No

Yes, Aboriginal

Yes, Torres Strait Islander

Yes, both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

40. In total, how long have you worked in roles where you provide services for people in Indigenous remote communities?

Less than 12 months

One to less than 3 years

Three to less than 5 years

Five or more years

Don’t know/Don’t want to say

41. Do you currently work for a government organisation, a non-government organisation, or a private business?

Federal government organisation

State/Territory government organisation

Local government organisation

Non-government organisation

Private business

Don’t know

 

Thank you for your time and for answering these questions.

 

Appendix N Outcomes

Compiled by the Evidence and Evaluation Branch, with crime data analysis by AIC and health data analysis by AIHW.

N.1 Student enrolment and attendance

Table N.1 Student enrolment and attendance rates in RSD communities by state, educationlevel and year

State

Year

Primary school

Secondary school

   

Enrolment number

Average attendance rate %

Enrolment

number

Average attendance rate %

New South Wales

all years

 

81.6

 

67.4

 

2006

174

72.7

165

69.2

 

2007

171

73.6

194

64.4

 

2008

324

81.3

184

67.3

 

2009

303

79.6

151

65.9

 

2010

313

84.4

166

73.2

 

2011

332

86.0

184

67.0

 

2012

345

85.6

155

64.8

Western Australia

all years

 

71.8

 

47.1

 

2010

611

74.2

218

51.6

 

2011

650

72.6

222

48.3

 

2012

629

68.8

258

42.2

Northern Territory

all years

 

55.7

 

49.0

 

2006

2,833

59.0

1,127

57.9

 

2007

3,014

59.0

1,110

51.2

 

2008

2,836

56.3

1,497

48.8

 

2009

2,869

56.6

1,340

50.4

 

2010

2,952

51.5

1,439

45.0

 

2011

3,019

53.3

1,365

45.7

 

2012

2,987

54.5

1,395

46.6

Queensland - combined*

all years

 

63.4

 

 

 

2008

970

55.4

 

 

 

2009

1,028

63.2

 

 

 

2010

960

67.8

 

 

 

2011

1,062

67.4

 

 

 

2012

961

63.0

 

 

South Australia

all years

 

71.9

 

59.4

 

2006

115

80.7

38

67.8

 

2007

97

77.2

73

67.0

 

2008

92

71.2

71

65.6

 

2009

88

72.2

83

59.3

 

2010

92

71.6

60

57.8

 

2011

108

68.3

75

48.2

 

2012

115

62.6

60

53.5

* Qld figures are combined for primary and secondary school.

Source: compiled from annual school level attendance data provided by the state and territory jurisdictions.

N.2 Achievements in reading, writing and numeracy

N.2.1 Statistical testing of change over time

The results of two separate but related statistical tests are reported below.

Question 1: Is there a common linear time trend across the 29 communities over 2008 to 2012 (regression analyses)

This is answered by linear regression analyses (fitting a straight line to the school level data of the form y = b x time + a) and testing whether the estimated slope coefficient (b) is significantly positive ornegative.

Results

In none of the four regression models estimated (Year 3 and Year 5 and for the reading and numeracy NAPLAN tests) was there a significant average slope coefficient. This result indicates that a common time trend between 2008 and 2012 did not explain any of the variation in the observed NAPLAN test scores in reading and numeracy tests in this period.

Table N.2 summarises the results from the linear regression analyses for estimating a common time trend across all schools in the 29 RSD communities for the proportion who are at or above NMS. Itreports the estimated value of the time trend (the slope coefficient) and the R-Squared value that reflects the goodness of fit of the model.

The R-Squared values are very low (all below 0.02). Since there is only one explanatory variable in these regressions (the time trend), a poor model fit (very low R-Squared coefficient) is equivalent to finding that the estimated slope coefficient on the time trend variable is not significantly different from zero. The p-values reported for the estimated slope coefficients indeed verify this inference – none of the reported p-values are below 0.05, which would make the estimated slope coefficient significantly different from zero within a 95 per cent confidence interval.

Table N.2 Time trend on NAPLAN NMS proportion for all RSD schools

NAPLAN domains

slope coefficient

p value

R-Squared

Year 3 reading

2.61

0.172

0.01

Year 3 numeracy

1.16

0.548

0.00

Year 5 reading

1.92

0.269

0.01

Year 5 numeracy

-1.61

0.382

0.01

 

In summary, the regression analyses find no statistically significant changes in the RSD schools in the proportion of students meeting national minimum standards in reading and numeracy from 2008 to 2012. This is not surprising given the high degree of volatility in the data that reflects small studentnumbers.

Question 2: Are there statistically significant changes across all years and also between any two year period over the five years of NAPLAN data from 2008 to 2012 (ANOVA)

ANOVA assumes no directionality in the data; rather it compares the individual values with the group average value (for a specific calendar year). If the variance around the group averages is low, then the grouping procedure has reduced the overall variance compared to the variance of the ungrouped data. So we can infer that the data for the separate groups come from different data generating processes (populations) which have significant differences among them. Alternatively, if the variance around the group means is high, then grouping has not reduced the overall variance by much. Thisleads to the conclusion that the NAPLAN scores for the entire time period come from a common population exhibiting only random variation across the years with no systematic differences.

Results

Table N.3 below reports the p-values for the general effect of grouping by years. None of the reported p-values are significant. This indicates that grouping by calendar years does not help to explain a significant part of the total variation observed across all RSD schools in the proportion of students meeting national minimum standards in any of the four NAPLAN tests considered – Year 3 and 5 Reading and Numeracy.

Table N.3 ANOVA results on effects of grouping by calendar years on the proportion of student at or able NMS for all RSD schools

NAPLAN domains

p value

Year 3 reading

0.091

Year 3 numeracy

0.153

Year 5 reading

0.451

Year 5 numeracy

0.671

 

Additional ANOVA tests (whose results are not presented in this section) were also done to test if any significant differences occurred between any pair of calendar years between 2008 and 2012. Again for the specific NAPLAN tests selected – Years 3 and 5 Reading and Numeracy – there are no significant differences between any two years in this period in the performance of students averaged across all of the RSD schools with data. So all of the observed variations in the NAPLAN proportions at or above NMS for RSD schools in these tests can be attributed to random variations across the calendar years.

In summary, the ANOVA analysis is quite consistent with the regression analysis.[128] Lacking directionality, the ANOVA test is a less stringent test than linear regression. Even with the significant result on a single pairing of years for the Year 3 tests, the results look much like random variations. Both tests suggest that, across the RSD schools as a whole, there have been no statistically significant changes in the distribution of the proportion of students at or above the national minimum standard in the NAPLAN results from 2008 to 2012.

Caveats

The ANOVA and regression analyses above were carried out by assigning equal weights for every datum point across all schools for a given test domain and year level. This ignores differences in school size that lead to variations in the number of students who sit for a specific NAPLAN test across the RSD schools and also across the calendar year. Ideally one should adjust for differences in the size of the tested cohort across schools and calendar years through appropriate weighting in carrying out the statistical analyses.

We cannot make these adjustments since we do not have data for student numbers by year level by school as these data are not available on the MySchool website. However, as indicated in Chapter 7 Table 7.6, where Year 3 enrolment in 2009 is reported from the RSD Baseline Reports, there is only limited variation in school size across the RSD communities (Year 3 enrolment in 2009 ranged from 5to 60 students), so using unweighted data is unlikely to have a major impact on our results. This would be a greater concern if there were large differences in school size such as one school having 2,000 students with another school only having 20 students.[129]

Participation in NAPLAN

The MySchool website provides data on the percentage of students who participate every year on specific NAPLAN tests conducted in each school. A high or increasing level of participation in NAPLAN, especially in schools in the RSD communities with a high proportion of Indigenous students, may itself be a positive outcome to note. But it is also important to keep track of changes in the participation rate in NAPLAN tests to understand the pattern of NAPLAN results over time. Largevariations in the participation rate, especially for schools where enrolments are small, can affect trends in the NAPLAN tests.

The NAPLAN participation data for students in each test domain and grade are classified in four categories (i) assessed, (ii) exempt from test, (iii) absent from test, and (iv) withdrawn from test.

The first two categories (assessed and exempt) together represent the proportion of students who are deemed to have participated in the test, even though a test score is not available for exempt students. (However, the students exempted from a test are assessed as not meeting the national minimum standard in that test).

In looking at the MySchool data for individual schools in the RSD communities, the proportion of students who are exempt for specific NAPLAN tests is quite low. Many schools do no report any exempt students, and where exemptions occur, most of the instances are only a few percentage points of total enrolment. Hence this sub-section focuses on the trends in the percentage of student who are in the first category only (assessed) as a good direct measure of students who have actually taken a specific NAPLAN test.

Table N.4 presents yearly data for each school in the RSD communities on the percentage of students assessed in a specific illustrative NAPLAN test category – Year 5 Numeracy. The schools have been listed by state and territory they are located in. However since data on the actual number of students who were assessed in a particular NAPLAN test are not available on MySchool, we cannot compute the average assessed or participation rates for each jurisdiction, or for all 29 RSD communities. Simple averages computed across schools without taking account of the difference in the number of students would be misleading.

Table N.4 shows that there is no uniformity in the proportion of students who were assessed for the NAPLAN Year 5 Numeracy test between 2008 and 2012. In each calendar year there are large variations across these schools, and over time there also are very different patterns of changes.

In 2012 the proportion of students assessed in this NAPLAN test varied from a low 39 per cent in Maningrida School to 100 per cent in Sacred Heart School, Beagle Bay.

A few schools record a consistently high assessment rate throughout this period - such as StJoseph’s School (Walgett) and Walgett Community College which have over 85 per cent assessment in each year.

There are also schools with consistently low assessment rates during the entire period. Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr School in Wadeye has assessment rates consistently below 65percent.

In terms of patterns in changes over time, large increases in the proportion assessed have occurred in schools such as Milingimbi School where the proportion assessed increased dramatically from 22per cent in 2008 to 87 per cent in 2012. There was a large increase also in Wilcannia Central School where the proportion assessed increased from 38 per cent in 2008 to 89 per cent in 2012. There are also schools where the reverse has happened – with large decreases in the proportion assessed, such as in Doomadgee State School, where the proportion of students assessed fell from 77 per cent in 2008 to 55 per cent in 2012.

Table N.4 Proportion of students assessed in NAPLAN Year 5 Numeracy in RSD schools from 2008 to 2012

State

School

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2008–12

change in

% points

NSW

St Joseph's School, Walgett

93%

100%

90%

100%

95%

2%

 

Walgett Community College - Primary School

94%

87%

93%

100%

93%

-1%

 

Wilcannia Central School

38%

50%

na

73%

89%

51%

NT

Angurugu School

71%

79%

60%

52%

66%

-5%

 

Shepherdson College, Galiwinku

73%

71%

57%

71%

70%

-3%

 

Gapuwiyak School

58%

83%

65%

68%

74%

16%

 

Gunbalanya School

42%

80%

39%

60%

57%

15%

 

Ntaria School

na

100%

80%

89%

67%

na

 

Lajamanu School

47%

100%

na

56%

43%

-4%

 

Maningrida School

56%

89%

81%

39%

39%

-17%

 

Milingimbi School

22%

92%

71%

53%

87%

65%

 

Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic Primary School, Nguiu

78%

100%

73%

60%

70%

-8%

 

Ngukurr School

78%

100%

90%

89%

66%

-12%

 

Numbulwar School

na

100%

85%

63%

93%

na

 

Alyarrmandumanja Umbakumba School

na

63%

na

100%

60%

na

 

Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr CatholicCollege, Wadeye

61%

63%

46%

46%

45%

-16%

 

Yirrkala Homeland School

100%

100%

78%

82%

90%

-10%

 

Yirrkala School

65%

94%

86%

76%

na

na

 

Yuendumu School

50%

93%

23%

44%

43%

-7%

Qld

Western Cape College, Aurukun

80%

86%

80%

80%

88%

8%

 

Coen Campus of CYAAA

na

na

na

na

na

na

 

Doomadgee State School

77%

69%

72%

44%

55%

-22%

 

Hopevale Campus of CYAAA

86%

92%

75%

79%

na

na

 

Mornington Island State School

72%

64%

59%

88%

70%

-2%

SA

Amata Anangu School

71%

na

na

89%

na

na

 

Mimili Anangu School

na

na

na

na

na

na

WA

One Arm Point Remote Community School, Ardyaloon

86%

100%

71%

40%

88%

2%

 

Sacred Heart School, Beagle Bay

86%

91%

67%

na

100%

14%

 

Fitzroy Valley District High School, Fitzroy Crossing

47%

38%

75%

62%

93%

46%

 

Ngalapita Remote Community School, FitzroyCrossing

na

na

na

na

na

na

 

Yakanarra Community School, Fitzroy Crossing

na

71%

na

na

na

na

 

Yiyili Aboriginal Community School, Halls Creek

na

56%

na

63%

na

na

 

Halls Creek District High School

56%

59%

62%

73%

58%

2%

* na indicates no data available.

Source: My School and additional data provided by ACARA. Revised NT data were provided by DoE, NTG.

Some schools show a very volatile pattern of changes in the proportion of students assessed over time, with large increases as well as large decreases between years, such as for Maningrida School.

Overall, there is no clear pattern in the assessment rate of students in the NAPLAN Year 5 Numeracy test. Comparing changes only between 2008 and 2012, there are more schools where the assessment percentage has decreased (12) than where it has increased (10).

Comparison of the proportion of students assessed in Year 5 Numeracy with the Year 5 Reading test showed that a consistently higher proportion of students are assessed in the NAPLAN Reading test. Among the RSD community schools with comparable data, the proportion of students assessed in Year 5 Reading was greater than or equal to the proportion assessed in Year 5 Numeracy in a vast majority of the RSD community schools (20 out of 26 schools in 2011, and in 18 out of 23 schools in2012).

N.3 Welfare dependence – Income Support and CDEP Wages recipients

Table N.5 Income support payments and CDEP Wages recipient totals by RSD community – RSD parent communities, all people, 2009 to 2012

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

Angurugu

52

342

382

-

>375

406

-

>350

376

-

>350

386

Umbakumba

44

161

194

-

>160

185

-

>160

191

-

>160

179

Amata

-

>100

136

-

>135

158

50

199

249

30

210

240

Aurukun

121

317

429

39

465

473

35

444

479

-

>460

484

Beagle Bay

-

>60

81

-

>60

79

-

>90

127

-

>100

133

One Arm Point

-

>60

84

-

>80

96

-

>110

130

-

>80

102

Coen

51

88

134

-

>75

101

-

>75

102

-

>100

120

Doomadgee

181

281

445

72

346

367

61

393

454

24

370

394

Fitzroy Crossing

794

225

1,003

377

273

633

50

303

353

53

298

351

Galiwinku

402

497

820

251

612

759

144

705

849

96

726

822

Gapuwiyak

38

320

343

33

367

369

32

365

397

20

373

393

Halls Creek

330

452

755

143

470

578

41

556

597

32

558

590

Hermannsburg

82

191

254

51

202

238

47

232

279

38

271

309

Hope Vale

103

323

412

37

374

385

-

>325

353

-

>300

325

Gunbalanya

-

>300

326

-

>350

380

67

411

478

44

442

486

Lajamanu

-

>250

277

-

>250

231

-

>290

314

-

>310

334

Maningrida

240

744

898

197

778

905

197

812

1,009

177

865

1,042

Milingimbi

54

498

541

39

549

553

-

>540

559

-

>500

530

Mimili

-

>90

110

-

>100

120

-

>110

134

-

>130

151

Mornington island

149

261

396

41

389

396

29

398

427

-

>375

396

Mossman Gorge

-

>75

98

-

>50

73

-

>50

77

-

>50

66

Wurrumiyanga

60

482

493

32

520

523

81

557

638

34

608

642

Ngukurr

35

338

345

-

>350

389

-

>400

451

-

>400

423

Yirrkala

66

188

239

50

180

213

41

200

241

32

233

265

Numbulwar

-

>275

299

-

>350

364

-

>325

348

-

>320

338

Wadeye

232

617

787

108

704

751

31

775

806

-

>825

847

Walgett

60

780

830

28

808

815

-

>775

795

-

>740

757

Wilcannia

41

256

287

25

249

263

-

>225

240

-

>250

277

Yuendumu

-

>275

298

-

>310

337

-

>350

367

-

>300

320

Total

3,196

9,068

11,696

1,610

10,269

11,140

1,048

10,772

11,820

689

11,013

11,702

* Total has been adjusted to account for double counting of customer IDs.

Values less than 20 are not directly reported and adjustments are made to related counts to prevent the less than 20 values from being recovered.

Source: Tabulations of DEEWR Bluebook and CDEP administrative data by FaHCSIA.

Table N.6 Income support payments and CDEP Wages recipient totals by RSD community – parent communities, only people aged 15-64, 2009 to 2012

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

 

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

CDEP Wages

Income support payments

Adjusted Total*

Angurugu

52

332

372

-

>375

395

-

>350

365

-

>350

372

Umbakumba

43

158

190

-

>150

179

-

>165

185

-

>150

171

Amata

-

>100

125

-

>125

143

50

178

228

30

192

222

Aurukun

116

282

390

39

425

433

35

406

441

-

>420

441

Beagle Bay

-

>50

70

-

>50

69

-

>95

116

-

>100

121

One Arm Point

-

>50

71

-

>65

85

-

>100

116

-

>70

88

Coen

49

66

110

-

>50

79

-

>50

81

-

>75

100

Doomadgee

177

259

419

70

321

341

61

366

427

24

342

366

Fitzroy Crossing

788

189

961

377

230

590

50

264

314

52

264

316

Galiwinku

393

444

760

246

563

707

144

656

800

96

675

771

Gapuwiyak

38

299

322

33

349

351

32

352

384

20

363

383

Halls Creek

325

383

682

143

408

516

41

486

527

31

484

515

Hermannsburg

82

169

232

51

181

217

47

214

261

38

249

287

Hope Vale

103

295

384

37

332

343

-

>300

324

-

>275

294

Gunbalanya

-

>275

302

-

>325

355

67

389

456

44

420

464

Lajamanu

-

>225

247

-

>175

203

-

>250

287

-

>275

306

Maningrida

240

706

860

196

749

875

197

782

979

177

833

1,010

Milingimbi

52

473

514

38

527

531

-

>500

535

-

>475

500

Mimili

-

>80

102

-

>100

113

-

>100

128

-

>125

146

Mornington island

141

223

353

41

349

356

28

353

381

-

>325

349

Mossman gorge

-

>75

96

-

>50

71

-

>50

74

-

>45

63

Wurrumiyanga

60

456

467

32

500

503

81

535

616

34

580

614

Ngukurr

35

324

331

-

>350

374

-

>410

437

-

>380

406

Yirrkala

66

163

214

50

162

195

41

181

222

32

217

249

Numbulwar

-

>250

273

-

>310

334

-

>300

319

-

>280

305

Wadeye

227

581

747

107

667

713

30

731

761

-

>790

808

Walgett

60

569

619

28

595

602

-

>575

599

-

>560

578

Wilcannia

41

206

237

25

198

212

-

>175

191

-

>200

226

Yuendumu

-

>250

264

-

>280

303

-

>310

335

-

>275

292

Total

3,149

8,123

10,714

1,600

9,322

10,188

1,044

9,845

10,889

684

10,079

10,763

* Total has been adjusted to account for double counting of customer IDs.

Values less than 20 are not directly reported and adjustments are made to related counts to prevent the less than 20 values from being recovered.

Source: FaHCSIA tabulations of DEEWR Bluebook and CDEP administrative data by FaHCSIA.

N.4 Job Services Australia in RSD Communities

N.4.1 New South Wales

· As at 31 March 2013, there were 422 job seekers in NSW RSD communities and their surrounding areas on the JSA caseload (32% of job seekers in remote NSW and Walgett). Between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, the overall JSA Active caseload in the NSW RSD communities decreased by about 1 per cent. There was a larger general decline in JSA caseloads for non-RSD remote in NSW during the period 2010 to 2012 (although the caseload in both RSD and non-RSD increased between 2012 and 2013).

· In the three years between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, in the RSD communities in NSW:

- there were 1,310 commencements in JSA (around 28.4% of commencements by job seekers in remote NSW and Walgett). Ofthese, 31percent were in the first year (1April 2010 – 31 March 2011), 34 per cent were in the second year (1April2011 – 31March2012), and 35percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31March2013)

- JSA has recorded 608 job placements (around 34.6% of job placements for job seekers in remote NSW and Walgett). Of these, 39percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31 March 2011), 36 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March2012), and 25percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 267 13-week outcomes (around 28.6% of 13 week outcomes for job seekers in remote NSW and Walgett).

- JSA has recorded 158 26-week outcomes (around 27.8% of 26 week outcomes for job seekers in remote NSW and Walgett)

- the ratio of 13 week outcomes achieved over job placements was lower in the RSD communities (by around 14percentage points) than non-RSD NSW remote over the three years, although the ratio improved in these communities by around 23percentage points between 2010 and 2013, reaching parity with the non-RSD remote state total by end-March 2013.

Table N.7 JSA NSW RSD communities
 

1 April 2010 to

31 March 2011

1 April 2011 to

31 March 2012

1 April 2012 to

31 March 2013

Total

Walgett

 

 

 

 

Commencements

301

319

335

955

Job Placements

193

177

136

506

13 week outcomes

53

68

76

197

26 week outcomes

36

38

42

116

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

308

301

296

304

Wilcannia

 

 

 

 

Commencements

102

127

126

355

Job Placements

43

43

-

102

13 week outcomes

32

25

-

70

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

42

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

119

114

117

118

NSW RSD Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

403

446

461

1310

Job Placements

236

220

152

608

13 week outcomes

85

93

89

267

26 week outcomes

53

57

48

158

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

427

415

413

422

NSW Non-RSD Remote State Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

977

1128

1192

3297

Job Placements

395

431

321

1147

13 week outcomes

230

251

187

668

26 week outcomes

134

152

124

410

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

1001

875

833

878

N.4.2 Northern Territory

· As at 31 March 2013, there were 5,053 job seekers in Northern Territory RSD communities and their surrounding areas on the JSA caseload (39% of remote job seekers in NT). Between 1April2010 and 31 March 2013, the overall JSA Active caseload in the NT RSD communities decreased by about 6 per cent. This is consistent with the general decrease of around 11percent in JSA caseloads for non-RSD remote NT during the period 2010 to 2013.

· In the three years between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, in the RSD communities in NT:

- there were 10,256 commencements in JSA (around 24% of commencements by remote job seekers in the NT). Of these, 32percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31 March 2011), 34 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March 2012), and 34percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 2,475 job placements (around 29% of job placements for remote job seekers in the NT). Of these, 35percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31March 2011), 36 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March 2012), and 29percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 1,170 13-week outcomes (around 30% of 13 week outcomes for remote job seekers in the NT).

- JSA has recorded 614 26-week outcomes (around 28% of 26 week outcomes for remote job seekers in the NT)

- the ratio of 13 week outcomes achieved over job placements by end-March 2013 was slightly higher in the RSD communities (by about 3percentage points) than non-RSD remote NT, and the ratio improved in these communities by about 17percentagepoints between 2010 and 2013 – a greater improvement than NT remote as a whole (about 4percentage points).

Table N.8 JSA Northern Territory RSD communities
 

1 April 2010 to

31 March 2011

1 April 2011 to

31 March 2012

1 April 2012 to

31 March 2013

Total

Angurugu

 

 

 

 

Commencements

249

229

326

804

Job Placements

146

146

82

374

13 week outcomes

52

65

37

154

26 week outcomes

23

40

-

80

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

312

287

209

307

Galiwinku

 

 

 

 

Commencements

390

377

294

1061

Job Placements

155

116

50

321

13 week outcomes

60

65

35

160

26 week outcomes

26

43

23

92

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

639

522

582

599

Gapuwiyak

 

 

 

 

Commencements

151

127

169

447

Job Placements

-

-

38

65

13 week outcomes

0

-

-

20

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

305

266

256

256

Gunbalanya

 

 

 

 

Commencements

319

270

249

838

Job Placements

92

82

66

240

13 week outcomes

34

53

29

116

26 week outcomes

21

-

-

56

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

349

360

291

327

Hermannsburg

 

 

 

 

Commencements

118

155

141

414

Job Placements

26

45

30

101

13 week outcomes

-

-

30

46

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

267

235

234

273

Lajamanu

 

 

 

 

Commencements

188

198

187

573

Job Placements

28

34

35

97

13 week outcomes

-

21

-

45

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

24

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

208

168

170

163

Maningrida

 

 

 

 

Commencements

328

409

535

1272

Job Placements

103

149

86

338

13 week outcomes

37

50

30

117

26 week outcomes

-

21

27

57

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

850

789

848

831

Milingimbi

 

 

 

 

Commencements

129

173

153

455

Job Placements

-

20

44

83

13 week outcomes

-

-

28

41

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

373

309

291

316

Ngukurr

 

 

 

 

Commencements

315

300

339

954

Job Placements

59

42

77

178

13 week outcomes

20

38

50

108

26 week outcomes

-

-

32

59

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

292

296

268

301

Numbulwar

 

 

 

 

Commencements

165

146

174

485

Job Placements

32

25

37

94

13 week outcomes

-

-

23

58

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

37

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

258

195

185

189

Umbakumba

 

 

 

 

Commencements

79

60

76

215

Job Placements

29

43

26

98

13 week outcomes

24

-

23

64

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

20

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

142

128

108

126

Wadeye

 

 

 

 

Commencements

315

411

402

1128

Job Placements

78

89

68

235

13 week outcomes

38

29

38

105

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

56

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

445

457

585

573

Wurrumiyanga

 

 

 

 

Commencements

231

246

175

652

Job Placements

56

55

51

162

13 week outcomes

31

29

38

98

26 week outcomes

24

-

27

65

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

386

329

339

305

Yirrkala

 

 

 

 

Commencements

168

171

124

463

Job Placements

-

-

22

48

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

27

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

335

305

309

311

Yuendumu

 

 

 

 

Commencements

146

172

177

495

Job Placements

20

-

-

41

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

214

180

173

176

NT RSD Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

3291

3444

3521

10256

Job Placements

871

889

715

2475

13 week outcomes

341

431

398

1170

26 week outcomes

172

208

234

614

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

5375

4826

4848

5053

NT Non-RSD Remote State Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

10488

11105

10563

32156

Job Placements

1941

2137

2019

6097

13 week outcomes

840

895

952

2687

26 week outcomes

457

559

533

1549

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

8659

7585

7337

7733

N.4.3 Queensland

· As at 31 March 2013, there were 1,174 job seekers in Qld RSD communities and their surrounding areas on the JSA caseload (around 18% of the job seekers in remote Qld and Mossman Gorge). Between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, the overall JSA Active caseload in the Qld RSD communities decreased by about 14 per cent. This is similar to the general decrease of over 18percent in JSA caseloads in non-RSD remote Qld during the period 2010 to2012.

· In the three years between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, in the RSD communities in QLD:

- there were 3,465 commencements in JSA (around 12% of job seekers’ commencements in remote Qld and MossmanGorge). Ofthese, 30 per cent were in the first year (1April 2010 – 31 March 2011), 37 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March2012), and 33percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 1,300 job placements (around 16% of job placements for job seekers in remote Qld and MossmanGorge). Ofthese, 33percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31 March 2011), 35 per cent were in the second year (1April2011 – 31March2012), and 32percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 658 13-week outcomes (17% of 13 week outcomes for job seekers in remote Qld and MossmanGorge)

- JSA has recorded 409 26-week outcomes (around 17% of 26 week outcomes for job seekers in remote Qld and MossmanGorge)

- the ratio of 13 week outcomes achieved over job placements by end-March 2013 was slightly higher in the RSD communities (by around 2percentage points) than non-RSD Qld remote, and the ratio improved in these communities by around 12percentage points between 2010 and 2013. In non-RSD Qld remote, the ratio improved by almost 9percentage points.

Table N.9 JSA Queensland RSD communities
 

1 April 2010 to

31 March 2011

1 April 2011 to

31 March 2012

1 April 2012 to

31 March 2013

Total

Aurukun

 

 

 

 

Commencements

231

241

252

724

Job Placements

57

120

119

296

13 week outcomes

30

42

74

146

26 week outcomes

20

24

45

89

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

351

316

315

319

Coen

 

 

 

 

Commencements

68

140

89

297

Job Placements

20

27

56

103

13 week outcomes

-

-

28

53

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

35

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

66

59

77

78

Doomadgee

 

 

 

 

Commencements

207

392

316

915

Job Placements

132

91

70

293

13 week outcomes

68

47

42

157

26 week outcomes

37

29

20

86

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

362

323

337

286

Hope Vale

 

 

 

 

Commencements

228

209

188

625

Job Placements

97

115

91

303

13 week outcomes

51

59

71

181

26 week outcomes

36

40

47

123

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

258

259

208

205

Mornington Island

 

 

 

 

Commencements

262

267

262

791

Job Placements

106

102

69

277

13 week outcomes

46

28

35

109

26 week outcomes

31

-

20

68

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

274

276

253

256

Mossman Gorge

 

 

 

 

Commencements

37

37

39

113

Job Placements

-

-

-

28

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

49

41

29

30

Qld RSD Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

1033

1286

1146

3465

Job Placements

425

461

414

1300

13 week outcomes

210

194

254

658

26 week outcomes

137

117

155

409

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

1360

1274

1219

1174

Qld Non-RSD Remote State Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

8700

7994

7581

24275

Job Placements

2045

2639

1960

6644

13 week outcomes

911

1271

1043

3225

26 week outcomes

552

800

688

2040

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

6720

6208

5377

5480

N.4.4 South Australia

· As at 31 March 2013, there were 295 job seekers in South Australian RSD communities and their surrounding areas on the JSA caseload (13% of the remote job seekers in SA). Between 1April2010 and 31 March 2013, the overall JSA Active caseload in the SA RSD communities increased slightly by about 4 per cent. This compares to a general decrease of about 3 per cent in JSA caseloads for non-RSD remote SA during the period 2010 to 2012 (although the caseload increased slightly between 2012 and 2013). In the three years between 1April2010 and 31March 2013, in the RSD communities in SA:

- there were 432 commencements in JSA (almost 7% of remote job seekers’ commencements in SA). Of these, 29 per cent were in the first year (1April 2010 – 31 March 2011), 37 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March 2012), and 34percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013).

- JSA has recorded 118 job placements (around 5% of job placements for remote job seekers in SA). Of these, 43percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31March2011), 28 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March2012), and 29percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013).

- JSA has recorded 58 13-week outcomes in SA (around 5.1% of 13week outcomes for remote job seekers in SA).

- JSA has recorded 41 26-week outcomes in SA (around 5.8% of 26 week outcomes for remote job seekers in SA).

- the ratio of 13 week outcomes achieved over job placements by end-March 2013 was slightly higher in the RSD communities (by around 5percentage points) than in non-RSD remote SA. The ratio in the RSD communities was high in the years 2010 to 2011 and 2012 to 2013 but was quite low (less than half the ratio of the other years) in the year 2011 to 2012. This pattern is similar to, but more pronounced than, the pattern for non-RSD SA remote over this period.

Table N.10 JSA South Australia RSD communities
 

1 April 2010 to

31 March 2011

1 April 2011 to

31 March 2012

1 April 2012 to

31 March 2013

Total

Amata

 

 

 

 

Commencements

81

117

91

289

Job Placements

24

20

-

59

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

25

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

180

165

196

195

Mimili

 

 

 

 

Commencements

45

43

55

143

Job Placements

27

-

-

59

13 week outcomes

20

-

-

33

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

23

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

104

83

89

100

SA RSD Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

126

160

146

432

Job Placements

51

33

34

118

13 week outcomes

30

-

20

58

26 week outcomes

-

26

-

41

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

284

248

285

295

SA Non-RSD Remote State Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

2054

1971

2055

6080

Job Placements

775

952

716

2443

13 week outcomes

369

372

327

1068

26 week outcomes

223

266

181

670

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

2106

2089

1938

2036

N.4.5 Western Australia

· As at 31 March 2013, there were 1,432 job seekers in Western Australia RSD communities and their surrounding areas on the JSA caseload (16% of the remote job seekers in WA). Between 1April 2010 and 31 March 2013, the overall JSA Active caseload in the WA RSD communities decreased by about 10 per cent, similar to the seven per cent decrease in JSA caseloads in non-RSD remote WA during the period 2010 to 2012 (although the caseload increased between 2012 and 2013 in both the RSD communities and non-RSD remote WA).

· In the three years between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2013, in the RSD communities in WA:

- there were 2,945 commencements in JSA (around 9% of commencements for remote job seekers in WA). Of these, 34percent were in the first year (1April 2010 – 31March 2011), 34 per cent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March2012), and 32percent on the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 672 job placements (9% of job placements for remote job seekers in WA). Of these, 28percent were in the first year (1April2010 – 31March2011), 42percent were in the second year (1April 2011 – 31March2012), and 30percent in the third year (1April 2012 – 31 March 2013)

- JSA has recorded 302 13-week outcomes (9% of 13 week outcomes for remote job seekers in WA)

- JSA has recorded 165 26-week outcomes (around 8% of 26 week outcomes for remote job seekers in WA)

- the ratio of 13 week outcomes achieved over job placements by end-March 2013 was almost the same in the RSD communities as in non-RSD remote WA, and the ratio improved more in the RSD communities (by around 15percentage points) than in non-RSD remote WA (by around 3.5 percentage points) between 2010 and 2013.

Table N.11 JSA Western Australia RSD communities
 

1 April 2010 to

31 March 2011

1 April 2011 to

31 March 2012

1 April 2012 to

31 March 2013

Total

Beagle Bay

 

 

 

 

Commencements

79

54

57

190

Job Placements

-

-

22

52

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

28

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

20

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

118

94

81

83

Fitzroy Crossing

 

 

 

 

 

Commencements

358

387

306

1051

 

Job Placements

61

79

40

180

 

13 week outcomes

-

32

40

90

 

26 week outcomes

-

-

21

45

 

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

 

JSA caseload

645

596

585

653

 

Halls Creek

 

 

 

 

Commencements

499

513

522

1534

Job Placements

104

168

121

393

13 week outcomes

46

57

56

159

26 week outcomes

28

27

30

85

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

747

690

687

643

One Arm Point

 

 

 

 

Commencements

61

59

50

170

Job Placements

-

-

-

47

13 week outcomes

-

-

-

25

26 week outcomes

-

-

-

-

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

86

75

60

53

WA RSD Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

997

1013

935

2945

Job Placements

191

282

199

672

13 week outcomes

79

111

112

302

26 week outcomes

46

56

63

165

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

1596

1455

1413

1432

WA Non-RSD Remote State Total

 

 

 

 

Commencements

10231

9280

9028

28539

Job Placements

2254

2608

1884

6746

13 week outcomes

1010

1119

908

3037

26 week outcomes

614

659

576

1849

 

As at 31 March 2010

As at 31 March 2011

As at 31 March 2012

As at 31 March 2013

JSA caseload

8010

7382

7083

7428

                   

 


[1] See Chapter 2 Bilateral Plans are the key planning tool used by the BOMs to enable a coordinated approach to identifying government priorities at both the intra and inter government levels.

[2] ANAO, National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery: Audit Report No.43, 2011-12, p.65.

[3] See Chapter 2, whose names vary in each jurisdiction.

[4] The assessment considered regularity of meetings, seniority and attendance levels of participants, whether there is a working group structure, whether the agenda has a strategic focus rather than just reporting, and whether the community or local governments are involved. The assessment confirms the decline in meeting frequency and seniority of participation and indicates that the meetings in most jurisdictions tend to focus on reporting rather than strategic issues or actions. Two of the six boards currently have active working groups. Community or local government representatives have not generally participated in the boards, although one jurisdiction has changed its processes to incorporate representation from RSD communities. See http://www.cgris.gov.au.

[5] CGRIS, 7th report, p.6.

[6] … that the drop-off in the frequency of meetings and level of attendance ‘means the capacity and/or commitment to drive necessary changes is variable – both structural and at the local level – as is the capacity and/or commitment to hold governments accountable. CGRIS, 6th report, p.70.

[7] Ibid ANAO, Audit Report no.43 2011-12, p.52.

[8] See Chapter 5.

[9] www.cgris.gov.au/reports.

[10] See Chapter 5.

[11] Ibid.

[12] A similar effect was reported in the FaHCSIA Northern Territory Emergency Response Evaluation Report 2011, p.141.

[13] FaHCSIA, Cape York Welfare Reform Evaluation, 2012, p.59. The evaluation of the trial speculated on the role of the unique governance structure, which included an Indigenous NGO (the Cape York Institute) that actively sought to maintain the focus of government partners on the trial’s implementation.

[14] See Chapter 5.

[15] Regional Operations Centres are effectively driving activity at the local level, however the arrangements in place do not appear to be facilitating joined up and coordinated efforts across government(s) in part due to perceptions that Remote Service Delivery is an endeavour for the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs with the consequence that it is difficult to get agencies to take responsibility for progressing actions for which they are identified in the Local Implementation Plan as the responsible or lead agency. CGRIS, 7th report, p.6.

[16] ANAO, Audit Report no.43 2011-12, p.59.

[17] See Chapter 2. The position of GBM, is also known in some jurisdictions as RSD Coordinator (RSDC), Government Engagement and Coordination Officer (GECO) or Local Area Coordinator (LAC).

[18] In the service provider survey, 23% of service providers believed that the GBM position was ‘very effective’ in helping coordinate service delivery, 34% believed it was ‘quite effective’, while only 18% said it was ‘not very effective’ and 8% said ‘not effective’ (and 18% did not know). Chapter 6, Figure 6.2.

[19] CGRIS, 6th report, p.70 …the rapid introduction of the architecture on the ground consisting of the permanent joint government (state, Northern Territory and Australian government) presence at the community level is ‘contributing to developing long-term relationships, providing an accessible conduit between community and government and is generally representing a single government interface for communities. GBMs (or similar) provide local coordination and facilitation, strengthen links to community organisations and local networks and enhance local capacity building.

[20] Allen Consulting Group, Northern Territory Emergency Response: Review of Coordination and Engagement ResearchPaperII, unpublished report to FaHCSIA, October 2011, p.15. It should be noted, however, that 42% of the respondents to that survey were GBMs and 67%of respondents were Australian Government staff.

[21] See Chapter 5.

[22] Stakeholders emphasised networking and relationship management skills, as well as the ability to influence upwards echoing the outcome of NTER case studies (Allen Consulting Group, op cit, p.22), which found that ‘the level of coordination of services and inter-agency contact within a community was …largely dependent on the competency and motivation of individual GBMs, as opposed to adherence to protocols or procedures.

[23] This issue has been repeatedly highlighted by the Coordinator General. For example, in his second report, he states: ‘It is my strong view that insufficient attention has been paid to defining the skills required of Regional Operations Centre staff and Government Business Managers, the recruitment of suitably qualified officers, and training and professional development for existing staff’ (p.66). The need for better GBM training issue also emerged from survey results relating to the review of the coordination and engagement under the NTER (Ibid, p.49).

[24] See Chapter 5 for details about GBM recruitment…”As noted in the NTER evaluation, it was the intention to rotate GBMs regularly to help them maintain independence and objectivity when dealing with community”.

[25] CGRIS Jurisdictional Governance Assessments, 2013, available at www.cgris.gov.au.

[26] NPA RSD, Paragraph 12(d), 21(c), 21(d), 24(c)(vi).

[27] Further discussed under Section A.2 Government capacity to engage communities.

[28] For example, the WA bilateral plan described the LIP output as: ‘Develop Local Implementation Plans to deliver integrated services that meet the needs of Indigenous people in the priority locations’ (Milestone/Output 4.0). The NSW bilateral plan describes the role of the ROC as to ‘take a local whole of government approach to support the development and implementation of Local Implementation Plans’, which includes ‘coordinated delivery of resources and activities which address agreed priorities identified in local implementation plans’ (Paragraph 14).

[29] Allen Consulting Group, op cit, p.22.

[30] Ibid, p.17.

[31] See Chapter 5.

[32] ANAO, Audit Report No.43 2011-12.

[33] Ibid p.78.

[34] Ibid p.73.

[35] CGRIS, 3rd report, p.17 …the first versions of the LIPs were ‘works in progress’ and for this reason, “plans to plan”, incomplete building blocks and limited detail in some cases have been accepted as necessary to achieving sign off in the time available’.

[36] Ibid.

[37] See Chapter 3.

[38] NPA RSD Paragraphs 25 to 30.

[39] See Chapter 5 Coordination of the reporting and accountability requirements and Section 5 ANAO, Audit Report No.43 2011‑12 that also reported concerns about the reporting burden associated with the NPA RSD.

[40] See Chapter 6.

[41] In the NT, GBMs employ the Visiting Officer Notification (VON) system. In Qld, the ROC keeps a calendar of service provider visits to the community. See Chapter 5.

[42] See Chapter 5 under ‘Strategies for improving service coordination in communities’. A review of coordination and engagement under the NTER reported that the VON system was considered to be helping GBMs to coordinate visits to the community but was not used by all service providers and might be more strategically used at a coordination level above the GBM (Allen Consulting Group, op cit, p.24).

[43] See Chapter 5. Also note that the review of coordination and engagement under the NTER reported that inter-agency meetings are considered positively by service providers and GBMs (Allen Consulting Group, op cit p.22).

[44] See Chapter 5.

[45] The Coordinator General has consistently called for GBMs and other staff to be given more training in areas such as ‘program management, engagement, coordination and project planning’. CGRIS, 4th report, p.37; CGRIS, 2nd report, Recommendation 2; CGRIS 3rd report, pp.4-5; CGRIS, 4th report, p.20.

[46] CGRIS, 1st report, p.98.

[47] See Chapter 2.

[48] See Chapter 5.

[49] In the service provider survey, respondents rated the IEOs more positively than the GBMs, LIP process or the Local Reference Groups in helping community engagement. Across all jurisdictions, 30% of service providers felt that IEOs were ‘very effective’ in helping community engagement and 27% felt they were ‘quite effective’. Only 19% said they were ‘notveryeffective’ and 8% said they were ‘not effective’.

[50] Allen Consulting Group, op cit p.16 and p.51.

[51] The Northern Territory Coordinator General has highlighted the potential conflict for IEOs with their other representative roles in the community, which ‘may compromise their independence’ (Northern Territory Coordinator General, 2012, p.40).

[52] CGRIS, 7th report, p.3 and Allen Consulting Group, op cit, pp.60-61.

[53] Chapter 6 Section 6.1.5.

[54] Chapter 5 Section 5.5.5 Purpose of the role.

[55] The job descriptions for these positions usually describe part of the role as being ‘the key liaison and consultation point in communities’ and refer to ‘engaging with community leaders and acknowledged and respected elders’, although some job descriptions emphasise that it is ‘not a community development officer role’.

[56] CGRIS, 4th report, p.87 The Coordinator General also suggested that the title of GBM may require redefining to Government Engagement and Coordination Officers, a title that reflects more precisely the RSD approach on engagement and coordination. See footnote 26.

[57] Also see discussion under Section A.1 Coordination of government services – clarity of role, need for training in community development, delegated authority to make decisions.

[58] Chapter 6, Figure 6.2 It should be noted, however, that in one jurisdiction, the majority of respondents who were able to answer indicated that the positions were not effective or not very effective.

[59] Also see discussion in Chapter 2.

[60] See Chapter 6.

[61] Ibid.

[62] Chapter 5 Section 5.7.2 Community participation and ownership.

[63] Northern Territory Coordinator General for Remote Services, Report June 2011-August 2012, p.41.

[64] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.63 The Coordinator General noted ‘While there have been many examples of good engagement, it has not been consistent across all sites. In some instances, governments have conceived, written and presented highly developed Plans to communities as a starting point for discussion. I do not believe that this is conducive to a ground up approach and community ownership of the Plans’.

[65] Ibid p.36.

[66] CGRIS, 6th report, p.71.

[67] Chapter 5 Section 5.7.2 The importance of clear communication and mutual understanding.

[68] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.22.

[69] Chapter 5.

[70] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.21.

[71] Morgan Disney & Associates, Synopsis Review of the COAG Trial Evaluations Report to the Office of Indigenous Policy Coordination, 2006, p.6.

[72] The NPA RSD is not prescriptive about the way in which consultation with Indigenous communities around LIPs is to occur, and does not mention Local Reference Groups.

[73] See Chapter 5. The Coordinator General made the same observation in his second report (CGRIS, 2nd report, p.32).

[74] CGRIS, 4th report, p.31.

[75] NPA RSD, Schedule C, Paragraph C.1.

[76] CGRIS, 4th report, p.86.

[77] Chapter 6.

[78] It might be expected that service providers would self-report high levels of community engagement. By contrast, in 2011 research on coordination and engagement under the NTER, survey respondents drawn mostly from government agencies were generally negative about whether service providers worked collaboratively with communities. In the survey, 44% said service provider organisations ‘never’ work collaboratively with communities, 40% said they do ‘some of the time’, while only 6% said ‘most of the time’ or ‘always’ (Allen Consulting Group, op cit p.39).

[79] CGRIS, 4th report, p.40.

[80] CGRIS, 6th report, p.71.

[81] For example, in his fifth report, he stated: ‘While there is good progress in some areas in developing the new ways of working required by the service delivery principles, I remain concerned that insufficient systematic effort is being applied in this area, particularly in relation to developing the capacity of government staff to work in partnership in a community development approach’ (CGRIS, 5th report, p.2).

[82] The Coordinator General’s reports have periodically profiled good practices in various jurisdictions.

[83] Chapter 5.

[84] Chapter 5.

[85] Chapter 5.8.

[86] Ibid.

[87] For example, the Community Safety Planning processes in Mornington Island and Doomadgee.

[88]The Coordinator General noted in 2010: ‘I have subsequently vigorously advocated for governance and leadership training to be prioritised and aligned to the Local Implementation Planning process. While there has been considerable activity in this area in all communities, the commitment has been variable. There have been some innovative approaches. Nonetheless, I have concerns about the general quality and effectiveness of what has occurred to date’ (CGRIS, 2nd report, p.39). See also CGRIS, 4th report, p.17 and CGRIS, 7th report, p.18.

[89] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.60.

[90] NPA RSD, Paragraph 19(f).

[91] The Coordinator General noted in his fourth report that despite the identified need for ongoing support for governance and leadership training for each community in all of his previous reports ‘as yet there is no overall strategic response or dedicated fund for each community’ (CGRIS, 4th report, p.17). In his most recent report, he notes that ‘there has been some effort in this area, but it has been ad hoc and not part of an integrated approach’ (CGRIS, 7th report, p.18).

[92] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.65 (Recommendation 1).

[93] See Chapter 3.

[94] CGRIS, 2nd report, p.60.

[95] CGRIS, 3rd report, p.18.

[96] Chapter 5 This finding is consistent with the Coordinator General’s observation: ‘While training of young leaders and of individuals is clearly important, in those communities with poorly developed local governance arrangements, more innovative approaches should be developed and resourced’ (CGRIS, 3rd report, p.94).

[97] Building Indigenous community organisation capacity is articulated in various parts of the NPA RSD including:
Paragraph 16:
(c) community organisations deliver government services that meet relevant legislative requirements and are accountable to their constituents and funding bodies;
(e) better coordinated, consistent and connected government services and more highly developed capacity in Indigenous communities; and
(f) enhanced workforce planning including the development of local skills and a stable local workforce.
Schedule C to the NPA RSD, Indigenous engagement principle (Paragraph C3) also states: ‘Engagement with Indigenous men, women and children and communities should be central to the design and delivery of programs and services’. The sustainability principle (Paragraph C10(c)(i)) refers to ‘developing the skills, knowledge and competencies of Indigenous people, communities and organisations; and ‘recognising when Indigenous delivery is an important contributor to outcomes (direct and indirect), and in those instances fostering opportunities for Indigenous service delivery’ (Paragraph C10(c)(v).
The shared obligations of governments under the NPA RSD further include mention of ‘capacity building opportunities (for example, training in leadership, financial management and administration for existing and potential members of governing bodies in remote communities)’ and ‘provide technical support and funding to establish and maintain appropriate structures and capacity for corporate governance, where appropriate’ (Paragraph 21(g)).

[98] This confirms the observation of the Coordinator General in 2010: ‘Across the board there is very little emphasis on developing the capacity of other community organisations, which is a key objective of the National Partnership’ (CGRIS,3rdreport, p.17).

[99] This was seen as a result of the inclination for government to put services out to competitive tendering that favoured larger NGOs with more robust governance and financial management capacity than local Indigenous organisations.

[100] Chapter 5.

[101] A number of respondents to the online survey raised community driven decisions and local driven services as an enabler for improving service delivery – see Chapter 6 Enablers.

[102] Also see Chapter 5.8.

[103] Pearson N, Recent indigenous policy failures can’t be pinned on Aborigines, The Weekend Australian, June 15-16, 2013,p.19.

[104] Havnen O, Healing the Fault Lines: uniting politicians, bureaucrats and NGOs for improved outcomes in Aboriginal health, 7th Lowitja O’Donoghue Oration, 28 May 2013.

[105] Shergold P, The best of intentions, the worst of outcomes for Indigenous people, The Weekend Australian, June 8-9, 2013,p.19.

[106] Havnen, op cit, p.11.

[107] Pearson, op cit.

[108] Regional workshops with service providers to inform development of the service provider survey were conducted in Dubbo, Broome and by teleconference to Mt Isa.

[109] ‘Place based training and capacity development for Indigenous organisations can be patchy and dependent on sporadic funding, with variable quality among providers and limited monitoring of outcomes. There is a need for better alignment between corporate governance capacity building strategies for Indigenous non-government organisations in Remote Service Delivery communities’ (CGRIS, 6th report, p.61).

[110] www.dss.gov.au/Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory

[111] www.dss.gov.au/Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement.

[112] Tempo Strategies, Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement, Progress evaluation, May 2012.

[113] www.dss.gov.au/Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement Progress evaluation.

[114] www.dss.gov.au/Cape York Welfare Reform Evaluation Report 2012.

[115] The CYWR Project Board agreement set out how the Australian Government, Queensland Government and Cape York Partnerships for Welfare Reform and regional organisations will work together, and with other stakeholders, to deliver theCYWR.

[116] The revised draft project board agreement has not yet been agreed to by the Project Board.

[117] www.dss.gov.au/Cape York Welfare Reform Evaluation Report 2012.

[118] www.mpra.com.au.

[119] www.dss.gov.au/Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement.

[120] Wilcannia LIP p.12.

[121] Walgett LIP.

[122] The 13 workshops are counted as individual projects under the Local Research Projects. Two communities (Angurugu and Umbakumba) were not included in these workshops as they had already carried out similar work under the Groote and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement.

[123] Information sourced from individual community LIPs.

[124] Ibid.

[125] The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island RPA was agreed in May 2008 and this formed the basis of the LIP.

[126] As above.

[127] A breakdown of the funding allocation for element three for Commonwealth own purpose expenditure by State, and State and Territory own purpose expenditure is provided at page 14 of the National Partnership Agreement www.federalfinancialrelations.gov.au/CtG Early Childhood National Partnership Agreement.

[128] These two types of statistical analyses are closely related, but allow for different hypotheses to be tested. The linear regression tests for a common trend over the entire time period (2008 to 2012), and this is represented as an “average” change per year in the proportion of students at or above NMS across all of the RSD schools. The ANOVA is a more general test on whether grouping the NAPLAN data for the five year period by the calendar year of the test helps to explain a significant part of the total variation observed across the schools in the entire period.
The ANOVA approach can also test for a more specific hypothesis of significant changes in the NAPLAN results between any two pairs of calendar years (i.e. 2008 vs. 2012, or 2009 vs. 2011). Even if there isn't a common trend over all years, it may be possible that large and significant changes may occur between any two specific years but not be uniform across the years to be represented as a significant common trend. This divergence may occur when the NAPLAN results increase significantly in one period followed by significant decreases in subsequent periods, so that the overall common trend is close to zero, yet grouping the data by year show significant differences across specific years.

[129] The published data show no clear direction in NAPLAN results across the RSD schools, so there would be little value in repeating analyses with a complicated weighting system on the number of students who sat the NAPLAN tests by year level for each particular school.

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